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A Study Concerning the Use of Microcomputers for Word Processing in College Freshman Composition at a Community College

Description: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of using word processing and proofreading software in freshman composition at a community college. This study used pretest and posttest measures to determine if significant differences in the improvement of composition skills occurred between students in a composition class that did not use microcomputers and students in a composition class that did use microcomputers. Objective tests and writing samples were used as measurements. The population for the study consisted of students enrolled in freshman composition classes at a two year community college. Students self-selected enrollment in each class. Three hundred students who completed the pretest and posttest measures and completed the course were included in the study. There was no significant difference found in the improvement of writing skills between the two groups as measured by the objective test or the writing samples. There was a significant difference found in the withdrawal rate of students from the classes. The computer class had a significantly higher withdrawal rate than the non-computer class.
Date: May 1990
Creator: Rode, Mary

Development of Cooperative Education at the University of North Texas, 1976-1988

Description: The main purpose of the study is to describe the developmental story of one of the larger university cooperative education programs in the United States to provide the evidence of outcomes and to utilize selected elements of the program in other colleges and universities. The study utilizes historical methodology with a descriptive approach to investigate and analyze the program's establishment, its development of staffing, organization, students, employers, funding, and its evaluation by using primary and secondary sources, annual reports, federal grant request proposals, evaluation reports, and the on-campus newspaper. The information for this study was also gathered through personal interviews with previous and present staff members of the program. The study shows that the program was established in the dean of students' office, but in order to get more support from the faculty, the program was moved to the academic affairs office. As a result of the academic support by the faculty, the program expanded. The findings show that the federal grant, Title VIII, contributed significantly to the initiation and growth of the program. The investigator observes that the director's leadership and the staff members' commitment to the program were two of the most important factors in the continued growth of the program. Strong commitment by the chief executive officer of the institution has also been a strong factor in the continuous growth of the program. The study indicates that close affiliation with professional organizations has benefited the program by influencing the development of quality and effective, diverse employers. The results show that the cooperative program significantly aided the students, institutions, and employers annually by placing approximately 1,200 students in their major-related working places.
Date: May 1990
Creator: Kim, Sang Kil

Performance on Selected Mathematics and Reading Assessment Tests as Predictors of Achievement in Remedial Mathematics

Description: The problem of this study was performance on selected mathematics and reading assessment tests as predictors of achievement in remedial mathematics. The purpose of the study was twofold. The first was to determine the internal consistency of a locally developed remedial mathematics placement test and the mathematics section of the Pre-TASP Test. The second was to determine the predictive validity of performance on (a) the local remedial mathematics placement test, (b) the mathematics section of the Pre-TASP Test, and (c) the Descriptive Tests of Language Skills, Reading Comprehension Test in combination with demographic variables for mid-semester achievement, end-of-semester achievement, and course success in three levels of remedial mathematics at Richland College, Dallas, Texas.
Date: December 1990
Creator: Branum, Barbara K. (Barbara Kay)

Faculty and Administrators' Job Preferential and Job Satisfaction Factors at the University of Guam

Description: Research into job preference and job satisfaction addresses the agreement between individual and institutional values leading to job choice and job satisfaction. This research assessed ten job preference and ten job satisfaction factors at the University of Guam. Ninety-one faculty members and 32 administrators completed a two-page paired-comparison questionnaire. Demographic data were also collected. Factors' hierarchy and valence positions were reported and subjected to "PCSTATS" program to determine significance among pairs. Significant differences existed in three of the four hypotheses measuring the job preferential factors: advancement, benefits, company, co-workers, hours, pay, security, supervisor, type of work, and working conditions; and job satisfaction factors: good wages, job security, interesting work, tactful disciplining, in on things, working conditions, management loyalty, appreciation, promotion, and sympathetic understanding. Additional findings were made using post hoc analysis. Results indicated that administrators perceived others' preferences to be (a) pay, (b) advancement, and (c) type of work while faculty chose (a) type of work, (b) pay, and (c) advancement. In job satisfaction administrators selected (a) promotion, (b) good wages, and (c) job security, while the faculty chose (a) interesting work, (b) good wages, and (c) promotion. Self job preference factors chosen by males and females were (a) type of work and (b) pay with (c) advancement and (c) co-workers, respectively. The top three self job satisfaction factors chosen by males and females were (a) interesting work, (b) good wages, and (c) promotion. Disagreement is evident between groups. It is recommended that the findings be used in the selection and retention of faculty members at the University of Guam.
Date: August 1990
Creator: Santos, Robert D. (Robert David)

The Use of Part-Time Faculty in Associate Degree Nursing, Social Science, and Biological Science Programs

Description: This study surveyed the opinions of academic administrators of associate degree nursing programs, community college social science programs, and community college biological science programs regarding major benefits and concerns associated with the employment of part-time faculty. This study found that most part-time social science faculty teach in the classroom, half participate in non-teaching faculty activities, and most are paid a contract amount per course or credit hour. Part-time biological science faculty differed only in that most teach a combination of classroom and lab/practicum. Part-time nursing faculty differed in all three areas. Most part-time nursing faculty teach in lab or practicum settings, most participate in more non-teaching activities than other part-time faculty, and most are paid an hourly wage. However, the benefits and concerns associated with the employment of part-time nursing faculty were not significantly different from those identified by academic administrators of the other programs with one exception. Academic administrators felt that part-time nursing faculty expose students to the latest technologies in specialty areas and part-time social science faculty do not. The benefits cited by the respondents, that were in addition to the benefits most frequently cited in the literature, include increased interaction with the community and the ability to "try out" prospective full-time faculty. The concerns cited by respondents, that were in addition to the concerns most frequently cited in the literature, include the inability to find qualified part-time faculty to fill available positions and the concern that the employment of part-time faculty causes resentment among full-time faculty. The results from this study indicate that the literature pertaining to the benefits and concerns associated with the employment of social science and biological science part-time faculty in community colleges can be used to develop policies regarding part-time faculty in associate degree nursing programs.
Date: August 1990
Creator: Shepard, Pamela Ann

Materials, Practices, and Perceptions Associated with Prior Participation in an Aerospace Education Workshop: a Case Study

Description: This qualitative study was conducted in a large north Texas school district. The subjects were four elementary teachers who had previously attended a summer aerospace education workshop. The researcher observed in each classroom during science instruction and other areas where aerospace concepts might be taught to determine material usage, practices, and perceptions associated with teaching aerospace. The teachers' lesson planbooks, textbooks, and supplementary materials were also examined by the researcher. Interviews were conducted with each teacher's principal and the district science coordinator to determine their effects on the practices and perceptions of the subjects.
Date: May 1990
Creator: Boyd, Jacqueline Breeden

Performance Evaluation of Community College Management Instructors Using Student Achievement as the Criterion

Description: This study concerns the relationship between student evaluation of instruction and student achievement in the field of management at the community college level. Purposes of the study were to determine the subjective student evaluation of instructor performance in introductory classes of management, student achievement in the class upon completion of the course, and the relationship between the student evaluation of instructor performance and student achievement in knowledge of the course. The population studied was all 10 sections of the Principles of Management course taught by 8 instructors at Del Mar College in Corpus Christi, Texas during the fall semester of 1988. A pretest-posttest design was used to determine student achievement scores. The College Board provided sufficient copies of two versions of the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) tests for Introduction to Management for the pretest and posttest. A special statistical technique using multiple regression was used to calculate an achievement score for each student that was adjusted for entry level knowledge. Student evaluations of instructor performance were paired with the achievement scores and grades students received from the instructor. Additional confidential demographic data was obtained about the students and the instructors. Major findings of the study concluded there is no significant relationship between the student achievement scores and student evaluation of instructor performance. There was a wide variance in correlation of student grades and student achievement scores when individual sections or individual instructors were examined. The overall correlation of grades and achievement scores was statistically significant and was the highest of any of the factors studied. The study recommends using more objective measures of student achievement in evaluating faculty performance.
Date: May 1990
Creator: Jones, James McKernon

Parent Adaptive Doll Play with Children Experiencing Parental Separation/Divorce

Description: Parent Adaptive Doll Play, a technique in an early stage of development, is designed for use by parents in assisting their young children to cope with the stresses of parental separation/divorce. The effects of technique implementation by parents of three- through six-year-old children were investigated. Data was collected before and after parents received training and implemented the technique over an eight-week period. Parents completed the Child Behavior Rating Scale, Burks' Behavior Rating Scales, the Parenting Stress Index, and the Parental Attitude Scale. Twenty-two parents, reporting marital separation through separation and/or divorce, within 18 months prior to the beginning of the study, and reporting more than 50 percent physical custody of a three- through six-year-old child qualified for participation. Twelve children were experimental subjects and ten were control subjects. To determine differences between groups, a one-way analysis of covariance was performed on each post test variable. Positive differences were calculated in several areas of child behavior by parents of subjects in the experimental group. No significant differences between groups were found in any area of child behavior. The score which most closely approached significance, however, was found in the Burks' Behavior Rating Scale area of poor anger control.
Date: December 1990
Creator: Brennan, Carol A. (Carol Ann)

Academic Achievement of National Social Fraternity Pledges Compared to Non-Fraternity Students

Description: This study examined the academic achievement of national social fraternity pledges compared to non-fraternity students at the University of Texas at Arlington. It was done to determine whether significant differences existed between the grade point averages of pledges of social fraternities and those of students who did not pledge a social fraternity, and to determine whether significant differences existed among fraternities when compared with each other with respect to academic achievement. This study was meant to provide a research design that could be used by other colleges and universities with fraternities to conduct the same comparison of academic performance. In the fall semester of 1989, 164 pledges were selected as the population for the study to be matched with non-fraternity students based on Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) scores, age, sex, classification, academic major, and number of hours attempted. A T-test of like groups was performed on the entire population with no significant difference found at the .05 level between all the fraternity pledges and all the matched pairs. A T-test of like groups was performed on the pledges from each separate organization and there was a significant difference among three of the fraternities. Two of the fraternities had significantly higher grade point averages than those of their matched pairs, and one group of matched pairs had a significantly higher grade point average than the fraternity. Of the 17 fraternities, 12 had higher grade point averages than their matched pairs and five of the matched pairs had higher grade point averages than the fraternities. The results of this study show that objective data can be collected to address the issue of academic excellence comparing fraternity and non-fraternity populations. It is recommended that further study be conducted in this area to establish longitudinal data, with specific examination of the scholarship programs of ...
Date: August 1990
Creator: Gardner, Kent Lee

Strategic Planning Applications in Postsecondary Institutions with Accredited Physical Therapy Educational Programs

Description: Although strategic planning has been used successfully in most major business institutions, higher education has been slow to adopt this management technique. Involvement in planning is a critical issue for allied health educational programs, such as physical therapy, which are relatively new to the academic environment. These programs face a continual need to update their curricula and clinical education based on rapid changes in the health care delivery system and the profession. The problem of this study was to determine the extent to which the strategic planning process is currently applied in institutions in the United States which offer accredited physical therapy educational programs. The population of this study was made up of the chief executive officers of the 115 public and independent institutions that offer physical therapy educational programs. Selected experts on strategic planning and chief executive officers were surveyed in two phases using a mailed questionnaire designed to measure the organization, characteristics, and impact of strategic planning in institutions that offer accredited physical therapy educational programs. Seventy-three percent of the chief executive officers responded, and 50.9 percent indicated their involvement with strategic planning by completing the questionnaire. The findings indicate that, although there is general agreement between the experts and the chief executive officers concerning the characteristics of strategic planning, differences exist. Differences were also identified between academic health centers and other types of institutions, between public and independent institutions, and between institutions by type of physical therapy degree offered. It was concluded that, in the opinion of the chief executive officers, strategic planning processes are being practiced in institutions that offer physical therapy programs, that this process is compatible with academic collegiality, that changes are made in policies and programs but not in the mission, that although faculty members including those from physical therapy are involved, the ...
Date: August 1990
Creator: Walker, Ann L. (Ann Lee)

Learning Style and Leadership Style: Determinants of Instructional Strategies in Nursing Education

Description: The problem of this study was to describe and compare the relationship of learning style and leadership style upon the selection of instructional strategies by nursing educators in associate and baccalaureate degree nursing programs. Data were collected using Kolb's Learning Style Inventory, Hersey and Blanchard's Leader Effectiveness and Adaptability Description, a researcher-developed Instructional Strategies Inventory, and the Personal Data Form. It was found that leadership style was highly correlated between the associate degree and baccalaureate degree faculty groups. More of the associate degree faculty members had basic leadership styles of Low Relationship/Low Task and High Task/Low Relationship. Most of the baccalaureate faculty members had Low Relationship/Low Task leadership styles. The following conclusions were developed: (a) Nursing faculty in associate and baccalaureate degree programs have similar learning and leadership styles; (b) nursing faculty tend to use the traditional instructional strategies such as lecture, discussion, and case studies at the same frequency of use? and (c) the selection of instructional strategies in nursing education may be affected by variables other than the instructor's learning and leadership styles. In view of the findings of this study, the following recommendations for further study appear to be warranted, (a) Further research should be conducted to determine the effectiveness or ineffectiveness of identified instructional strategies in nursing education, and (b) more research should be done to identify creativity in the selection of instructional strategies in nursing education. The following implications are suggested from an analysis of the data: (a) Although faculty characteristics are rarely a determining factor in the design of a nursing curriculum, they must be taken into account when selecting instructional strategies, and (b) the apparent lack of diversity in instructional strategies utilized in the classroom setting emphasizes the need for faculty to expand their knowledge base in this area.
Date: August 1990
Creator: Lilly, Vivian Collette Foreman

The Effect of the Conflict Between Instructional Leadership and Building Management Roles on Job Satisfaction of the Texas Public High School Principal

Description: The problem of this study was the conflict perceived by Texas Public High School Principals involving two roles which have been described as contradictory in nature; namely as an instructional leader and as a building manager. This study was also concerned with the level of job satisfaction of the Texas Public High School Principal. 1,205 Texas Public High School Principals identified by the Texas Education Agency and University Interscholastic League were mailed a three part questionnaire survey. 700 principals (or 58.09% of the entire population) returned the completed surveys. The questionnaire "Demographic Survey for Texas Public High School Principals" consisted of eight questions. The thirty-four statement "Questionnaire for Texas High School Principals" allowed principals to provide their perceptions of the roles and responsibilities for their present position as well as an ideal position. The final questionnaire, the four question "Survey of Job Satisfaction", assessed the level of job satisfaction for each principal. Hypothesis one was analyzed with a one-way ANOVA to determine if principals differed in their perceptions of their job roles and job positions. These positions included both the present job position and a more desired or ideal job position. The differences in these positions resulted in conflict. Hypothesis two utilized a point bi-serial correlation to find a significant difference in the number of satisfied and dissatisfied principals. Research questions one through three compared the responses from the surveys by the demographic variables. Significant differences for perceptions of instructional leadership and building management, job satisfaction, and conflict respectively were reported. A summary, findings, conclusions, implications, and recommendations for further study, conclude the dissertation. Findings of the study conclude that the more assistance a principal has, the less conflict the principal seems to have between the roles of instructional leader and building manager.
Date: August 1990
Creator: Hulen, Chris Wendell

The Professional Contributions of Ruth I. Anderson to Business Education

Description: This study explored the professional contributions of Ruth I. Anderson, retired professor of Business Administration, The University of North Texas, Denton, Texas. The data for this study were gained through questionnaire responses, a telephone interview, and personal interviews with faculty, staff, students, and business people who have worked closely with Anderson and an interview with Anderson herself. During a literature review, many of the journal articles written by Anderson were read in order to obtain insight into the thoughts and ideas Anderson had toward business education. The dissertation, divided into six chapters, begins with an introduction to the study. Chapter 1 includes the statement of the problem, purposes of the study, research questions, significance of the study, rationale for the study, and design of the study. Chapter 2 contains a biographical sketch of Ruth Anderson and offers a chronology of her career in business education. Anderson's educational philosophy is the focus of Chapter 3. Chapter 4 addresses her major accomplishments and contributions to business education. Anderson's impact on business education is the topic of Chapter 5. A summary is provided in Chapter 6. This study recognized Ruth Anderson as a significant person in the field of business education. Anderson, who was employed in the field for more than forty years, is the author, or co-author, of six books and the contributor of more than eighty articles published in professional journals. Major educational contributions of Ruth Anderson included publications, research, and involvement in professional organizations at the local, state, and national levels. Anderson made an impact on the field of business education through being a role model for former students, being a well-respected colleague, and being well known in the business education profession. Perhaps her greatest gift to the profession was her superior classroom teaching ability. Ruth Anderson's greatest contribution continues ...
Date: May 1990
Creator: Matthews, Barbara G. (Barbara Gayle)

Perceptions of Administrators and Faculty Members of a Faculty Development Plan

Description: This study was a comparison of the perceptions of administrators and faculty members regarding the actual and expected role of selected components of a faculty development plan at Srinakharinwirot University-Phitsanulok, Thailand. The study also investigated whether the demographic classifications of administrators and faculty members were related to their perceptions regarding the actual and expected role of selected components of a faculty development plan. Forty-one administrators and sixty full-time faculty members completed the survey instrument. Statistical tests used to summarize and analyze the data included mean, standard deviation, t test, chi-square, and correlation ratio. The results and findings of this study showed that (a) there were no major differences between administrators and faculty members related to their perceptions of a faculty development plan; (b) faculty members perceptions of the actual and expected role of selected components of a faculty development plan were consistent to a greater degree than were the perceptions of administrators; (c) significant differences between the perceptions of administrators regarding the actual and expected role of selected components of a faculty development plan were found for only one item: study leaves; (d) there were significant differences between the perceptions of administrators and faculty members regarding the actual role of the following components of a faculty development plan: the Center for Faculty Development, upgrading faculty members, motivation, planning implementation and evaluation, informal enrichment program, and team teaching; (e) there were significant differences between the perceptions of administrators and faculty members regarding the expected role of the following components of a faculty development plan: the Center for Faculty Development, faculty morale, and academic exchange programs in cooperation with foreign organizations. Finally, significant differences among administrators' and faculty members' perceptions were correlated with demographic classifications of gender, age, experience at Phitsanulok campus, experience in other institutions, highest degree earned, faculty affiliation, personal ...
Date: May 1990
Creator: Tawasay, Prasit

Marketing Strategies of the American Association of Bible Colleges Directed Toward Students with Nonreligious Vocational Goal

Description: The primary purpose of this study was to determine the marketing strategies for attracting students who have nonreligious vocational goals (NRVG) that are employed by Bible colleges that are either accredited or candidates for accreditation of the American Association of Bible Colleges (AABC). Primary subpurposes were to determine the AABC's interest in marketing themselves.to NRVG; practice of educational marketing strategies toward NRVG; career planning programs and placement services available to NRVG; approaching employers with placement services for NRVG; making available seminars, placement services, and alumni networking for NRVG; and difference in marketing to NRVG according to a colleges' denomination, size, three year growth pattern, and estimated percentage of NRVG. An overview of the literature pertaining to educational marketing and marketing for a liberal arts education was given. The population chosen for this study was the accredited (87) and candidate for accreditation (15) Bible colleges of the AABC (102). Eighty (78.4%) colleges actually responded. The design of this study was survey research using a mailed questionnaire as the principal source of data collection. The statistics utilized were parametric (e.g., one-way analysis of variance and t test) and nonparametric (e.g., chi square). The results of the study indicated that AABC colleges were interested in marketing themselves to students with NRVG. Many of the colleges practiced common educational marketing strategies, but much more could be done. AABC colleges offered a number of effective career Planning programs and placement services, but failed to offer several strategic programs. The Colleges have approached employers in order to place students, but not to the extent they could. AABC colleges have not served or involved their alumni to the extent they could. The marketing strategies of the AABC did not significantly differ based on a college's denomination, size, three year growth pattern, and estimated percentage of students with ...
Date: May 1990
Creator: Kane, Michael J. (Michael James), 1953-

Selected Characteristics of Minnie Stevens Piper Professors

Description: The problem of this study was the identification of selected characteristics of Minnie Stevens Piper Professors. Purposes of the study were: (a) to determine characteristics of Minnie Stevens Piper Professors, and (b) to determine whether these professors possess characteristics which typify outstanding college teachers as described by the Selection Research, Incorporated College Teacher Perceiver interview. Forty subjects, 20 from community colleges and 20 from senior colleges, were randomly selected from the 1978 through 1988 lists of Piper Professors. Fifteen community college and 11 senior college professors agreed to participate by being interviewed with the College Teacher Perceiver. This interview identified 13 characteristics, or themes, of excellent college teachers.
Date: May 1990
Creator: Goodwin, Gary D. (Gary Duane)

The Influence of the First Amendment on Academic Freedom

Description: Academic freedom has gone through three distinct eras yet each era overlaps a great deal with the one following it. The first era was the bureaucratic. It was exemplified by the negotiations between administrators and professors in the 1920s. The American Association of University Professors and the American Association of Colleges began cooperating and a hierarchical structure emerged, with the tenured professor at the top of the faculty. The second era was the political era and it was mainly a result of loyalty oaths, which began after the first World War and then escalated again during the 1930s when communism became a major concern. The political era then gave way to the legal era when the first academic freedom cases went to the United States Supreme Court in the 1950s. The first cases were the result of political pressures that became legal pressures. Most of the early court cases were based on communism. The legal era has produced changes. There are now more rights; for students and teachers of all levels, including pre-college levels, are guaranteed some academic freedom rights. However, the First Amendment and academic freedom are not synonymous because a professor usually cannot win a case based solely on his free speech rights under academic freedom. It is only when academic freedom is guaranteed through some form of due process, custom or contract—and that guarantee has been violated—that a professor normally wins a suit. There are times, too, when a professor's free speech rights have been violated and she can then win a suit based on the First Amendment, but academic freedom is not always a part of the decision. Many times academic freedom is simply used as dictum in a decision that is, in fact, based on a different part of law such as contract law, public ...
Date: May 1990
Creator: Ferdon, Douglas Robert, 1945-

A Cost-Benefit Analysis of the Implementation of Texas House Bill 72 in Selected Texas Public School Districts

Description: This study was conducted to analyze the effect of implementation of Texas House Bill 72 on budgets of selected Texas public school districts and to ascertain educational benefits to students derived from implementation of the bill as perceived by superintendents. Questionnaires were sent to superintendents of the Region 10 Education Service Center to determine perceived educational benefits to students. A demographic data sheet provided information for classifying respondents by educational experience, superintendent experience, and district enrollment classifications. Sixty-two districts responded. Official public school budget data for each district were analyzed for fiscal years 1983 through 1986 as were data from the questionnaire. Overall statistical information was gleaned through CONDESCRIPTIVE. Mean total expenditures, mean total tax rate, and state fiscal aid data were compiled, tabulated, and reported for each enrollment classification and entire sample. In addition, a t-test between the difference of two independent means at a probability level of .05 was applied. The two independent means were the averages of data for the two years prior to and after implementation of the law for expenditures, tax rates, and state fiscal contributions. Data comparing local and state expenditures were compiled, tabulated, and reported for each group to compare local and state fiscal effort prior to and after implementation. One-way analysis of variance was used to compare demographic variables with perceived educational benefits. Item and factor analyses were applied to establish reliability.
Date: May 1990
Creator: Bradford, Ronald W. (Ronald Wayne)

Inter-Rater Reliability of the Texas Teacher Appraisal System

Description: The purpose of this study was to determine the interrater reliability of the Texas Teacher Appraisal System instrument. The performance indicators, criteria, domains, and total instrument were analyzed for inter rater reliability. Five videotaped teaching episodes were viewed and scored by 557 to 881 school administrators trained to utilize the Texas Teacher Appraisal System. The fifty-five performance indicators were analyzed for simple percentage of agreement. The ten criteria, four performance domains, and) the whole instrument were analyzed utilizing Ruder-Richardson Formula 20. Indicators were judged reliable if there was 75 percent or greater agreement on four of the five videotaped exercises. Criteria, domains, and the whole instrument were judged reliable if they yielded a -Ruder-Richardson Formula 20 score of .75 or greater on four of the Based on the findings of this study, the following conclusions v/ere drawn: 1. Forty-eight of the fifty-five performance indicators were reliable in evaluation teacher performance. 2. Seven of the performance indicators were unreliable in evaluating teacher performance. 3. None of the ten performance criteria appeared to be reliable in evaluating teacher performance. 4. None of the four performance domains appeared to be reliable in evaluating teacher performance. 5. The whole instrument was reliable in evaluating teacher performance. 6. Reliability problems with the criteria and domains appeared to be an underestimate of reliability of the Kuder-Richardson Formula 20.
Date: May 1990
Creator: Crain, John Allen

Development of an Expert System to Teach Diagnostic Skills

Description: The primary purpose of the study was to develop an expert system that could C D perform medical diagnoses In selected problem areas, and C2) provide diagnostic Insights to assist medical students In their training. An expert system Is a computer-based set of procedures and algorithms that can solve problems In a given domain. Two research questions were proposed. The first was "Given a problem space defined by a matrix of diseases and symptoms, can a computer-based model be derived that will consistently perform accurate and efficient diagnoses of cases within that problem area?" The second question was "If the techniques derived from the model are taught to a medical student, is there a subsequent improvement of diagnostic skill?" An expert system was developed which met the objectives of the study. It was able to diagnose cases in the two problem areas studied with an accuracy of 94-95%. Furthermore, it was able to perform those diagnoses in a very efficient manner, often using no more than the theoretical minimum number of steps. The expert system employed three phases: rapid search by discrimination, confirmation by pattern matching against prototypes, and elimination of some candidates (impossible states) by making use of negative information. The discrimination phase alone achieved accuracies of 73-78%. By comparison, medical students achieved mean accuracies of 54-55% in the same problem areas. This suggests that novices could improve their diagnostic accuracy by approximately 20% by following the simple rules used in the first phase of the expert system. Curricular implications are discussed. When 49 first-year medical students at the Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine were exposed to some of the insights of the expert system by means of a videotaped 10- minute lecture, their diagnostic approach was modified and the accuracy of their diagnoses did improve. However, the degree ...
Date: August 1990
Creator: Elieson, S. Willard (Sanfred Willard)

Adolescent Discouragement: Development of an Assessment Instrument

Description: The Adolescent Discouragement Indicator (ADI) was developed to assess the Adlerian construct of discouragement. The 75-item ADI contains five subscales corresponding to the five life tasks specified in Individual Psychology and is specifically designed to pinpoint the area and degree of adolescent discouragement. Item selection was based on ratings by five prominent Adlerians and item correlation with subscale scores. Age and sex norms for the ADI were established on 225 females and 299 males 12 to 18 years of age. Findings indicate that female adolescents are less discouraged than male adolescents on all scales except the love scale and both sexes reported the least amount of discouragment on the love scale. The only significant difference among the age groups is between the 13-year-olds and the 15, 16, and 17-year-olds on the love scale. An internal consistency coefficient of .95, a 2-week test-retest coefficient of .89, and a 4-week test-retest coefficient of .92 indicates that the ADI is a reliable instrument. Negative and significant (p < .001) correlations between the ADI and Social Interest Index (Greever, Tseng, & Friedland, 1973) and between the ADI and the Social Interest Scale (Crandall, 1975) contribute to construct validity and support Adler's belief that discouragement and social interest are inversely related. Results of behavioral and academic comparisons on a sample of adolescent males (N=57) seem to indicate a link between behavior, academic performance, and levels of discouragement. Results of factor analysis and interscale correlations are presented. Implications for further research include continued validation using behavioral criteria associated with discouragement, refinement of the subscales and establishment of score ranges to indicate when an adolescent is considered discouraged.
Date: May 1990
Creator: Lingg, MaryAnn

An Ethnographic Study of the Use of Puppetry with a Children's Group

Description: This study utilized an ethnographic methodology to examine and describe the various aspects and processes occurring in a children's group as the members created their own puppets and accompanying puppet plays. Individual and interactive behavior patterns were isolated and analyzed as a means of gaining an in depth understanding of the puppetry process. The puppetry process, in turn, was viewed in terms of information it provided regarding the individual members and the group process. The facilitative and non-facilitative aspects of the procedure were delineated. The adult leader met with a group of six boys, in grades four and five, for 12 one-hour sessions in which they made puppets and then created puppet plays around issues that they had articulated as problems. The group sessions were videotaped and transcribed. The transcriptions were coded in an effort to extensively analyze the puppetry process and the group process, and the ways in which the two processes interacted. An independent observer/rater was utilized in order to provide some validity for the researcher's reported results. The puppet-making task appeared to offer an opportunity for individuals to begin to come together in a common, but individual task. Characteristic styles and individual personality dynamics were evidenced. General response to the task was enthusiastic, with varying degrees of satisfaction expressed regarding their finished products. The play-creating and performing process met with less success than the puppet-making. While the group members appeared to be generally amenable to contributing ideas for the puppet plays, the process met with far more resistance in the cooperative task of putting their ideas into a finished product. The group discussion and interaction that occurred around these tasks provided a vehicle by which to view levels of interpersonal skills and the group's overall stage of development. The puppets the children created appeared to act as ...
Date: August 1990
Creator: Deniger, Marcy M. (Marcy Marble)

Educational Activities at the University of Jordan in Two Decades (1962-1982)

Description: This study examined the educational activities at the University of Jordan, established in 1962, which is the oldest university in the country. The study traced the historical development of the university, which emphasizes highly-qualified graduates, and analyzed some of its educational practices. Research on this subject is limited. Jordanians have written little about their educational system, and there is little evidence of foreign scholars' interest in the subject. Some researchers argued that national pride was the main reason for establishing the university, since financial resources were not available to initiate and sustain serious research. The university started in the fall semester of 1962 with 167 students and one faculty, the Faculty of Arts. Two decades later, the university had ten faculties: Commerce and Administrative Sciences, Sciences, Medical Sciences (Medicine, Nursing, and Pharmacy), Agriculture, Education, Law, Engineering, Sharia, and Physical Education. The total number of staff continued to increase from 7 in 1962 to 627 by 1982. The size of the physical structure increased from one building to 40 buildings with approximately 18,000 square meters in 1982. As of 1982, more than 15,253 students had graduated from the university with bachelor's, master's, and diplomas-in-education degrees. In 1972, the University of Jordan changed from the yearly system to the credit-hour system, making it the first university in the region to adapt the credit-hour system. This study also provided information on students studying in Jordanian schools, students in host countries, students and faculty distribution in seven faculties, faculty demographics, research projects, degree programs, university budgets, as well as the multipurpose general secondary education examination which has no clear directive philosophy.
Date: May 1990
Creator: Sammour, Hael Y.

The Relationship of Self-Concept and Study Habits of At-Risk Students as Measured by the Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale and the Survey of Study Habits and Attitudes

Description: The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between self-concept and study habits among different subgroups of 9th grade at-risk students. The study included the administration of two independent measures: The Piers-Harris Self-Concept Scale and the Survey of Study Habits and Attitudes. Other data were self-reported by the students. The five subgroups selected in this study were: (1) male and female, (2) white and non-white, (3) socioeconomic groups determined by eligibi1ity in the Free/Reduced Lunch Program, (4) retained and non-retained students, and (5) participants and non-participants in school activities. Raw scores from the self-concept scale and study habits survey were converted into percentile scores. A correlation coefficient was calculated for each subgroup. The significance of the two correlation coefficients was tested using Fisher's Zr transformation. Of the five hypotheses tested at the .05 level, all were rejected. Major findings of the study verify other research regarding characteristics of at-risk students. Also, more than half of the subjects had deficient study habits but only a small percentage (19,5V#) had signif icant ly low self-concept scores. In addition, at-risk students who participate in school activities had higher self-concept scores and study habits scores than non-participating at-risk students. It was concluded that low self-concept does not appear to be as significant a factor of students being at risk as does their poor study habits. Recommendations were made to encourage school districts to include self-concept and study habit evaluations for at-risk students and to involve more at-risk students in school activities.
Date: August 1990
Creator: Carpenter, Robert M. (Robert Marshall)