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Brief Report: Induced After-Death Communication: An Update

Description: Abstract: Seventy-one clients (50 females, 21 males) who were treated with Induced After-Death Communication (IADC) therapy completed the author-developed Grief Symptom Questionnaire (GSQ) before and after the two-session treatment protocol and at six months post-treatment. Factor analyses revealed three factors - Depression, Anger, and Positive Coping - underlying nine GSQ items. Seventy-nine percent of the sample reported experiencing an IADC during treatment - an experience of communication with a deceased loved one they were grieving. In comparison with pre-treatment, at post-treatment participants reported statistically significant improvements in their grief symptoms, an increase in belief in an afterlife, an improvement in Positive Coping, and decreased Anger and Depression. Implications of the findings and methodological limitations are discussed.
Date: Summer 2013
Creator: Hannah, Mo Therese; Botkin, Allan L.; Marrone, Joseph G. & Streit-Horn, Jenny

Brief Report: Psychotherapeutic Outcomes Reported by Therapists Trained in Induced After-Death Communication

Description: Abstract: Induced after-death communication (IADC) is a new psychotherapeutic procedure based on a variation of eye-movement desensitization and re-processing (EMDR). Psychologist Allan Botkin discovered it accidentally in 1995 while he was conducting therapy with combat veterans suffering from grief and post-traumatic stress disorder. During the course of the IADC treatment, Botkin's patients reported experiencing what they believed to be communications from a deceased person. The psychological healing associated with these experiences seemed remarkable. The following report presents the results of a survey Botkin conducted with other therapists he personally trained to conduct IADC. The results indicate that other IADC therapists achieved successful results nearly identical to those of Botkin and that the results were consistent across trained therapists.
Date: Summer 2013
Creator: Botkin, Allan L. & Hannah, Mo Therese

The Field of Near-Death Studies Through 2011: An Updated Analysis of the Scholarly Periodical Literature

Description: Abstract: Previously in this Journal, Holden and Christian (2005) profiled patterns in the field of near-death studies through an analysis of the scholarly publications from Near-Death Experiences: Index to the Periodical Literature through 2001. In this article, we provide an updated analysis of a similar type through 2011. The body of literature on which we based this analysis included 892 scholarly articles by 629 authors spanning more than a century. We report on patterns related to publication dates and venues, experts and their most cited articles, and most and least published topics in the field - both with regard to current status and in comparison to 2001. We discuss limitations of our analysis and implications of it for the future of scholarship in the field of near-death studies.
Date: Summer 2013
Creator: Loseu, Saharnaz; Holden, Janice Miner; Kinsey, Lee & Christian, Rozan

On the Term "Peak in Darien" Experience

Description: Abstract: In this article, I propose to replace the term a "Peak in Darien" experience, which seems to be recently gaining ground, with some other term. Two reasons for this proposal are: (a) the term, taken from John Keats's well-known poem "On First Looking into Chapman's Homer," is based on a series of misunderstanding over the years, and (b) using an expression requiring idiosyncratic cultural knowledge irrelevant to the topic may not be the best approach in scientific writing that will be widely read in both Western and non-Western cultures. As a possible substitute, I propose the terms "Encounter with Known Decedent Not Known to Have Died" (EKD) and "Encounter with Unknown Decedent (EUD)" to refer to the relevant cases.
Date: Summer 2013
Creator: Ohkado, Masayuki