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University of North Texas Libraries Serials Transparency List
This document represents contains information regarding subscriptions purchased by UNT Libraries, along with pricing information for the 2013-14, 2014-15, and 2015-16 fiscal years.
UNT Libraries: TRAC Conformance Document
The UNT Libraries: TRAC Conformance Document is designed to supplement and provide extended reference to the UNT Libraries’ TRAC Audit Checklist (Appendix A), which outlines the requirements of a Trusted Digital Repository. The self assessment of the UNT Libraries and its Digital Collections encompasses an evaluation of its associated policies, procedures, workflows, modelling, and technical infrastructure in the TRAC audit process.
Impediments, Partners, and Proposals: Preparing Graduate Students to Start Their Thesis and Dissertation Proposals
Presentation for the 2018 Transforming Libraries for Graduate Students Conference. This presentation shares the University of North Texas (UNT) Libraries’ experience of creating and refashioning workshops to prepare graduate students to write their dissertation or thesis proposals.
The impact of library instruction on undergraduate student success: A four-year study
Presentation at the 2018 Texas Library Association. This presentation reflects on a four-year study of data from a freshman level English composition course to examine possible correlations between participation in a library instruction session and student success.
Serenity Now! Overcoming the Fear of Negative Evaluation
Presentation for the 2018 Texas Women in Higher Education Annual Conference. This presentation discusses fear of negative evaluation (FNE), including perceptions of FNE and ways to overcome it.
Vendor Relations: Evolving Ethos & Etiquette
Presentation for the 2018 Electronic Resources & Libraries Annual Conference. This presentation discusses how you can advocate for your library while maintaining vendor relationships.
Facilitating Discovery and Use of Digital Cultural Heritage Resources with Folksonomies: A Review
This article explores the strengths and limitations of folksonomies through traditional indexing and taxonomies with an emphasis on the history of cultural heritage information retrieval.
Characteristics of Tweets about African Cultural Heritage
This article investigates broad characteristics of tweets about African cultural heritage with possible implications for marketing by cultural heritage administrators and other stakeholders.
Electronic Course Reserves, Copyright Law, and Cambridge University Press v. Becker
This document is part of a series of white papers on various copyright issues. This section revisit the current e-course reserves policy, which allows faculty members to make some readings available for electronic reserve. It uses the case from the 11th Circuit which may clarify how schools can use electronic course reserves.
Oral History Collection
Text regarding the Oral History Collection at North Texas State University. It describes the committee behind the collection and the oral history subcollections. An index of the collection begins on page 11.
University of North Texas Preservation Department Collage
Collage showing members of the University of North Texas' preservation department. A central photo shows members of the department posing together, with the surrounding photos showing each person at work with a variety of documents and devices.
The Cocktail Anthology
Book containing a variety of poems, photographs, and artwork. The book is bound with a blue ribbon that has metal stars wrapped into one end.
“The Sun told me I would be restored to life”: Native American Near- Death Experiences, Shamanism, and Religious Revitalization Movements
This article discusses near-death experiences as a central theme of Native American afterlife beliefs, and Native Americans' response to Christian missionaries. It argues that NDEs and socio-politcal factors can explain Native American religious revitalization movements and beliefs in general.
After-Death Communication: A Typology of Therapeutic Benefits
Using semi-structured interviews, the article assesses the nature of after-death communication (ADC) experience, how participants felt about it, and how it impacted their bereavement. Results revealed that participants were unanimous in believing ADC to be beneficial, and participants experienced three themes: comfort, personal and relational continuation, and personal development.
Everything Less Vast Than Love—Let Go Of
Haj Ross is an almost completely unpublished poet, and a completely amateur artist. However, since around 1970, when he discovered blending colors with artist markers, he has done more painting than poeming. In this book, he has tried to let these two of his art forms talk to, and look like, each other.
Music Copyright: Unraveling the Weirdness
This document is part of a series of white papers on various copyright issues. A copyright license is a contract to use a work in certain limited ways. Because copyright grants authors a “bundle of rights” over their works, rights holders can choose how other people can use any or all of those 11 rights without giving away their entire copyrights. They use licenses to do this. This section will address several ways that licensing is unique for music copyright and introduce four licenses that are common in this space.
3DHotbed Project 2017-2018 Update
Presentation for the 2018 Day of Digital Humanities at the University of North Texas Libraries. This presentation provides an overview of the 3D History of the Book Education (3D Hotbed) project and an update on future developments.
Preservation of Electronic Government Information (PEGI) Project
This article describes the Preservation of Electronic Government Information Project, a two-year initiative aimed at addressing national concerns around the collection and preservation of born-digital government information by cultural memory organizations for long-term public use.
Sustaining your Organization’s Future: Mentoring and Succession Planning in Libraries
Webinar for the National Network of Libraries of Medicine. This presentation discusses results of a recent survey of librarians on the prevalence of succession and mentoring plans in academic, public, school, and special libraries, and includes conclusions, best practices, and takeaways for increased mentoring and succession planning
Fostering Connections: Creating an IR Managers Forum
Presentation at the 20th International Symposium on Electronic Theses and Dissertations. This presentation discusses the creation of the IR Managers Forum.
Electronic Resources Evaluation Rubric
Rubric used to evaluate electronic resources for acquisition.
End of Term 2016 Presidential Web Archive
This article presents an overview of the End of Term 2016 Presidential Web Archive conducted at the end of the second Obama presidential term. It presents the workflow for this collaborative project as well as lessons learned.
University of North Texas Manifesto: Expectations for Vendors of Library Collections
Manifesto describing expectations for library collection vendors.
Contract and License Review Checklist
Checklist used to review contracts and licenses against state, library, and legal review policies.
Discovering What’s between the Dashes with The Portal to Texas History
This article describe the use of The Portal to Texas History for Texas genealogical research.
Utilizing Transgender Patient Health Care Experiences To Address Future Physicians' Gaps In Knowledge
This poster describes a project to create a free, open-access, web-based curriculum designed to educate medical students and residents on how to give compassionate care to disadvantaged populations who are in great need of consistent, stigma-free, and socially informed health care.
3D Printing Book History: Extending Bibliographical Pedagogy Through Additive Manufacturing
Presented at the 2017 Day of Digital Humanities. This presentation provides an overview of the 3Dhotbed project to extend bibliographical pedagogy through additive manufacturing.
3Dhotbed
Presented at the 2017 Code4Lib South Central Conference. This presentation provides an overview of the 3Dhobed project, including the process of 3D scanning, modeling, and printing hand moulds for book history instruction.
Assessing an Academic Library Professional Development Program
This article describes how measures of need, participation, satisfaction, and impact are employed to assess many aspects of a professional development program in a large academic library.
Teaching Poe in the Context of the ACRL’s Framework for Information Literacy
Presented at the 2017 American Literature Association, in a session organized by the Poe Studies Association. This presentation discusses how the Association of College and Research Libraries Framework for Information Literacy can be used as a pedagogical basis for teaching the works of Edgar Allan Poe.
Comics in Academia
Panel presented at the 2017 Comicpalooza. This panel discusses comics in academia through the lens of library exhibitions and programing, combining comics and textbooks, and the use of comics as a new rhetorical and multimodal method for exploring narrative.
Joining Forces to Jumpstart Student Success in Higher Education
Presentation for the 2017 Cross Timbers Library Collaborative Annual Conference. This presentation describes their partnerships with support services and academic departments that have facilitated services for undergraduate and graduate students.
UNT Libraries: Building Collections and Collaborations
Presentation for the 2017 Symposium on Developing Infrastructure for Computational Resources on South Asian Languages. This presentation provides an overview of digital preservation collections in the UNT Digital Library.
Accidental Activists: Mark Phariss, Vic Holmes, and Their Fight for Marriage Equality in Texas
In early 2013 same-sex marriage was legal in only ten states and the District of Columbia. That year the Supreme Court’s decision in United States v. Windsor appeared to open the door to marriage equality. In Texas, Mark Phariss and Vic Holmes, together for sixteen years and deeply in love, wondered why no one had stepped across the threshold to challenge their state’s 2005 constitutional amendment prohibiting same-sex marriage. They agreed to join a lawsuit being put together by Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLD. Two years later—after tense battles in the Federal District Court for the Western District of Texas and in the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals, after sitting through oral arguments at the Supreme Court of the United States in Obergefell v. Hodges—they won the right to marry deep in the heart of Texas. But the road they traveled was never easy. Accidental Activists is the deeply moving story of two men who struggled to achieve the dignity of which Justice Anthony Kennedy spoke in a series of Supreme Court decisions that recognized the “personhood,” the essential humanity of gays and lesbians. Author David Collins tells Mark and Vic’s story in the context of legal and social history and explains the complex legal issues and developments surrounding same-sex marriage in layman’s terms.
Death on the Lonely Llano Estacado: The Assassination of J. W. Jarrott, a Forgotten Hero
In the winter of 1901, James W. Jarrott led a band of twenty-five homesteader families toward the Llano Estacado in far West Texas, newly opened for settlement by a populist Texas legislature. But frontier cattlemen who had been pasturing their herds on the unfenced prairie land were enraged by the encroachment of these “nesters.” In August 1902 a famous hired assassin, Jim Miller, ambushed and murdered J. W. Jarrott. Who hired Miller? This crime has never been solved, until now. Award-winning author Bill Neal investigates this cold case and successfully pieces together all the threads of circumstantial evidence to fit the noose snugly around the neck of Jim Miller’s employer. What emerges from these pages is the strength of intriguing characters in an engrossing narrative: Jim Jarrott, the diminutive advocate who fearlessly champions the cause of the little guy. The ruthless and slippery assassin, Deacon Jim Miller. And finally Jarrott’s young widow Mollie, who perseveres and prospers against great odds and tells the settlers to “Stay put!”
On the Jury Trial: Principles and Practices for Effective Advocacy
Two outstanding Texas trial lawyers—one now an equally respected district judge—have written On the Jury Trial, a “must have” reference for any trial lawyer aspiring to excellence or seeking to maintain it. Chapter topics include voir dire, opening statement, preparing witnesses, cross examination, using exhibits, closing argument, jury research, and more, with excellent examples and “do’s and don’ts” provided throughout. Think of this book as the senior law partner’s memo to associates on how to really try a case. Looking for fly-on-the-wall insight into world-class trial preparation and strategy? Here it is. A behind-the-scenes tour of the inner workings of the judicial process? This book has you covered. Its combination of advice, illustration, and commentary is every bit as valuable as it is unique. Every litigator should have this book on the shelf, no matter the state in which they practice.
Yesterday There Was Glory: With the 4th Division, A.E.F., in World War I
In 1946, World War I veteran and self-described “buck private in the rear rank” Gerald Andrew Howell finished a memoir of the experiences of his squad from the 39th Infantry Regiment, 4th Division, and their “moments of horror, tragedy, humor, amour, [and] promiscuity” in Europe. This was “the old Army as it used to be,” Howell explains—the saga of the “down-trodden doughboy.” A few months later Howell was dead, his manuscript unpublished. Jeffrey Patrick discovered the memoir and the author’s correspondence with publishers and took on the task of bringing it to publication at last. Yesterday There Was Glory is an unpretentious account of men at war, from training camp to the occupation of Germany. It includes graphic descriptions of the battlefield, of shell fire, gas attacks, and lice. “Between the attacks the men would lay in their wet holes and pray for relief. But no relief came,” Howell remembers. He recalls much more than the horrors of combat, however, chronicling the diverse collection of heroes, professional warriors, shirkers, and braggarts that made up the American Expeditionary Forces. Howell and his comrades longed for wounds that would allow them to escape the war, but resolutely engaged the Germans in hand-to-hand combat. They poked fun at their comrades, but were willing to share their last can of food. They endured difficult marches, pursued “mademoiselles” and “frauleins,” and even staged a “strike” to protest mistreatment by their officers. They were as “ribald as any soldiery in any army,” Howell admits, but “underneath this veneer, they were really patriotic, steadfast and sincere.” Patrick provides an editor’s introduction and annotations to explain terms and sources in the memoir. Howell’s account preserves the flavor of army life with conversations and banter in soldier language, including the uncensored doughboy profanity often heard but seldom recorded. His ...
We Were Going to Win, or Die There: with the Marines at Guadalcanal, Tarawa, and Saipan
In 1940, native West Texan Roy H. Elrod joined the Marine Corps. A few years later his unit, the 8th Marine Regiment, went into the fight at Guadalcanal, where he commanded a platoon of 37 mm gunners. They endured Japanese attacks, malarial tropical weather, and starvation rations. His combat leadership earned him a Silver Star and a battlefield promotion. On D-Day at Tarawa his platoon waded their 37 mm cannons ashore, each weighing nearly 1,000 pounds, through half a mile of bullet-laced surf to get to an island where the killing never stopped. His was the only platoon to get its guns ashore and into action that first day. At Saipan, Elrod commanded a platoon of 75 mm half tracks, but he was riddled with shrapnel from an enemy artillery shell that took him out of the war. Fred H. Allison interviewed Elrod, drew upon wartime letters home, and provided annotations to the narrative of this young Marine infantry officer, a job that had an extremely low survival potential.
ActivAmerica
Drawing from fairy tales, ghost stories, and science-fiction, the stories in ActivAmerica explore how we confront (and exert) power and re-imagine ourselves through sports and athletic activities. A group of girls starts an illicit hockey league in a conservative suburb. A recently separated woman must run a mile a day in order to maintain her new corporate health insurance. Children impacted by environmental disaster create a “mutant soccer team.” Two sisters are visited by an Olympic gymnast who demands increasingly dangerous moves from them. Sports allow the characters to form communities on soccer fields and hidden lakes, in overgrown backyards and across Ping-Pong tables. Throughout the collection, however, athletic risk also comes with unexpected, often unsettling results.
Texas Rangers: Lives, Legend, and Legacy
Authors Bob Alexander and Donaly E. Brice grappled with several issues when deciding how to relate a general history of the Texas Rangers. Should emphasis be placed on their frontier defense against Indians, or focus more on their role as guardians of the peace and statewide law enforcers? What about the tumultuous Mexican Revolution period, 1910-1920? And how to deal with myths and legends such as One Riot, One Ranger? Texas Rangers: Lives, Legend, and Legacy is the authors’ answer to these questions, a one-volume history of the Texas Rangers. The authors begin with the earliest Rangers in the pre-Republic years in 1823 and take the story up through the Republic, Mexican War, and Civil War. Then, with the advent of the Frontier Battalion, the authors focus in detail on each company A through F, relating what was happening within each company concurrently. Thereafter, Alexander and Brice tell the famous episodes of the Rangers that forged their legend, and bring the story up through the twentieth century to the present day in the final chapters.
The Ranger Ideal
Established in Waco in 1968, the Texas Ranger Hall of Fame and Museum honors the iconic Texas Rangers, a service which has existed, in one form or another, since 1823. They have become legendary symbols of Texas and the American West. Thirty-one Rangers, with lives spanning more than two centuries, have been enshrined in the Hall of Fame. In The Ranger Ideal Volume 1: Texas Rangers in the Hall of Fame, 1823-1861, Darren L. Ivey presents capsule biographies of the seven inductees who served Texas before the Civil War. He begins with Stephen F. Austin, “the Father of Texas,” who laid the foundations of the Ranger service, and then covers John C. Hays, Ben McCulloch, Samuel H. Walker, William A. A. “Bigfoot” Wallace, John S. Ford, and Lawrence Sul Ross. Using primary records and reliable secondary sources, and rejecting apocryphal tales, The Ranger Ideal presents the true stories of these intrepid men who fought to tame a land with gallantry, grit, and guns. This Volume 1 is the first of a planned three-volume series covering all of the Texas Rangers inducted into the Hall of Fame and Museum in Waco, Texas.
Exploring the Process of Developing a Glocally Focused Art Curriculum for Two Communities
The world is becoming progressively interconnected through technology, politics, culture, economics, and education. As educators we strive to provide instruction that prepares students to become active members of both their local and global communities. This dissertation presents one possible avenue for engaging students with art and multifaceted ideas about culture, community, and politics as it explores the possibilities for creating a community-based, art education curriculum that seeks a merger of global and local, or "glocal" thinking. Through curriculum action research, I explored the process of writing site-specific curriculum that focuses on publicly available, local works of art and encourages a connection between global experiences and local application. I have completed this research for two communities, one in Ohio and one in Texas, and investigated the similarities and differences that exist in the process and resulting curriculum for each location. Through textual analysis, interviews, curriculum writing, and personal reflections, I identified five essential components of a community-based, glocal art education curriculum: flexibility, authenticity, connectedness, glocal understandings, and publicly available art. Additionally, I developed a template for writing glocally focused, community-based art education curriculum and produced completed curricular units for each of the communities. Finally, I have made suggestions for the future study and development of glocally focused, art education curriculum.
17 USC 108(h): The “Last Twenty Years” Exception
This document is part of a series of white papers on various copyright issues. One statute, 17 USC § 108, provides a number of exceptions specifically for libraries. In addition to fair use, there are a variety of other exceptions built into the copyright law that don’t get as much attention.This paper specifically addresses one of 108’s lesser-used provisions and the value it may hold for libraries and archives: 108(h).
17 USC 109: The First Sale Doctrine
This document is part of a series of white papers on various copyright issues. One statute, 17 USC § 109, provides a number of exceptions specifically for libraries. In addition to fair use, there are a variety of other exceptions built into the copyright law that don’t get as much attention.This paper argues that as there is no digital first sale, libraries can continue to use 17 USC ​§ ​109 for physical collections and are safe to lend the books they own without worrying about copyright problems.
Bureaucracy: A Love Story
Bureaucracy usually only becomes visible when it stops working—when a system fails, when an event gets off schedule, when someone points to a problem or glitch in a carefully calibrated workflow. But Bureaucracy: A Love Story draws together research done by scholars and students in the Special Collections at the University of North Texas to illuminate how bureaucracy structures our contemporary lives across a range of domains. People have navigated bureaucracy for centuries, by creating and utilizing various literary and rhetorical forms—from indexes to alphabetization to diagrams to blanks—that made it possible to efficiently process large amounts of information. Contemporary bureaucracy is likewise concerned with how to collect and store information, to circulate it efficiently, and to allow for easy access. We are interested both in the conventional definition of bureaucracy as a form of ordering and control connected to institutions and the state, but we also want to uncover how people interacted—often in creative ways—with the material forms of bureaucracy.
Evaluation of Call Mobility on Network Productivity in Long Term Evolution Advanced (LTE-A) Femtocells
The demand for higher data rates for indoor and cell-edge users led to evolution of small cells. LTE femtocells, one of the small cell categories, are low-power low-cost mobile base stations, which are deployed within the coverage area of the traditional macro base station. The cross-tier and co-tier interferences occur only when the macrocell and femtocell share the same frequency channels. Open access (OSG), closed access (CSG), and hybrid access are the three existing access-control methods that decide users' connectivity to the femtocell access point (FAP). We define a network performance function, network productivity, to measure the traffic that is carried successfully. In this dissertation, we evaluate call mobility in LTE integrated network and determine optimized network productivity with variable call arrival rate in given LTE deployment with femtocell access modes (OSG, CSG, HYBRID) for a given call blocking vector. The solution to the optimization is maximum network productivity and call arrival rates for all cells. In the second scenario, we evaluate call mobility in LTE integrated network with increasing femtocells and maximize network productivity with variable femtocells distribution per macrocell with constant call arrival rate in uniform LTE deployment with femtocell access modes (OSG, CSG, HYBRID) for a given call blocking vector. The solution to the optimization is maximum network productivity and call arrival rates for all cells for network deployment where peak productivity is identified. We analyze the effects of call mobility on network productivity by simulating low, high, and no mobility scenarios and study the impact based on offered load, handover traffic and blocking probabilities. Finally, we evaluate and optimize performance of fractional frequency reuse (FFR) mechanism and study the impact of proposed metric weighted user satisfaction with sectorized FFR configuration.
Attachment, Coping, and Psychiatric Symptoms among Military Veterans and Active Duty Personnel: A Path Analysis Study
The purpose of this study was to examine the role of attachment processes and coping strategies in the development of psychiatric symptoms among military veterans and active duty personnel. Data were obtained from 268 male and female military veterans and active duty personnel. A path analysis was conducted to estimate the relationships between attachment processes, coping strategies, and psychiatric symptoms. Findings demonstrated that greater levels of attachment anxiety were related to increased levels of avoidant coping and psychiatric symptoms, while higher levels of attachment avoidance were related to avoidant coping and PTSD symptoms, as well as decreased levels of problem-focused coping. Alcohol use was associated with psychiatric symptoms. Avoidant coping, but not problem-focused coping, was associated with psychiatric symptoms and partially mediated the relationship between anxious attachment and psychiatric symptoms. Avoidant coping also fully or partially mediated the relationships of avoidant attachment to depression and PTSD symptoms. The findings of this study increase our knowledge of mechanisms that contribute to psychiatric symptoms among military populations, which in turn can guide treatment planning and interventions.
Service Honest and Faithful: The Thirty-Third Volunteer Infantry Regiment in the Philippine War, 1899-1901
This manuscript is a study of the Thirty-Third Infantry, United States Volunteers, a regiment that was recruited in Texas, the South, and the Midwest and was trained by officers experienced from the Indian Wars and the Spanish-American War. This regiment served as a front-line infantry unit and then as a constabulary force during the Philippine War from 1899 until 1901. While famous in the United States as a highly effective infantry regiment during the Philippine War, the unit's fame and the lessons that it offered American war planners faded in time and were overlooked in favor of conventional fighting. In addition, the experiences of the men of the regiment belie the argument that the Philippine War was a brutal and racist imperial conflict akin to later interventions such as the Vietnam War. An examination of the Thirty-Third Infantry thus provides valuable context into a war not often studied in the United States and serves as a successful example of a counterinsurgency.
The Experience of Language Use for Second Generation, Bilingual, Mexican American, 5th Grade Students
There is a paucity of research regarding language use among bilingual clients, particularly with Latino children. In order to provide culturally sensitive counseling for bilingual, Spanish-speaking, Latino children it is important to understand their experience of language use. The purpose of this study was to investigate how second generation, bilingual, Mexican American, 5th grade students experience language use in the two languages with which they communicate. I employed a phenomenological method to data collection and analysis and conducted semi-structured individual and group interviews with three boys and five girls (N = 8). Analysis of the individual and group interviews yielded four main structures: (a) dominant language determined perception of developing dual selves, (b) speaking two languages useful in language brokering and upward mobility, (c) dominant language determined experience of language use, and (d) language use and aspects of the complementarity principle. Findings from this study suggest that bilingual Latino children experience language brokering for their parents as difficult, speaking two languages as useful regarding upward mobility, and that their dominant language influences various aspects of their daily experiences such as with whom and where they use each language. Limitations to this research include insufficient time building rapport with participants and challenges related to unexplored dimensions of bilingualism in the counseling research literature. An overarching implication for future research, clinical practice, and counselor education is that bilingualism, language use, and the depth of experience of Latino children are largely understudied topics.
Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Structure and Properties of Boron Containing Oxide Glasses: Empirical Potential Development and Applications
Potential parameters that can handle multi-component oxide glass systems especially boron oxide are very limited in literature. One of the main goals of my dissertation is to develop empirical potentials to simulate multi-component oxide glass systems with boron oxide. Two approaches, both by introducing the composition dependent parameter feature, were taken and both led to successful potentials for boron containing glass systems after extensive testing and fitting. Both potential sets can produce reasonable glass structures of the multi-component oxide glass systems, with structure and properties in good agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, we have tested the simulation settings such as system size and cooling rate effects on the results of structures and properties of MD simulated borosilicate glasses. It was found that increase four-coordinated boron with decreasing cooling rate and system size above 1000 atoms is necessary to produce converged structure. Another application of the potentials is to simulate a six-component nuclear waste glass, international simple glass (ISG), which was for first time simulated using the newly developed parameters. Structural features obtained from simulations agree well with the experimental results. In addition, two series of sodium borosilicate and boroaluminosilicate glasses were simulated with the two sets of potentials to compare and evaluate their applicability and deficiency. Various analyses on the structures and properties such as pair distribution function, total correlation function, coordination number analysis, Qn distribution function, ring size distribution function, vibrational density of states and mechanical properties were performed. This work highlights the challenge of MD simulations of boron containing glasses and the capability of the new potential parameters that enable simulations of wide range of mixed former glasses to investigate new structure features and design of new glass compositions for various applications.