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Adults' Reports of the Role of Psychotherapy in Integrating Their Childhood Near-Death Experiences: A Preliminary Investigation

Description: Abstract: The Purpose of the exploratory research was to learn if adults who had childhood near-death experiences (NDEs) sometime between pre-birth to age 17 years had psychotherapy and if they believed it helped them achieve psychological integration of their NDEs. Participants completed three instruments: the NDE Scale (Greyson, 1990), the author-developed Childhood NDE and Psychotherapy Questionnaire, and the three Subjective and Psychological Well-Being Scales (Diener & Biswas-Diener, 2008). Of 29 respondents, 23 met the NDE Scale criteria for an NDE. Results for the 15 (67%) who had engaged in psychological integration of NDE's and more positive emotional feelings (r = .77, p < .01) and fewer negative emotions (r = -.84, p < .01). The correlation between psychological integration of NDE and success with a small effect (r = .16, p > .10). The psychotherapy factors identified by participants as successful i helping them process and integrate their NDE's included having a therapist who accepted the NDE as real and validated the experience and who helped the NDEr express thoughts and feelings about, explore the meaning of, and resolve any guilt around the NDE. Results supported the idea that psychological integration of NDEs is related to subjective and psychological wellbeing, and the provided clues about features of psychotherapy that might promote NDE integration. Limitations of the study, implications of results for psychotherapeutic interventions, and suggestions for future research are discussed.
Date: Spring 2013
Creator: Moores, Jenny R. & Ammen, Sue

After-math: Counting the Aftereffects of Potentially Spiritually Transformative Experiences

Description: Abstract: This article provides a summary of current literature regarding the nature of spiritual development, types of potentially spiritually transformative experiences (pSTEs), and both short- and long-term aftereffects of pSTEs— biological, psychological, spiritual, and social. The author concludes that in the aftermath of pSTEs, experiencers, their intimates and associates, and their healthcare providers should be prepared to experience integration that can be manageable or be deeply challenging and that can be relatively brief or can last for years.
Date: Winter 2012
Creator: Holden, Janice Miner

Aquiline Books at UNT: A Progress Report

Description: Presentation for the 2017 Texas Conference on Institutional Repositories. In June 2015, the UNT Libraries launched a for-fee service for publishing works of scholarship from authors affiliated with the university. While authors can choose from a menu of editing and design options, all publications are made free to read online through the institutional repository. In this presentation, we reflect on our choices in designing the publishing service—such as not organizing peer review, delivering publications through the repository, requiring free public access but not Creative Commons licenses—and on what authors have chosen from the menu of options over the past two years.
Date: June 2, 2017
Creator: Hawkins, Kevin S.

Art book indexes reviewed

Description: Article discussing index characteristics considered important by reviewers of art books.
Date: September 2014
Creator: Sassen, Catherine

Assessment of Cataloging Services in an Academic Library

Description: This article contains survey data on cataloging services as assessed by personnel in the Public Services Division and the Catalog and Metadata Services Department.
Date: December 30, 2015
Creator: Sassen, Catherine; Loafman, Kathryn & Welch, Rebecca

Biography indexes reviewed

Description: Article discussing research on biography reviews and indexes.
Date: September 2012
Creator: Sassen, Catherine

Brief Report: A Near-Death Experience with Veridical Perception Described by a Famous Heart Surgeon and Confirmed by his Assistant Surgeon

Description: Abstract: The professional near-death literature contains cases in which near-death experiencers reported that during their experiences (NDEs), they perceived phenomena in the material world that, based on the condition and position of their physical bodies, they should not have been able to perceive, and yet these perceptions were subsequently verified as accurate. Only a few of these cases of apparently non-physical veridical perception during NDEs have been carefully researched. In this article, we report a case described originally by cardiac surgeon Lloyd Rudy in a YouTube Internet video. We describe pour process of following up exhaustively on all avenues of investigation available to us and our conclusion that this case is among the most evidential in which perceptions during an NDE were confirmed as completely accurate by objective observers.
Date: Spring 2013
Creator: Rivas, Titus & Smit, Rudolf H.

Brief Report: Induced After-Death Communication: An Update

Description: Abstract: Seventy-one clients (50 females, 21 males) who were treated with Induced After-Death Communication (IADC) therapy completed the author-developed Grief Symptom Questionnaire (GSQ) before and after the two-session treatment protocol and at six months post-treatment. Factor analyses revealed three factors - Depression, Anger, and Positive Coping - underlying nine GSQ items. Seventy-nine percent of the sample reported experiencing an IADC during treatment - an experience of communication with a deceased loved one they were grieving. In comparison with pre-treatment, at post-treatment participants reported statistically significant improvements in their grief symptoms, an increase in belief in an afterlife, an improvement in Positive Coping, and decreased Anger and Depression. Implications of the findings and methodological limitations are discussed.
Date: Summer 2013
Creator: Hannah, Mo Therese; Botkin, Allan L.; Marrone, Joseph G. & Streit-Horn, Jenny

Brief Report: Near-Death Experiences among a Sample of Iranian Muslims

Description: Abstract: Muslim near-death experiences (NDEs) have been rarely reported by comparison to the incident of NDEs reported in other groups. Recently, after Kreps (2009) found no NDEs in a sample from Pakistan and Kashmir, he concluded Muslim NDEs may even be nonexistent. However, in Arak City, Iran, we easily identified 19 Iranian Muslims who reported having experienced an NDE. Thirty participants claiming to have memories from a period of unconsciousness associated with a close brush with death completed a Persian translation of Greyson's (1983) NDE Scale as well as background and semi-structured questions. Of these, 19 (63%) scored 7 or higher on the NDE Scale, Greyson's criterion for a valid NDE. The presumed NDErs were 10 female and 9 male; aged 16 to 65 years old with a mean age of 33; ranging in education from no high school diploma (5%), to high school diploma (37%), to bachelor's degree (58%); reporting NDE circumstances of accident (58%), attempted suicide (16%), illness (11%), natural disaster (11%), and emotional trauma (5%); and reporting time since NDE ranging from less than one to 20 years with a mean of 8 years. Although low reliability precluded further statistical analysis of the data or comparison of them to results of previous Western studies, our informal assessment was that both the contents and aftereffects of the Muslim NDEs were quite similar to those of Westerners. We concluded that NDEs are not particularly rare in Muslim groups and that their similarity to Western NDEs suggests they may be a cross-culturally universal and transpersonal phenomenon.
Date: Autumn 2010
Creator: Fracasso, Cheryl; Aleyasin, Seyed Ali; Friedman, Harris & Young, M. Scott

Brief Report: Phenomenology of Near-Death Experiences: An Analysis of a Maori Case Study

Description: Abstract: Near-death experiences (NDEs) have been recorded in the oral and written histories of virtually every culture since antiquity. Based on some of theses accounts, attempts have been made to investigate whether the phenomenology of the NDE is cross-culturally variable or similar. The present article contributes to this literature by analyzing the only known historical account of an NDE reported by a Maori individual. Although this account has been previously analyzed for its association with features typically reported in Western NDE accounts, it has been analyzed for its conformity to prevailing Maori beliefs about the afterlife. The analysis of this single case study suggests the NDE was influenced by cultural beliefs, which supports two converging viewpoint: that NDE phenomenology is universal but expressed in culturally-relative ways and that NDE phenomenology is culture-bound.
Date: Winter 2013
Creator: Tassell-Matamua, Natasha

Brief Report: Psychologists' Knowledge of and Attitudes about Near-Death Experiences: Changes over Time and Relationship to Transpersonl Self-Concept

Description: Abstract: We conducted a comparison and extension of Walker and Russell's (1989) study of psychologists' knowledge of and attitudes about near-death experiences (NDEs). We used their Near-Death Phenomena Knowledge and Attitudes Questionnaire (NDPKAQ), consisting of one knowledge scale and two attitude scales, to explore possible changes over time. We also used the Self-Expansiveness Level Form -- Transpersonal Scale (SELF-TS; Friedman, 1983) to explore the relationship of transpersonal self-concept with knowledge of and attitudes about NDEs. We randomly surveyed 84 psychologists listed in the Washington state National Register and obtained 18 completed responses (61% male, 39% female; mean age 60 years; ethnicity unknown). The comparison of our NDPKAQ data with Walker and Russell's Illinois psychologists' data suggests psychologists' knowledge and attitudes about NDEs have remained unchanged over the pas two decades (p > .05). Two of the three NDPKAQ scale scores correlated significantly with the SELF-TS scores (p = .03, .05), suggesting a positive relationship between transpersonal self-concept and knowledge of and attitudes towards NDEs. We discuss limitations of our results and implications of our findings for professional education and training on NDEs.
Date: Autumn 2010
Creator: Fracasso, Cheryl; Friedman, Harris & Young, M. Scott

Brief Report: Psychotherapeutic Outcomes Reported by Therapists Trained in Induced After-Death Communication

Description: Abstract: Induced after-death communication (IADC) is a new psychotherapeutic procedure based on a variation of eye-movement desensitization and re-processing (EMDR). Psychologist Allan Botkin discovered it accidentally in 1995 while he was conducting therapy with combat veterans suffering from grief and post-traumatic stress disorder. During the course of the IADC treatment, Botkin's patients reported experiencing what they believed to be communications from a deceased person. The psychological healing associated with these experiences seemed remarkable. The following report presents the results of a survey Botkin conducted with other therapists he personally trained to conduct IADC. The results indicate that other IADC therapists achieved successful results nearly identical to those of Botkin and that the results were consistent across trained therapists.
Date: Summer 2013
Creator: Botkin, Allan L. & Hannah, Mo Therese

The Challenges of Traveling a Psychospiritual Path in Today's Postmodern Western World

Description: Abstract: Although the category "Religious or Spiritual Problem" (Code V62.89) was incorporated into the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for mental health professional in 1994, it has taken until 2012 for a conference or training to take place designed to help therapists and social workers understand how best to address such issues. In this article I describe my personal experience and my professional experience as a psychotherapist with religious and spiritual phenomena. I offer my view of what it means to be spiritual, including the role of worldviews and my conceptualization of a three-stage path of spiritual development.
Date: Winter 2012
Creator: Miller, Judith D.