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Notre Dame Cathedral Fire Dataset

Description: This dataset contains Twitter JSON data for Tweets related to the fire at Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, France. This dataset was created using the twarc (https://github.com/edsu/twarc) package that makes use of Twitter's search API. A total of 8,046,185 Tweets and 163,055 media files make up the combined dataset.
Date: 2019-04-08/2019-04-29
Creator: Phillips, Mark Edward

Building a Trusted Framework for Coordinating OA Monograph Usage Data

Description: Presentation for the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI) Spring 2019 Membership Meeting. The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation recently funded a study of the landscape of usage data for open-access scholarly monographs and an investigation of the viability of creating a data trust for the sharing of usage data among stakeholders in the publishing ecosystem. In spring 2019, the Book Industry Study Group will publish a final white paper that takes into account feedback from the community during a consultation period. This presentation will provide a summary of the main findings and proposals of the forthcoming white paper.
Date: April 8, 2019
Creator: Hawkins, Kevin S.

The Engaged Subject Librarian

Description: Presentation for the UNT Libraries Subject Librarian Workgroup August 2018 Meeting. This presentation recaps the presentation "Transforming Liaison Services at the UNT Libraries: Deconstructing and Reconstructing Library Liaisonship" from the 2018 Cross Timbers Library Collaborative annual conference for an internal audience.
Date: August 30, 2018
Creator: Condrey, Coby & Leuzinger, Julie

Monitoring Usage of Open Access Long-Form Content

Description: Presentation for NISO Virtual Conference "Long Form Content: Ebooks, Print Volumes and the Concerns of Those Who Use Both." The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation recently funded a study of the landscape of usage data for open-access scholarly monographs and an investigation of the viability of creating a data trust for sharing of usage data among stakeholders in the publishing ecosystem. In spring 2019, the Book Industry Study Group (BISG) will publish a final white paper that takes into account feedback from the community during a consultation period. This presentation, part of a NISO virtual conference (https://www.niso.org/events/2019/03/long-form-content-ebooks-print-volumes-and-concerns-those-who-use-both ), provides a summary of the main findings and proposals of the forthcoming white paper.
Date: March 20, 2019
Creator: Hawkins, Kevin S.

How Should You Publish?

Description: Presentation for the "Building an Open Textbook Publishing Program", the Open Textbook Publishing Winter Webinar Series 2019. This presentation focuses on the high-level decisions necessary when deciding how to offer a publishing service.
Date: February 20, 2019
Creator: Hawkins, Kevin S.

How Should You Publish?

Description: Recording of "Building an Open Textbook Publishing Program", the Open Textbook Publishing Winter Webinar Series 2019. This presentation focuses on the high-level decisions necessary when deciding how to offer a publishing service.
Date: February 20, 2019
Creator: Hawkins, Kevin S.

Identifying Gaps in Tools and Interfaces for Assessing Metadata Quality

Description: This paper discusses qualitative research conducted by the University of North Texas (UNT) Libraries regarding perceptions of quality by metadata creators and their managers. These perceptions of metadata quality are intended to identify gaps in tools and interfaces used to create metadata.
Date: February 19, 2019
Creator: Fox, Nathaniel T.; Tarver, Hannah & Phillips, Mark Edward

Allowing Students to Have VOICES [Voluntary Options in Chemical Education Schedules] in General Chemistry I

Description: The purpose of this investigation (a quasi-experimental design called a non-equivalent design group (NEDG)) was to determine if allowing students in a science majors general Chemistry I course the choice in establishing the due dates that their homework was due to the instructor would improve course averages. This study covered two semesters with a total of 288 students participating with n = 158 in the fall and n = 130 in the spring. The students self-selected the homework group, VOICES, that best fit his/her needs which included (1) the instructor's homework schedule, (2) a student-customized schedule or a schedule that followed the exam schedule, or (3) all homework due by the last class day prior to the final exam. Online homework was assigned and graded with individual assignment and homework average grades collected and analyzed. No statistically significant differences were found among the VOICES groups with respect to final course average. Other results of this study replicated findings in the literature; namely, that there is a higher correlation between mathematics skills and course success. Course averages of students who had completed Calculus I or higher were statistically significantly higher than students with less completed mathematics coursework in all VOICES groups. Also, the percentage of successful students in the on-sequence semester (fall) was higher than the percentage of students in the off-sequence semester (spring). No differences were seen in any VOICES group's student demographics or high school chemistry preparation.
Date: December 2018
Creator: Ford, Robyn Lynn

Paralegal Students' and Paralegal Instructors' Perceptions of Synchronous and Asynchronous Online Paralegal Course Effectiveness: A Comparative Study

Description: To improve online learning pedagogy within the field of paralegal education, this study investigated how paralegal students and paralegal instructors perceived the effectiveness of synchronous and asynchronous online paralegal courses. Survey results were analyzed using independent samples t-test and correlational analysis, and indicated that overall, paralegal students and paralegal instructors positively perceived synchronous and asynchronous online paralegal courses. Paralegal instructors reported statistically significant higher perceptions than paralegal students: (1) of instructional design and course content in synchronous online paralegal courses; and (2) of technical assistance, communication, and course content in asynchronous online paralegal courses. Instructors also reported higher perceptions of the effectiveness of universal design, online instructional design, and course content in synchronous online paralegal courses than in asynchronous online paralegal courses. Paralegal students reported higher perceptions of asynchronous online paralegal course effectiveness regarding universal design than paralegal instructors. No statistically significant differences existed between paralegal students' perceptions of the effectiveness of synchronous and asynchronous online paralegal courses. A strong, negative relationship existed between paralegal students' age and their perceptions of effective synchronous paralegal courses, which were statistically and practically significant. Statistically significant relationships existed between paralegal instructors' perceptions of effective synchronous online paralegal course and the number of courses taught by the paralegal instructor. Lastly, this study provided practical applicability and opportunities for future research.
Date: December 2018
Creator: Farmer, Shelley Kristine

Development of an Observation System to Measure Narratives of a Teaching Interaction

Description: Having a measurable way to analyze how staff members describe teaching interactions is important for staff training and building a community of effective and caring practice. The purpose of this project, part of a larger program, is to develop a measurement system that captures descriptions of connected events (narratives) during teaching interactions. This project involved development of a reliable measurement system that discriminates between experienced and novice narratives of teaching interactions (contingency arrangements) across multiple cases of instruction. The participants were employees of a non-profit agency serving children with autism and their families. They volunteered to participate in the study. The development of the code included the systematic selection of high quality autism intervention video clips and asking participants to view the clips and describe events, and then coding responses. The participant narratives were then categorized by themes and analyzed. The results are described in the context of usefulness and limitations of the measurement systems. A mutielement design comparing responses across stimulus conditions was used to evaluate the sensitivity of the measurement system in discriminating between novice and experienced interventionists.
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: December 2018
Creator: Hines, Dalai C

The Effects of an Instructional Package on the Emergence of Novel Intraverbals in Children with Autism

Description: We evaluated the effects of an instructional package on the emergence of novel intraverbals in children diagnosed with autism. Participants were two boys with a diagnosis of autism who had tact and listener repertoires for common objects and events, some intraverbal responses, and showed an ability to learn new intraverbal responses through direct instruction prior to participating in the study. Tact training, listener training, sorting training, and mixed training (listener and tact training) were conducted with each participant, with a probe to test for emergent intraverbals following each training step. If some emergence was seen during a probe following a training step, probes were conducted with the remaining sets to test for emergence in those sets as well. Multiple-exemplar training was conducted following the training steps if all targets within a set did not meet the criterion for emergence during probes. Results showed that for one participant, all four training steps, in addition to multiple-exemplar training, were needed to see emergence in all targets during probes for two sets, with the last two sets requiring only tact training before all targets had emerged during probes. The second participant required only tact training during three sets, with listener training required for one target in one set before all targets in all sets emerged during probes.
Date: December 2018
Creator: Macias, Heather A

A Control Theoretic Approach for Resilient Network Services

Description: Resilient networks have the ability to provide the desired level of service, despite challenges such as malicious attacks and misconfigurations. The primary goal of this dissertation is to be able to provide uninterrupted network services in the face of an attack or any failures. This dissertation attempts to apply control system theory techniques with a focus on system identification and closed-loop feedback control. It explores the benefits of system identification technique in designing and validating the model for the complex and dynamic networks. Further, this dissertation focuses on designing robust feedback control mechanisms that are both scalable and effective in real-time. It focuses on employing dynamic and predictive control approaches to reduce the impact of an attack on network services. The closed-loop feedback control mechanisms tackle this issue by degrading the network services gracefully to an acceptable level and then stabilizing the network in real-time (less than 50 seconds). Employing these feedback mechanisms also provide the ability to automatically configure the settings such that the QoS metrics of the network is consistent with those specified in the service level agreements.
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: December 2018
Creator: Vempati, Jagannadh Ambareesh

Influence of Social Media on Decision Making of the Kuwait National Assembly Members: Case Study

Description: In Kuwait, an increase in the use of social media by the Kuwait National Assembly (KNA) has allowed it members to reach out to the public and so advance their political agenda. This study examines social media influences on the decision making process; addresses the lack of academic research in relation to KNA members; and seeks to understand the extent to which public political engagement using social media might affect the outcome of their decision making. The proposed social media influence model (SMIM) was used to explore the relationships and relative importance of variables influencing legislator decision making in a social media environment. The second decade of the twenty-first century saw a number of major issues emerging in Kuwait. A core mixed method design known as explanatory sequential was applied to multiple sets of data generated during KNA members' 14th (2013-2016) and 15th (2016-2018) terms. These data included Twitter messages (tweets), the KNA Information Center Parliamentary Information System legislation documents, and the news media articles. The sample was drawn from KNA membership, some of which used Twitter to comment on major events with specific hashtags and the Kuwaiti news media articles related to the same. Study results confirm and support the proposed SMIM. They also suggest that a single person or a group of individuals (in this case, legislators) can be influenced and motivated to use social media for self-promotion and/or advancing their political agenda. Consequently, they can be used to devise ways for improving the use of social media by KNA members in support of legislative work, which in turn will provide citizens with access to real-time information and enhanced political interaction.
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: December 2018
Creator: Alfarhoud, Yousef T.

Where are the Women in the Ebola Crisis? An Analysis of Gendered Reporting and the Information Behavior Patterns of Journalists Covering a Health Outbreak

Description: Health officials estimate that the 2014 Ebola crisis disproportionately victimized women, who made up 75% of the disease's victims. This interdisciplinary study has two main goals. The first is to evaluate the news media's performance in relation to their representation of women caught up in the Ebola crisis because the media play an important role in influencing public responses to health. This study sought to understand the information behavior patterns of journalists who covered the Ebola crisis by analyzing how job tasks influence a journalist's information behavior. This study employed qualitative methods to study the perceptions of journalists who covered the 2014 Ebola outbreak. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with Liberian and American journalists who covered the outbreak to understand the choices that guided their reporting of the Ebola crisis. A content analysis of The New York Times, The Times, and The Inquirer was also conducted to examine the new media's representation of women in an outbreak which mostly victimized women. The findings suggest that covering a dangerous assignment like Ebola affected the information behavior patterns of journalists. Audience needs, the timing of coverage, fear, and the accessibility of sources, were some of the factors that influenced the news gathering decisions taken by the reporters. The findings also suggest that women were mostly underrepresented by the media as sources, experts and subjects.
Date: December 2018
Creator: Mumah, Jenny N

Improving Photovoltaic Panel Efficiency by Cooling Water Circulation

Description: This thesis aims to increase photovoltaic (PV) panel power efficiency by employing a cooling system based on water circulation, which represents an improved version of water flow based active cooling systems. Theoretical calculations involved finding the heat produced by the PV panel and the circulation water flow required to remove this heat. A data logger and a cooling system for a test panel of 20W was designed and employed to study the relationship between the PV panel surface temperature and its output power. This logging and cooling system includes an Arduino microcontroller extended with a data logging shield, temperature sensing probes, current sensors, and a DC water pump. Real-time measurements were logged every minute for one or two day periods under various irradiance and air temperature conditions. For these experiments, a load resistance was chosen to operate the test panel at its maximum power point. Results indicate that the cooling system can yield an improvement of 10% in power production. Based on the observations from the test panel experiments, a cooling system was devised for a PV panel array of 640 W equipped with a commercial charge controller. The test data logger was repurposed for this larger system. An identical PV array was left uncooled and monitored simultaneously to compare the effect of cooling, demonstrating that the cooled array provided up to an extra 132W or 20% of maximum power for sunny weather conditions. Future expansion possibilities of the project include automated water level monitoring system and water filtration systems.
Date: December 2018
Creator: Joseph, Jyothis