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Job Satisfaction of Secondary School Principals in the Rivers State of Nigeria

Description: This study addresses these questions: (1) What is the relationship between secondary school principals' job satisfaction and their ages, educational level, salary, and years of experience on the job, size of school, and location of school? and (2) What is the relationship between two instruments that measure job satisfaction--The Job Descriptive Index (JDI) and The Job in General (JIG).
Date: May 1986
Creator: Maduagwu, Samuel Nwankwo

The Development of a Model Plan for Evaluating Higher Education Planning in Nigeria

Description: The purpose of this study was to develop a standard instrument for determining the basic elements to be contained in a state of national long-range plan for higher education and to utilize that instrument in evaluating the current planning efforts in Nigeria. In order to fulfill the purpose of the study, answers were sought to seven research questions and procedures were worked out for ten experts in higher-education planning to validate criteria statements about the major elements of a model long-range plan for higher education in a political unit. The findings of this study appear to warrant the conclusions that (1) state or national plans for higher education contain similar major elements and have certain underlying assumptions, (2) long-range planning documents can be evaluated using established criteria, (3) Nigerian planning for higher education has been somewhat systematic but lacks thoroughness, and (4) Nigerian planning for higher education can be strengthened and improved if future planning activities more closely meet established criteria of the model used in this study. Recommendations are offered which could strengthen the existing plan and aid future planning exercises in Nigeria.
Date: May 1980
Creator: Ibiok, Joseph F. D.

An Examination of Higher Education in the Process of Economic Development and Social Change in Nigeria

Description: The problem of this study was to describe higher education in relation to economic development and social change in Nigeria. The purposes of this study were (1) to identify the needs for economic development and social change in Nigeria; (2) to relate higher education goals to the identified needs; (3) to determine the perceptions of the participating groups of students, faculty members, academic administrators, and government officials about what priority of importance is being placed and should be placed on higher education goals to achieve the national needs; (4) to formulate recommendations for the future development of higher education in relation to economic development and social change in Nigeria.
Date: May 1983
Creator: Enin-Okut, Akanuboh A.

Geography of Tuberculosis in the Greater Accra Region of Ghana

Description: In Ghana, spatial patterns of TB vary for different regions and variations may occur within the same region. This study examines TB distribution in the Greater Accra Region of Ghana using Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Behavioral, cultural and economic variables associated with TB morbidity are examined. From January 1998 to June 1999, data obtained from the Ghana Ministry of Health revealed that, men had a higher TB rate than women, TB was common among the age groups 20-29 and 30-39, and the average TB rate of 67.7 per 100, 000 population in the Greater Accra Region was higher than the national average (58.6 per 100,000 population). Using the human ecology model, this study attempts to explain the spatial distribution of the disease.
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Date: May 2001
Creator: Donkor, Kweku

A Historical Review of Secondary Education in Western Nigeria: 1842-1976

Description: The purposes of this study are to describe the past and the present system of secondary education in Western Nigeria; to examine the goals, achievements, and failures with special consideration for three distinct periods: (1) prior to the arrival of the British people in Western Nigeria, (2) between 1842 and 1960, and (3) between 1960 and 1976; to formulate generalizations about secondary schools, and to offer suggestions for the improvement of the secondary educational system in Western Nigeria. One recommendation that the study makes calls for mass secondary education, not education of the elite only. The recommendations call for programs that would lead to industrial and technological progress.
Date: May 1977
Creator: Ajala, Oyewole Olayioye

Faculty Research Productivity at Addis Ababa University

Description: This study explores the research productivity of Addis Ababa University (AAU) faculty. AAU was established in 1950 and is the oldest modern higher educational institution in Ethiopia. Recently AAU took steps to transform itself to become a pre-eminent African research university. One of the characteristics of a research university is the focus on the amount of research conducted by the institution's faculty. Academic institutions measure research productivity primarily based on published work. The purpose of this study was to analyze the research productivity of AAU faculty, and to examine the differential predictive effects of individual and environmental variables on faculty research productivity. This quantitative study used a theoretical framework and instrument, Faculty at Work. Four hundred questionnaires were distributed to Addis AAU faculty in person and 298 questionnaires were returned resulting in a 74.5% response rate. After exclusion of 12 cases with missing information, 286 cases (71.5% response rate) were analyzed. Most of the respondents were men (M = 92.1%, F = 7.9%). The average age of AAU faculty was 44. A hierarchical multiple regression was used to examine the ability of six sets of independent variables (sociodemographic, career, self-knowledge, social knowledge, behavior, and environmental response) to predict research productivity (publication output). Results indicated that there are productive researchers at AAU, and the theoretical framework explained 67.6% of the variance in publication output.
Date: May 2011
Creator: Stafford, Mehary T.

Post-Colonial Economic Development of the United Republic of Tanzania

Description: Tanzania achieved full self-government on May 1st, 1961 and adopted its constitution on December 9th, 1962. It is a member of the British Commonwealth, the Organization of African Unity and the United Nations. Tanzania is a developing country predominantly dependent upon agriculture. Tanzania's rate of economic development, relative to other African countries, is mid-way between the wealthiest and the poorest. The economic development of Tanzania is analyzed in detail between the years from 1961 to 197. The dual policy of development adopted by the Tanzanian government called for unbalanced growth in both agriculture and industry. To a certain extent that policy was proven successful.
Date: May 1980
Creator: Ashagre, Tadesse

Nigerian Politics: A Case Study of Military Coups

Description: This study surveys the issue of military coups in Nigerian politics. An attempt is made to explain the causes of coups d'etat. To this end, Thompson's thesis of military grievances has been rigorously employed to explain the occurrences of military coups in Nigeria. The Thompson thesis asserts that coups occur because the military is aggrieved. A study of the opinions of expert observers familiar with Nigerian politics confirmed that four out of the six military coups occurred due to problems emanating from the Nigerian military establishment. Although military grievances such as its political positions, resource bases, ethnicity, and factions within the military caused most coups, there is sufficient evidence that societal factors like economic crises, election decisions, and the need for reforms also encouraged the military to overthrow governments in Nigeria.
Date: May 1986
Creator: Jombo, Augustin B. (Augustin Bolsover)

Reproductive Decision Making Among Zambian Couples: Agreement and Conflict

Description: Fertility studies have often focused on the behavioral and attitudinal attributes of women with regard to fertility. Until recently, the role of men in fertility studies have often been ignored within much of the literature concerning fertility decisions. The focus of this study will examine if differences exist between husbands and wives with regard to the following four aspects of fertility decisions: spacing of children, methods of family planning, sex preference, and desired family size. The data were collected from 125 households in Kitwe, Zambia. Identical questionnaires were submitted to the husbands and wives during separate interviews. Content analysis was used to analyze the data. Overall, no significant differences exist among husbands and wives with regard to the four aspects of fertility decisions being researched.
Date: May 1998
Creator: Wilson, Judy Fralick

Competency Needs of Administrators in Teacher Training Colleges in Kenya As Perceived By Administrators and Faculty

Description: The problem of this study was the needed administrative competencies of administrators in teacher training colleges in Kenya as perceived by administrators and faculty. A questionnaire (Inventory of Administrative Competencies) was mailed to principals, vice-principals, and four faculty members selected at random from sixteen teacher training colleges in Kenya. Ninety-six questionnaires were returned, yielding a return rate of 100 percent. Responses were analyzed using t-tests and one-way analyses of variance utilizing the F-test of the statistical test. A series of post hoc comparisons was made using Duncan's New Multiple Range Test to locate significant differences. Based on the analysis of data, it was concluded that both administrators and faculty considered the desired status of the competency very high. The administrators were performing below the desired status. Size of college was the major factor for the differences in perceptions of the respondents. Years of experience and educational background had little or no effect on the respondents' responses to the questionnaire. The following recommendations were made: A future study should investigate the perceived desired status and present performance ratings assigned to a validated set of competency statements of those levels of administrative activities not included in this study. Such a study would involve school inspectors, provincial education officers, deans of students, and heads of departments. A study should be made to investigate the current methods of evaluating administrative competence in teacher training colleges in Kenya. The results of this study should be analyzed by the Ministry of Education teacher college program developers responsible for conducting administrative workshops or in—service training in Kenya. This study could provide developers with additional information for improving the adequacy and relevance of both pre—service and in-service programs for practicing administrators.
Date: May 1989
Creator: Konditi, Jane A. O. (Jane Akinyi Osamba)

Dependence of the Egyptian Historic Transition on the Banking System

Description: The problem with which this paper is concerned is that of examining the role that the Egyptian Banking System had to assume during the transition period, 1952 - 1964. This paper is divided in four parts; the first part is an introduction and it is composed of Chapter I. Part two is a brief survey of the economic and monetary developments in Egypt during this transition period and it is composed of Chapters II and III. Part three examines the reconstruction of the banking system and it is composed of Chapters IV and V. Part four presents a conclusion and some implications for other developing countries. The Egyptian experience's lack of success was due to non-realistic and uncoordinated planning.
Date: May 1977
Creator: Nijim, Monther M.

The Shifting Borders of Egypt

Description: The formation of state borders is often told through the history of war and diplomacy. What is neglected is the tale of how borders of seemingly peaceful and long-extant places were set. In drawing Egypt’s borders, nineteenth-century cartographers were drawing upon a well of knowledge that stretched back into antiquity. Relying on the works of Greco-Roman writers and the Bible itself, cartographers and explorers used the authority of these works to make sense of unfamiliar lands, regardless of any current circumstances. The border with Palestine was determined through the usage of the Old Testament, while classical scholars like Herodotus and Ptolemy set the southern border at the Cataracts. The ancient cartography of Rome was overlaid upon the Egypt of Muhammad Ali. Given the increasing importance Egypt had to the burgeoning British Empire of the nineteenth century, how did this mesh with the influences informing cartographical representations of Egypt? This study argues that the imagined spaces created by Western cartographers informed the trajectory of Britain’s eventual conquest of Egypt. While receding as geopolitical concerns took hold, the classical and biblical influences were nonetheless part of a larger trend of Orientalism that colored the way Westerners interacted with and treated the people of Egypt and the East. By examining the maps and the terminology employed by nineteenth century scholars on Egypt’s geography, a pattern emerges that highlights how much classical and biblical texts had on the Western imagination of Egypt as the modern terms eventually superseded them.
Date: May 2015
Creator: Chavez, Miguel Angel

Work Motivation and Perceptions of Academic Organizational Climate: A Nigerian Study

Description: The problem with which this study is concerned is to determine the relationship between the motivations to work for Nigerian lecturers and their perceptions of their academic organizational climate. The related purposes of the study are to determine the motivations to work for Nigerian lecturers, their perceptions of the academic organizational climate in which they work, and the relationships that exist between motivations and type of organizational climate.
Date: May 1983
Creator: Aluko, Michael Afolabi

A Historical Review of the Influences of the Federal Government of Nigeria in National Higher Education 1954-1982

Description: The purpose of this study was to describe the influence of the federal government on higher education in Nigeria. This was done by taking a look at the historical influence of the Federal Ministry of Education, the State Ministry of Education of Nigeria, the influence of the universities and colleges on higher education, the influence of the Joint Admissions Matriculation Board (JAMB) in higher education, and the influence of the National Universities Commission on Higher Education in Universities and Colleges in Nigeria.
Date: May 1984
Creator: Ojiaka, Sam Ifeanyichukwu

Environmental Scanning Practices of Manufacturing Firms in Nigeria

Description: The purpose of this study was to examine scanning practices in a developing country by looking at the scanning behavior of executives of Nigerian manufacturing firms. Specifically, this study examined the decision maker's perception of environmental uncertainty (PEU), the frequency and degree of interest with which decision makers scan each sector of the environment, the frequency of use of various sources of information, the number of organizational adjustments made in response to actions of environmental groups, and the obstacles encountered in collecting information from the environment.
Date: May 1992
Creator: Sawyerr, Olukemi Olaitan

Our Planet, May 2010

Description: Magazine of the United Nations Environment Programme discussing worldwide environmental policies and other concerns. This issue is devoted to the economic importance of biodiversity and how protecting or restoring habitats can significantly reduce the costs in a variety of industries and infrastructures.
Date: May 2010
Creator: United Nations Environment Programme

Nigerian Military Government and Press Freedom, 1966-79

Description: The problem of this thesis is to examine the military-press relationship in Nigeria from 1966 to 1979 and to determine whether activities of the military government contributed to violation of press freedom by prior restraint, postpublication censorship and penalization. Newspaper and magazine articles related to this study were analyzed. Interviews with some journalists and military personnel were also conducted. Materials collected show that the military violated some aspects of press freedom, but in most cases, however, journalists were free to criticize government activities. The judiciary prevented the military from arbitrarily using its power against the press. The findings show that although the military occasionally attempted suppressing the press, there are few instances that prove that journalists were denied press freedom.
Date: May 1984
Creator: Agboaye, Ehikioya

Common Ground: Solutions for reducing the human, economic and conservation costs of human wildlife conflict

Description: This report deals with the conflicts between wildlife and human development. Three cases studies are included, in Namibia, Nepal and Indonesia, respectively. Each location has different problems and contexts, but in all three countries, human lives and economic livelihoods are at stake, as well as the loss of habitat of threatened species. The authors advocate a species conservation approach based on land use planning integrated with human needs in order continue sustainable development.
Date: May 2008
Creator: World Wildlife Fund

An Analysis of the Need for Human Resource Development in Nigeria

Description: The present study was concerned with seeking the opinions of Nigerian employers, Nigerians studying in the United States, and those studying in Nigeria concerning the need for human resource development in Nigeria. Data were collected through questionnaires mailed to selected Nigerian employers and to Nigerian students studying at various United States college campuses and at Nigerian university campuses. Problems of unemployment and critical shortages of skilled manpower continue to be rampant in Nigeria. The present investigation, through an analysis of questionnaire responses, seems to support the impression that little is really being done by Nigerian organization to upgrade and strengthen personnel talent in a planned and organized way. Most companies have no central long-range goal to guide their manpower development efforts. Much more time, effort, and expense are likely being devoted to the introduction of new operating systems or pieces of equipment than to the improvement of people.
Date: May 1975
Creator: Adewuyi, Joseph Ajibade

The Problems of the Economic Development of Uganda

Description: Given the problems of economic development, the purpose of this thesis is to examine, analyze, and reevaluate the impact of human, social, economic, and political problems on the economic development of Uganda. The strategy adopted in the study of the problems involved in the economic development of Uganda is historical. In short, the study examines past, recent, and present literature on economic development of Uganda.
Date: May 1973
Creator: Ebangit, Zerubbabel Ojimam

The Impact of Student-Faculty Informal Interpersonal Relationships on Intellectual and Personal Development in the University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria

Description: This study was conducted to determine the impact of student-faculty informal interpersonal relationships on the intellectual development and personal achievement of students attending the University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria. Specifically, the work of Pascarella and Terenzini was generalized with respect to the positive influence of student-faculty interactions on academic outcomes. Additionally, the work of Pascarella and Terenzini was extended with a sample of students at the University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria. Eight hundred subjects were selected for the study; 621 subjects responded. One survey instrument was used. Frequencies and multiple regression analyses were used. A series of studies on student-faculty interaction has shown a significant relationship between student-faculty informal contact and student outcomes. A large number of studies have also indicated that student outcomes are not independent of students' background. Therefore, pre-enrollment characteristics were controlled for this study.
Date: May 1994
Creator: Aluko, Stella Ola

The Harambee Movement and its Effects on Kenya's Economic Development

Description: This paper examines the Harambee Movement and how it affected Kenya's economic development. Before 1963 Kenya was a British colony and economic development favored the colonial government. At Independence the new government tried to restructure the economy for the Kenyan people. Recognizing the lack of adequate capital and a rural development program, the movement became a means by which people could provide services for themselves. These services included schools, technical training, water supply and health facilities. Sources of data were books, articles, government publications and papers published by the Institute of Development Studies, Nairobi University. The Harambee Movement flourished in the provision of educational opportunities, clean water supply and health facilities. Problems included planning, coordinating and duplication of services.
Date: May 1984
Creator: Moga, Mary M.

Population Growth and Socioeconomic Development in Nigeria 1960 - 1984

Description: This study is directed toward the relationship between population growth and socioeconomic development in Nigeria for the period 1960-1984. A controlled population growth would positively affect every segment of the economic and social environment. With hunger and starvation, disease, poverty and illiteracy plaguing large portions of the world, Nigeria's limited resources would best be utilized if shared among a smaller population, Nigeria, like other developing African countries, does not have an official population control policy. The diversity in the Nigerian culture, the controversial nature of the subject of population control, and possibly, implementation difficulties, account for the absence of a population control policy in Nigeria. This study offers in its concluding section some policy recommendations on how to tackle Nigeria's population problem.
Date: May 1987
Creator: Asongwe, Michael N. (Michael Nde)