UNT Libraries - 235 Matching Results

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Learning from small data set for object recognition in mobile platforms.

Description: Did you stand at a door with a bunch of keys and tried to find the right one to unlock the door? Did you hold a flower and wonder the name of it? A need of object recognition could rise anytime and any where in our daily lives. With the development of mobile devices object recognition applications become possible to provide immediate assistance. However, performing complex tasks in even the most advanced mobile platforms still faces great challenges due to the limited computing resources and computing power. In this thesis, we present an object recognition system that resides and executes within a mobile device, which can efficiently extract image features and perform learning and classification. To account for the computing constraint, a novel feature extraction method that minimizes the data size and maintains data consistency is proposed. This system leverages principal component analysis method and is able to update the trained classifier when new examples become available . Our system relieves users from creating a lot of examples and makes it user friendly. The experimental results demonstrate that a learning method trained with a very small number of examples can achieve recognition accuracy above 90% in various acquisition conditions. In addition, the system is able to perform learning efficiently.
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Date: May 2016
Creator: Liu, Siyuan

Cross Language Information Retrieval for Languages with Scarce Resources

Description: Our generation has experienced one of the most dramatic changes in how society communicates. Today, we have online information on almost any imaginable topic. However, most of this information is available in only a few dozen languages. In this thesis, I explore the use of parallel texts to enable cross-language information retrieval (CLIR) for languages with scarce resources. To build the parallel text I use the Bible. I evaluate different variables and their impact on the resulting CLIR system, specifically: (1) the CLIR results when using different amounts of parallel text; (2) the role of paraphrasing on the quality of the CLIR output; (3) the impact on accuracy when translating the query versus translating the collection of documents; and finally (4) how the results are affected by the use of different dialects. The results show that all these variables have a direct impact on the quality of the CLIR system.
Date: May 2009
Creator: Loza, Christian

Optimizing Non-pharmaceutical Interventions Using Multi-coaffiliation Networks

Description: Computational modeling is of fundamental significance in mapping possible disease spread, and designing strategies for its mitigation. Conventional contact networks implement the simulation of interactions as random occurrences, presenting public health bodies with a difficult trade off between a realistic model granularity and robust design of intervention strategies. Recently, researchers have been investigating the use of agent-based models (ABMs) to embrace the complexity of real world interactions. At the same time, theoretical approaches provide epidemiologists with general optimization models in which demographics are intrinsically simplified. The emerging study of affiliation networks and co-affiliation networks provide an alternative to such trade off. Co-affiliation networks maintain the realism innate to ABMs while reducing the complexity of contact networks into distinctively smaller k-partite graphs, were each partition represent a dimension of the social model. This dissertation studies the optimization of intervention strategies for infectious diseases, mainly distributed in school systems. First, concepts of synthetic populations and affiliation networks are extended to propose a modified algorithm for the synthetic reconstruction of populations. Second, the definition of multi-coaffiliation networks is presented as the main social model in which risk is quantified and evaluated, thereby obtaining vulnerability indications for each school in the system. Finally, maximization of the mitigation coverage and minimization of the overall cost of intervention strategies are proposed and compared, based on centrality measures.
Date: May 2013
Creator: Loza, Olivia G.

A Wireless Traffic Surveillance System Using Video Analytics

Description: Video surveillance systems have been commonly used in transportation systems to support traffic monitoring, speed estimation, and incident detection. However, there are several challenges in developing and deploying such systems, including high development and maintenance costs, bandwidth bottleneck for long range link, and lack of advanced analytics. In this thesis, I leverage current wireless, video camera, and analytics technologies, and present a wireless traffic monitoring system. I first present an overview of the system. Then I describe the site investigation and several test links with different hardware/software configurations to demonstrate the effectiveness of the system. The system development process was documented to provide guidelines for future development. Furthermore, I propose a novel speed-estimation analytics algorithm that takes into consideration roads with slope angles. I prove the correctness of the algorithm theoretically, and validate the effectiveness of the algorithm experimentally. The experimental results on both synthetic and real dataset show that the algorithm is more accurate than the baseline algorithm 80% of the time. On average the accuracy improvement of speed estimation is over 3.7% even for very small slope angles.
Date: May 2011
Creator: Luo, Ning

End of Insertion Detection in Colonoscopy Videos

Description: Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths behind lung cancer in the United States. Colonoscopy is the preferred screening method for detection of diseases like Colorectal Cancer. In the year 2006, American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) and American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) issued guidelines for quality colonoscopy. The guidelines suggest that on average the withdrawal phase during a screening colonoscopy should last a minimum of 6 minutes. My aim is to classify the colonoscopy video into insertion and withdrawal phase. The problem is that currently existing shot detection techniques cannot be applied because colonoscopy is a single camera shot from start to end. An algorithm to detect phase boundary has already been developed by the MIGLAB team. Existing method has acceptable levels of accuracy but the main issue is dependency on MPEG (Moving Pictures Expert Group) 1/2. I implemented exhaustive search for motion estimation to reduce the execution time and improve the accuracy. I took advantages of the C/C++ programming languages with multithreading which helped us get even better performances in terms of execution time. I propose a method for improving the current method of colonoscopy video analysis and also an extension for the same to make it usable for real time videos. The real time version we implemented is capable of handling streams coming directly from the camera in the form of uncompressed bitmap frames. Existing implementation could not be applied to real time scenario because of its dependency on MPEG 1/2. Future direction of this research includes improved motion search and GPU parallel computing techniques.
Date: August 2009
Creator: Malik, Avnish Rajbal

Web Services for Libraries

Description: Library information systems use different software applications and automated systems to gain access to distributed information. Rapid application development, changes made to existing software applications and development of new software on different platforms can make it difficult for library information systems to interoperate. Web services are used to offer better information access and retrieval solutions and hence make it more cost effective for libraries. This research focuses on how web services are implemented with the standard protocols like SOAP, WSDL and UDDI using different programming languages and platforms to achieve interoperability for libraries. It also shows how libraries can make use of this new technology. Since web services built on different platforms can interact with each other, libraries can access information with more efficiency and flexibility.
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Date: December 2003
Creator: Manikonda, Sunil Prasad

Modeling Complex Forest Ecology in a Parallel Computing Infrastructure

Description: Effective stewardship of forest ecosystems make it imperative to measure, monitor, and predict the dynamic changes of forest ecology. Measuring and monitoring provides us a picture of a forest's current state and the necessary data to formulate models for prediction. However, societal and natural events alter the course of a forest's development. A simulation environment that takes into account these events will facilitate forest management. In this thesis, we describe an efficient parallel implementation of a land cover use model, Mosaic, and discuss the development efforts to incorporate spatial interaction and succession dynamics into the model. To evaluate the performance of our implementation, an extensive set of simulation experiments was carried out using a dataset representing the H.J. Andrews Forest in the Oregon Cascades. Results indicate that a significant reduction in the simulation execution time of our parallel model can be achieved as compared to uni-processor simulations.
Date: August 2003
Creator: Mayes, John

Developing a Test Bed for Interactive Narrative in Virtual Environments

Description: As Virtual Environments (VE) become a more commonly used method of interaction and presentation, supporting users as they navigate and interact with scenarios presented in VE will be a significant issue. A key step in understanding the needs of users in these situations will be observing them perform representative tasks in a fully developed environment. In this paper, we describe the development of a test bed for interactive narrative in a virtual environment. The test bed was specifically developed to present multiple, simultaneous sequences of events (scenarios or narratives) and to support user navigation through these scenarios. These capabilities will support the development of multiple users testing scenarios, allowing us to study and better understand the needs of users of narrative VEs.
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Date: August 2002
Creator: Mellacheruvu, Krishna

Automated Syndromic Surveillance using Intelligent Mobile Agents

Description: Current syndromic surveillance systems utilize centralized databases that are neither scalable in storage space nor in computing power. Such systems are limited in the amount of syndromic data that may be collected and analyzed for the early detection of infectious disease outbreaks. However, with the increased prevalence of international travel, public health monitoring must extend beyond the borders of municipalities or states which will require the ability to store vasts amount of data and significant computing power for analyzing the data. Intelligent mobile agents may be used to create a distributed surveillance system that will utilize the hard drives and computer processing unit (CPU) power of the hosts on the agent network where the syndromic information is located. This thesis proposes the design of a mobile agent-based syndromic surveillance system and an agent decision model for outbreak detection. Simulation results indicate that mobile agents are capable of detecting an outbreak that occurs at all hosts the agent is monitoring. Further study of agent decision models is required to account for localized epidemics and variable agent movement rates.
Date: December 2007
Creator: Miller, Paul

A Multi-Time Scale Learning Mechanism for Neuromimic Processing

Description: Learning and representing and reasoning about temporal relations, particularly causal relations, is a deep problem in artificial intelligence (AI). Learning such representations in the real world is complicated by the fact that phenomena are subject to multiple time scale influences and may operate with a strange attractor dynamic. This dissertation proposes a new computational learning mechanism, the adaptrode, which, used in a neuromimic processing architecture may help to solve some of these problems. The adaptrode is shown to emulate the dynamics of real biological synapses and represents a significant departure from the classical weighted input scheme of conventional artificial neural networks. Indeed the adaptrode is shown, by analysis of the deep structure of real synapses, to have a strong structural correspondence with the latter in terms of multi-time scale biophysical processes. Simulations of an adaptrode-based neuron and a small network of neurons are shown to have the same learning capabilities as invertebrate animals in classical conditioning. Classical conditioning is considered a fundamental learning task in animals. Furthermore, it is subject to temporal ordering constraints that fulfill the criteria of causal relations in natural systems. It may offer clues to the learning of causal relations and mechanisms for causal reasoning. The adaptrode is shown to solve an advanced problem in classical conditioning that addresses the problem of real world dynamics. A network is able to learn multiple, contrary associations that separate in time domains, that is a long-term memory can co-exist with a short-term contrary memory without destroying the former. This solves the problem of how to deal with meaningful transients while maintaining long-term memories. Possible applications of adaptrode-based neural networks are explored and suggestions for future research are made.
Date: August 1994
Creator: Mobus, George E. (George Edward)

Automatic Removal of Complex Shadows From Indoor Videos

Description: Shadows in indoor scenarios are usually characterized with multiple light sources that produce complex shadow patterns of a single object. Without removing shadow, the foreground object tends to be erroneously segmented. The inconsistent hue and intensity of shadows make automatic removal a challenging task. In this thesis, a dynamic thresholding and transfer learning-based method for removing shadows is proposed. The method suppresses light shadows with a dynamically computed threshold and removes dark shadows using an online learning strategy that is built upon a base classifier trained with manually annotated examples and refined with the automatically identified examples in the new videos. Experimental results demonstrate that despite variation of lighting conditions in videos our proposed method is able to adapt to the videos and remove shadows effectively. The sensitivity of shadow detection changes slightly with different confidence levels used in example selection for classifier retraining and high confidence level usually yields better performance with less retraining iterations.
Date: August 2015
Creator: Mohapatra, Deepankar

The enhancement of machine translation for low-density languages using Web-gathered parallel texts.

Description: The majority of the world's languages are poorly represented in informational media like radio, television, newspapers, and the Internet. Translation into and out of these languages may offer a way for speakers of these languages to interact with the wider world, but current statistical machine translation models are only effective with a large corpus of parallel texts - texts in two languages that are translations of one another - which most languages lack. This thesis describes the Babylon project which attempts to alleviate this shortage by supplementing existing parallel texts with texts gathered automatically from the Web -- specifically targeting pages that contain text in a pair of languages. Results indicate that parallel texts gathered from the Web can be effectively used as a source of training data for machine translation and can significantly improve the translation quality for text in a similar domain. However, the small quantity of high-quality low-density language parallel texts on the Web remains a significant obstacle.
Date: December 2007
Creator: Mohler, Michael Augustine Gaylord

An Algorithm for the PLA Equivalence Problem

Description: The Programmable Logic Array (PLA) has been widely used in the design of VLSI circuits and systems because of its regularity, flexibility, and simplicity. The equivalence problem is typically to verify that the final description of a circuit is functionally equivalent to its initial description. Verifying the functional equivalence of two descriptions is equivalent to proving their logical equivalence. This problem of pure logic is essential to circuit design. The most widely used technique to solve the problem is based on Binary Decision Diagram or BDD, proposed by Bryant in 1986. Unfortunately, BDD requires too much time and space to represent moderately large circuits for equivalence testing. We design and implement a new algorithm called the Cover-Merge Algorithm for the equivalence problem based on a divide-and-conquer strategy using the concept of cover and a derivational method. We prove that the algorithm is sound and complete. Because of the NP-completeness of the problem, we emphasize simplifications to reduce the search space or to avoid redundant computations. Simplification techniques are incorporated into the algorithm as an essential part to speed up the the derivation process. Two different sets of heuristics are developed for two opposite goals: one for the proof of equivalence and the other for its disproof. Experiments on a large scale of data have shown that big speed-ups can be achieved by prioritizing the heuristics and by choosing the most favorable one at each iteration of the Algorithm. Results are compared with those for BDD on standard benchmark problems as well as on random PLAs to perform an unbiased way of testing algorithms. It has been shown that the Cover-Merge Algorithm outperforms BDD in nearly all problem instances in terms of time and space. The algorithm has demonstrated fairly stabilized and practical performances especially for big PLAs under a wide ...
Date: December 1995
Creator: Moon, Gyo Sik

Quantifying Design Principles in Reusable Software Components

Description: Software reuse can occur in various places during the software development cycle. Reuse of existing source code is the most commonly practiced form of software reuse. One of the key requirements for software reuse is readability, thus the interest in the use of data abstraction, inheritance, modularity, and aspects of the visible portion of module specifications. This research analyzed the contents of software reuse libraries to answer the basic question of what makes a good reusable software component. The approach taken was to measure and analyze various software metrics as mapped to design characteristics. A related research question investigated the change in the design principles over time. This was measured by comparing sets of Ada reuse libraries categorized into two time periods. It was discovered that recently developed Ada reuse components scored better on readability than earlier developed components. A benefit of this research has been the development of a set of "design for reuse" guidelines. These guidelines address coding practices as well as design principles for an Ada implementation. C++ software reuse libraries were also analyzed to determine if design principles can be applied in a language independent fashion. This research used cyclomatic complexity metrics, software science metrics, and traditional static code metrics to measure design features. This research provides at least three original contributions. First it collects empirical data about existing reuse libraries. Second, it develops a readability measure for software libraries which can aid in comparing libraries. And third, this research developed a set of coding and design guidelines for developers of reusable software. Future research can investigate how design principles for C++ change over time. Another topic for research is the investigation of systems employing reused components to determine which libraries are more successfully used than others.
Date: December 1995
Creator: Moore, Freeman Leroy

Using Normal Deduction Graphs in Common Sense Reasoning

Description: This investigation proposes a powerful formalization of common sense knowledge based on function-free normal deduction graphs (NDGs) which form a powerful tool for deriving Horn and non-Horn clauses without functions. Such formalization allows common sense reasoning since it has the ability to handle not only negative but also incomplete information.
Date: May 1992
Creator: Munoz, Ricardo A. (Ricardo Alberto)

Automatic Software Test Data Generation

Description: In software testing, it is often desirable to find test inputs that exercise specific program features. Finding these inputs manually, is extremely time consuming, especially, when the software being tested is complex. Therefore, there have been numerous attempts automate this process. Random test data generation consists of generating test inputs at random, in the hope that they will exercise the desired software features. Often the desired inputs must satisfy complex constraints, and this makes a random approach seem unlikely to succeed. In contrast, combinatorial optimization techniques, such as those using genetic algorithms, are meant to solve difficult problems involving simultaneous satisfaction of many constraints.
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Date: December 2002
Creator: Munugala, Ajay Kumar

Split array and scalar data cache: A comprehensive study of data cache organization.

Description: Existing cache organization suffers from the inability to distinguish different types of localities, and non-selectively cache all data rather than making any attempt to take special advantage of the locality type. This causes unnecessary movement of data among the levels of the memory hierarchy and increases in miss ratio. In this dissertation I propose a split data cache architecture that will group memory accesses as scalar or array references according to their inherent locality and will subsequently map each group to a dedicated cache partition. In this system, because scalar and array references will no longer negatively affect each other, cache-interference is diminished, delivering better performance. Further improvement is achieved by the introduction of victim cache, prefetching, data flattening and reconfigurability to tune the array and scalar caches for specific application. The most significant contribution of my work is the introduction of novel cache architecture for embedded microprocessor platforms. My proposed cache architecture uses reconfigurability coupled with split data caches to reduce area and power consumed by cache memories while retaining performance gains. My results show excellent reductions in both memory size and memory access times, translating into reduced power consumption. Since there was a huge reduction in miss rates at L-1 caches, further power reduction is achieved by partially or completely shutting down L-2 data or L-2 instruction caches. The saving in cache sizes resulting from these designs can be used for other processor activities including instruction and data prefetching, branch-prediction buffers. The potential benefits of such techniques for embedded applications have been evaluated in my work. I also explore how my cache organization performs for non-numeric data structures. I propose a novel idea called "Data flattening" which is a profile based memory allocation technique to compress sparsely scattered pointer data into regular contiguous memory locations and explore the ...
Date: August 2007
Creator: Naz, Afrin

Extracting Useful Information from Social Media during Disaster Events

Description: In recent years, social media platforms such as Twitter and Facebook have emerged as effective tools for broadcasting messages worldwide during disaster events. With millions of messages posted through these services during such events, it has become imperative to identify valuable information that can help the emergency responders to develop effective relief efforts and aid victims. Many studies implied that the role of social media during disasters is invaluable and can be incorporated into emergency decision-making process. However, due to the "big data" nature of social media, it is very labor-intensive to employ human resources to sift through social media posts and categorize/classify them as useful information. Hence, there is a growing need for machine intelligence to automate the process of extracting useful information from the social media data during disaster events. This dissertation addresses the following questions: In a social media stream of messages, what is the useful information to be extracted that can help emergency response organizations to become more situationally aware during and following a disaster? What are the features (or patterns) that can contribute to automatically identifying messages that are useful during disasters? We explored a wide variety of features in conjunction with supervised learning algorithms to automatically identify messages that are useful during disaster events. The feature design includes sentiment features to extract the geo-mapped sentiment expressed in tweets, as well as tweet-content and user detail features to predict the likelihood of the information contained in a tweet to be quickly spread in the network. Further experimentation is carried out to see how these features help in identifying the informative tweets and filter out those tweets that are conversational in nature.
Date: May 2017
Creator: Neppalli, Venkata Kishore

Techniques for Improving Uniformity in Direct Mapped Caches

Description: Directly mapped caches are an attractive option for processor designers as they combine fast lookup times with reduced complexity and area. However, directly-mapped caches are prone to higher miss-rates as there are no candidates for replacement on a cache miss, hence data residing in a cache set would have to be evicted to the next level cache. Another issue that inhibits cache performance is the non-uniformity of accesses exhibited by most applications: some sets are under-utilized while others receive the majority of accesses. This implies that increasing the size of caches may not lead to proportionally improved cache hit rates. Several solutions that address cache non-uniformity have been proposed in the literature. These techniques have been proposed over the past decade and each proposal independently claims the benefit of reduced conflict misses. However, because the published results use different benchmarks and different experimental setups, (there is no established frame of reference for comparing these results) it is not easy to compare them. In this work we report a side-by-side comparison of these techniques. Finally, we propose and Adaptive-Partitioned cache for multi-threaded applications. This design limits inter-thread thrashing while dynamically reducing traffic to heavily accessed sets.
Date: May 2011
Creator: Nwachukwu, Izuchukwu Udochi

Computational Epidemiology - Analyzing Exposure Risk: A Deterministic, Agent-Based Approach

Description: Many infectious diseases are spread through interactions between susceptible and infectious individuals. Keeping track of where each exposure to the disease took place, when it took place, and which individuals were involved in the exposure can give public health officials important information that they may use to formulate their interventions. Further, knowing which individuals in the population are at the highest risk of becoming infected with the disease may prove to be a useful tool for public health officials trying to curtail the spread of the disease. Epidemiological models are needed to allow epidemiologists to study the population dynamics of transmission of infectious agents and the potential impact of infectious disease control programs. While many agent-based computational epidemiological models exist in the literature, they focus on the spread of disease rather than exposure risk. These models are designed to simulate very large populations, representing individuals as agents, and using random experiments and probabilities in an attempt to more realistically guide the course of the modeled disease outbreak. The work presented in this thesis focuses on tracking exposure risk to chickenpox in an elementary school setting. This setting is chosen due to the high level of detailed information realistically available to school administrators regarding individuals' schedules and movements. Using an agent-based approach, contacts between individuals are tracked and analyzed with respect to both individuals and locations. The results are then analyzed using a combination of tools from computer science and geographic information science.
Date: August 2009
Creator: O'Neill II, Martin Joseph

Resource Allocation in Mobile and Wireless Networks

Description: The resources (memory, power and bandwidth) are limited in wireless and mobile networks. Previous research has shown that the quality of service (QoS) of the mobile client can be improved through efficient resources management. This thesis contains two areas of research that are strongly interrelated. In the first area of research, we extended the MoSync Algorithm, a network application layer media synchronization algorithm, to allow play-out of multimedia packets by the base station upon the mobile client in a First-In-First-Out (FIFO), Highest-Priority-First (PQ), Weighted Fair-Queuing (WFQ) and Round-Robin (RR) order. In the second area of research, we make modifications to the DSR and TORA routing algorithms to make them energy aware routing protocols. Our research shows that the QoS of the mobile client can be drastically improved through effective resource allocation.
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Date: August 2003
Creator: Owens II, Harold

A Multi-Variate Analysis of SMTP Paths and Relays to Restrict Spam and Phishing Attacks in Emails

Description: The classifier discussed in this thesis considers the path traversed by an email (instead of its content) and reputation of the relays, features inaccessible to spammers. Groups of spammers and individual behaviors of a spammer in a given domain were analyzed to yield association patterns, which were then used to identify similar spammers. Unsolicited and phishing emails were successfully isolated from legitimate emails, using analysis results. Spammers and phishers are also categorized into serial spammers/phishers, recent spammers/phishers, prospective spammers/phishers, and suspects. Legitimate emails and trusted domains are classified into socially close (family members, friends), socially distinct (strangers etc), and opt-outs (resolved false positives and false negatives). Overall this classifier resulted in far less false positives when compared to current filters like SpamAssassin, achieving a 98.65% precision, which is well comparable to the precisions achieved by SPF, DNSRBL blacklists.
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Date: December 2006
Creator: Palla, Srikanth