UNT Libraries - 12 Matching Results

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Independent Quadtrees

Description: This dissertation deals with the problem of manipulating and storing an image using quadtrees. A quadtree is a tree in which each node has four ordered children or is a leaf. It can be used to represent an image via hierarchical decomposition. The image is broken into four regions. A region can be a solid color (homogeneous) or a mixture of colors (heterogeneous). If a region is heterogeneous it is broken into four subregions, and the process continues recursively until all subregions are homogeneous. The traditional quadtree suffers from dependence on the underlying grid. The grid coordinate system is implicit, and therefore fixed. The fixed coordinate system implies a rigid tree. A rigid tree cannot be translated, scaled, or rotated. Instead, a new tree must be built which is the result of one of these transformations. This dissertation introduces the independent quadtree. The independent quadtree is free of any underlying coordinate system. The tree is no longer rigid and can be easily translated, scaled, or rotated. Algorithms to perform these operations axe presented. The translation and rotation algorithms take constant time. The scaling algorithm has linear time in the number nodes in the tree. The disadvantage of independent quadtrees is the longer generation and display time. This dissertation also introduces an alternate method of hierarchical decomposition. This new method finds the largest homogeneous block with respect to the corners of the image. This block defines the division point for the decomposition. If the size of the block is below some cutoff point, it is deemed to be to small to make the overhead worthwhile and the traditional method is used instead. This new method is compared to the traditional method on randomly generated rectangles, triangles, and circles. The new method is shown to use significantly less space for all three ...
Date: December 1986
Creator: Atwood, Larry D. (Larry Dale)

A Graphical, Database-Querying Interface for Casual, Naive Computer Users

Description: This research is concerned with some aspects of the retrieval of information from database systems by casual, naive computer users. A "casual user" is defined as an individual who only wishes to execute queries perhaps once or twice a month, and a "naive user" is someone who has little or no expertise in operating a computer and, more specifically for the purposes of this study, is not practiced at querying a database. The research initially focuses on a specific group of casual, naive users, namely a group of clinicians, and analyzes their characteristics as they pertain to the retrieval of information from a computer database. The characteristics thus elicited are then used to create the requirements for a database interface that would, potentially, be acceptable to this group. An interface having the desired requirements is then proposed. This interface consists, from a user's perspective, of three basic components. A graphical model gives a picture of the database structure. Windows give the ability to view different areas of the database, physically group together items that come under one logical heading and provide the user with immediate access to the data item names used by the system. Finally, a natural language query language provides a means of entering a query in a syntax (that of ordinary English) which is familiar to the user. The graphical model is a logical abstraction of the database. Unlike other database interfaces, it is not constrained by the model (relational, hierarchical, network) underlying the database management system, with the one caveat that the graphical model should not imply any connections which cannot be supported by the management system. Versions of the interface are implemented on both eight-bit and sixteen-bit microcomputers, and testing is conducted in order to validate the acceptability of the interface and to discover the ...
Date: August 1985
Creator: Burgess, Clifford G. (Clifford Grenville)

Computer Realization of Human Music Cognition

Description: This study models the human process of music cognition on the digital computer. The definition of music cognition is derived from the work in music cognition done by the researchers Carol Krumhansl and Edward Kessler, and by Mari Jones, as well as from the music theories of Heinrich Schenker. The computer implementation functions in three stages. First, it translates a musical "performance" in the form of MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) messages into LISP structures. Second, the various parameters of the performance are examined separately a la Jones's joint accent structure, quantified according to psychological findings, and adjusted to a common scale. The findings of Krumhansl and Kessler are used to evaluate the consonance of each note with respect to the key of the piece and with respect to the immediately sounding harmony. This process yields a multidimensional set of points, each of which is a cognitive evaluation of a single musical event within the context of the piece of music within which it occurred. This set of points forms a metric space in multi-dimensional Euclidean space. The third phase of the analysis maps the set of points into a topology-preserving data structure for a Schenkerian-like middleground structural analysis. This process yields a hierarchical stratification of all the musical events (notes) in a piece of music. It has been applied to several pieces of music with surprising results. In each case, the analysis obtained very closely resembles a structural analysis which would be supplied by a human theorist. The results obtained invite us to take another look at the representation of knowledge and perception from another perspective, that of a set of points in a topological space, and to ask if such a representation might not be useful in other domains. It also leads us to ask if such a ...
Date: August 1988
Creator: Albright, Larry E. (Larry Eugene)

Semaphore Solutions for General Mutual Exclusion Problems

Description: Automatic generation of starvation-free semaphore solutions to general mutual exclusion problems is discussed. A reduction approach is introduced for recognizing edge-solvable problems, together with an O(N^2) algorithm for graph reduction, where N is the number of nodes. An algorithm for the automatic generation of starvation-free edge-solvable solutions is presented. The solutions are proved to be very efficient. For general problems, there are two ways to generate efficient solutions. One associates a semaphore with every node, the other with every edge. They are both better than the standard monitor—like solutions. Besides strong semaphores, solutions using weak semaphores, weaker semaphores and generalized semaphores are also considered. Basic properties of semaphore solutions are also discussed. Tools describing the dynamic behavior of parallel systems, as well as performance criteria for evaluating semaphore solutions are elaborated.
Date: August 1988
Creator: Yue, Kwok B. (Kwok Bun)

Inheritance Problems in Object-Oriented Database

Description: This research is concerned with inheritance as used in object-oriented database. More specifically, partial bi-directional inheritance among classes is examined. In partial inheritance, a class can inherit a proper subset of instance variables from another class. Two subclasses of the same superclass do not need to inherit the same proper subset of instance variables from their superclass. Bi-directional partial inheritance allows a class to inherit instance variables from its subclass. The prototype of an object-oriented database that supports both full and partial bi-directional inheritance among classes was developed on top of an existing relational database management system. The prototype was tested with two database applications. One database application needs full and partial inheritance. The second database application required bi-directional inheritance. The result of this testing suggests both advantages and disadvantages of partial bi-directional inheritance. Future areas of research are also suggested.
Date: May 1989
Creator: Auepanwiriyakul, Raweewan

A C Navigational System

Description: The C Navigational System (CNS) is a proposed programming environment for the C programming language. The introduction covers the major influences of programming environments and the components of a programming environment. The system is designed to support the design, coding and maintenance phases of software development. CNS provides multiple views to both the source and documentation for a programming project. User-defined and system-defined links allow the source and documentation to be hierarchically searched. CNS also creates a history list and function interface for each function in a module. The final chapter compares CNS and several other programming environments (Microscope, Rn, Cedar, PECAN, and Marvel).
Date: May 1989
Creator: Hammerquist, James D. (James Daniel)

Computer Graphics Primitives and the Scan-Line Algorithm

Description: This paper presents the scan-line algorithm which has been implemented on the Lisp Machine. The scan-line algorithm resides beneath a library of primitive software routines which draw more fundamental objects: lines, triangles and rectangles. This routine, implemented in microcode, applies the A(BC)*D approach to word boundary alignments in order to create an extremely fast, efficient, and general purpose drawing primitive. The scan-line algorithm improves on previous methodologies by limiting the number of CPU intensive instructions and by minimizing the number of words referenced. This paper will describe how to draw scan-lines and the constraints imposed upon the scan-line algorithm by the Lisp Machine's hardware and software.
Date: December 1988
Creator: Myjak, Michael D. (Michael David)

The Object-Oriented Database Editor

Description: Because of an interest in object-oriented database systems, designers have created systems to store and manipulate specific sets of abstract data types that belong to the real world environment they represent. Unfortunately, the advantage of these systems is also a disadvantage since no single object-oriented database system can be used for all applications. This paper describes an object-oriented database management system called the Object-oriented Database Editor (ODE) which overcomes this disadvantage by allowing designers to create and execute an object-oriented database that represents any type of environment and then to store it and simulate that environment. As conditions within the environment change, the designer can use ODE to alter that environment without loss of data. ODE provides a flexible environment for the user; it is efficient; and it can run on a personal computer.
Date: December 1989
Creator: Coats, Sidney M. (Sidney Mark)

Linear Unification

Description: Efficient unification is considered within the context of logic programming. Unification is explained in terms of equivalence classes made up of terms, where there is a constraint that no equivalence class may contain more than one function term. It is demonstrated that several well-known "efficient" but nonlinear unification algorithms continually maintain the said constraint as a consequence of their choice of data structure for representing equivalence classes. The linearity of the Paterson-Wegman unification algorithm is shown largely to be a consequence of its use of unbounded lists of pointers for representing equivalences between terms, which allows it to avoid the nonlinearity of "union-find".
Date: December 1989
Creator: Wilbanks, John W. (John Winston)

Defensive Programming

Description: This research explores the concepts of defensive programming as currently defined in the literature. Then these concepts are extended and more explicitly defined. The relationship between defensive programming, as presented in this research, and current programming practices is discussed and several benefits are observed. Defensive programming appears to benefit the entire software life cycle. Four identifiable phases of the software development process are defined, and the relationship between these four phases and defensive programming is shown. In this research, defensive programming is defined as writing programs in such a way that during execution the program itself produces communication allowing the programmer and the user to observe its dynamic states accurately and critically. To accomplish this end, the use of defensive programming snap shots is presented as a software development tool.
Date: May 1980
Creator: Bailey, L. Mark

Information Storage and Retrieval Systems

Description: This thesis describes the implementation of a general purpose personal information storage and retrieval system. Chapter one contains an introduction to information storage and retrieval. Chapter two contains a description of the features a useful personal information retrieval system should contain. This description forms the basis for the implementation of the personal information storage and retrieval system described in chapter three. The system is implemented in UCSD Pascal on an Apple II microcomputer.
Date: May 1983
Creator: Creech, Teresa Adams