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Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Social Network Approaches to Urban and Regional Carbon Management 5-7 April, 2005, Tsukuba, Japan

Description: This proceedings provides possible answer to the question of what social network analysis can contribute to addressing the problem of climate change. In the workshop, social scientists from Japan, the USA, and Europe reported on social network theory, applications and methodology to envision their use for on-the-ground social change regarding carbon management. The earth has always cycled carbon in the atmosphere (mainly as CO2); in the oceans (surface, intermediate waters, deep waters and marine sediments); in terrestrial ecosystems (vegetation, litter and soil); in rivers and estuaries; and in fossil carbon, which is being remobilized by human activities. However, with the rate of fossil fuel burning feeding industrialization, urbanization and transportation and with large scale land clearing, the naturally balanced carbon cycle is in a non-analogous and dangerous state. The participants agreed that current management of the carbon cycle is piecemeal, careless, inconsistent, profligate and shortsighted. Enabled by past and current networks of power, the world has embraced a carbon culture that has spun out of control in the past 100 years. This issue has often been referred to as a problem of scale in the climate change research community (or frames in the social science community). Climate researchers have focused their analyses on global level simulations that are too abstract and removed from local level policy concerns. Successful carbon management in the future will have to bridge this gap by mapping different stakeholder needs and finding synergistic intersections for policy implementation.
Date: January 15, 2006
Creator: Scholz, Stephen; Canan, Penelope & Yamagata, Yoshiki

Assembly Bill No. 32 CHAPTER 488

Description: California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006. This bill would require Air Resources Board (ARB) to adopt a statewide greenhouse gas emissions limit equivalent to the statewide greenhouse gas emissions levels in 1990 to be achieved by 2020. ARB shall adopt regulations to require the reporting and verification of statewide greenhouse gas emissions and to monitor and enforce compliance with this program. AB 32 directs Climate Action Team established by the Governor to coordinate the efforts set forth under Executive Order S-3-05 to continue its role in coordinating overall climate policy.
Date: September 2006
Creator: Secretary of State

U.S. Climate Change Technology Program Strategic Plan

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has released the Climate Change Technology Program (CCTP) Strategic Plan, which details measures to accelerate the development and reduce the cost of new and advanced technologies that avoid, reduce, or capture and store greenhouse gas emissions. According to the DOE, the CCTP is the technology component of a comprehensive U.S. strategy introduced by President George W. Bush in 2002 to combat climate change that includes measures to slow the growth of greenhouse gas emissions through voluntary, incentive-based, and mandatory partnerships; advance climate change science; spur clean energy technology development and deployment; and promote international collaboration.
Date: September 2006
Creator: The U.S. Climate Change Technology Program

Species Fact Sheet: Illegal and Unsustainable Wildlife Trade

Description: Each year, hundreds of millions of plants and animals are caught or harvested from the wild and then sold as food, pets, ornamental plants, leather, tourist curios, and medicine. While a great deal of this trade is legal and is not harming wild populations, a worryingly large proportion is illegal ? and threatens the survival of many endangered species. With over exploitation being the second-largest direct threat to many species after habitat loss, WWF is addressing illegal and unsustainable wildlife trade as a priority issue.
Date: 2006
Creator: Traffic

Temperature Trends in the Lower Atmosphere: Steps for Understanding and Reconciling Differences

Description: This Synthesis and Assessment Product is an important revision to the conclusions of earlier reports from the U.S. National Research Council and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Previously reported discrepancies between the amount of warming near the surface and higher in the atmosphere have been used to challenge the reliability of climate models and the reality of human-induced global warming. Specifically, surface data showed substantial global-average warming, while early versions of satellite and radiosonde data showed little or no warming above the surface. This significant discrepancy no longer exists because errors in the satellite and radiosonde data have been identified and corrected. New data sets have also been developed that do not show such discrepancies. This Synthesis and Assessment Product is an important revision to the conclusions of earlier reports from the U.S. National Research Council and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. For recent decades, all current atmospheric data sets now show global-average warming that is similar to the surface warming. While these data are consistent with the results from climate models at the global scale, discrepancies in the tropics remain to be resolved. Nevertheless, the most recent observational and model evidence has increased confidence in our understanding of observed climatic changes and their causes.
Date: April 2006
Creator: U.S. Climate Change Science Program and the Subcommittee on Global Change Research

Our Planet, Special Issue, 2006

Description: Magazine of the United Nations Environment Programme discussing worldwide environmental policies and other concerns. This issue is devoted to environmental factors in the Caribbean Sea, and international policies and agreements between Caribbean nations to mitigate and manage common problems.
Date: 2006
Creator: United Nations Environment Programme

Climate Change:Why We Need to Take Action Now

Description: Numerous independent analyses indicate that we must limit climate change to less than 2ºC above preindustrial temperatures to avoid dangerous impacts to nature, humans, and the global economy.Average global warming of 2°C will result in dangerous and irreversible effects, which rapidly worsen above 2°C warming.This paper seeks to identify the massive difference between the impacts that will happen at 2 and 3°C.
Date: September 2006
Creator: World Wild Fund Climate Change