UNT Libraries - 4 Matching Results

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Physical, Chemical and Catalytic Properties of the Isozymes of Bovine Glucose Phosphate Isomerase

Description: Glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI) occurs in different bovine tissues as multiple, catalytically active isozymes which can be resolved by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing. GPI from bovine heart was purified to homogeneity and each of the isozymes was resolved. Four of the five isozymes were characterized with regard to their physical, chemical and catalytic properties in order to establish their possible physiological significance and to ascertain their molecular basis. The isozymes exhibited identical native (118 Kd) and subunit (59 Kd) molecular weights but had different apparent pi values of 7.2, 7.0, 6.8 and 6.6. Structural analyses showed that the amino terminus was blocked and the carboxyl terminal sequence was -Glu-Ala-Ser-Gly for all four isozymes. The most basic isozyme was more stable than the more acidic isozymes (lower pi values) at pH extremes, at high ionic strength, in the presence of denaturants or upon exposure to proteases. Kinetic constants, such as turnover number, Km and Ki values, were identical for all isozymes. Identical amino acid composition and peptide mapping by chemical cleavage at methionine and cysteine residues of the isozymes suggest a postsynthetic modification rather then a genetic origin for the in vivo isozymes. When the most basic isozyme was incubated in vitro under mild alkaline conditions, there was a spontaneous generation of the more acidic isozymes with electrophoretic properties identical to those found in vivo. The simultaneous release in ammonia along with the spontaneous shift to more acidic isozymes and changes in the specific cleavage of the Asn-Gly bonds by hydroxylamine of the acidic isozyme indicates deamidation as the probable molecular basis. In summary the isozymes appear to be the result of spontaneous, postsynthetic modifications involving the addition of an equal number of negative charges and are consistent with the deamidation process.
Date: August 1987
Creator: Cini, John Kenneth

Purification, Characterization and Receptor Binding of Human Colony-Stimulating Factor-1

Description: Human colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) was purified from the serum-free conditioned medium of a human pancreatic carcinoma cell line. The four-step procedure included chromatography on DEAE Sepharose, Con A Sepharose and HPLC on phenyl column and reverse-phase C-3 column. The purity of human CSF-1 was demonstrated by sodium dodecyl sulfatepolyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS—PAGE) as a single diffuse band with a molecular weight (Mr) of 42,000-50,000 and was further confirmed by a single amino-terminal amino acid residue of glutamate. Under reducing conditions, purified CSF-1 appeared on SDS-PAGE as a single protein band with a Mr of 21,000-25,000 and concurrently lost its biological activity, indicating that human CSF-1 consists of two similar subunits and that the intact quaternary structure is essential for biological activity. When treated with neuraminidase and endo-8~D~N—acetylglucosaminidase D, the Mr of CSF-1 was reduced to 36,000-40,000 and to a Mr of 18,000-20,000 in the presence of mercaptoethanol.
Date: May 1987
Creator: Shieh, Jae-Hung

Studies of Enzyme Mechanism Using Isotopic Probes

Description: The isotope partitioning studies of the Ascaris suum NAD-malic enzyme reaction were examined with five transitory complexes including E:NAD, E:NAD:Mg, E:malate, E:Mg:malate, and E:NAD:malate. Three productive complexes, E:NAD, E:NAD:Mg, and E:Mg:malate, were obtained, suggesting a steady-state random mechanism. Data for trapping with E:14C-NAD indicate a rapid equilibrium addition of Mg2+ prior to the addition of malate. Trapping with 14C-malate could only be obtained from the E:Mg2+:14C-malate complex, while no trapping from E:14C-malate was obtained under feasible experimental conditions. Most likely, E:malate is non-productive, as has been suggested from the kinetic analysis. The experiment with E:NAD:malate could not be carried out due to the turnover of trace amounts of malate dehydrogenase in the pulse solution. The equations for the isotope partitioning studies varying two substrates in the chase solution in an ordered terreactant reaction were derived, allowing a determination of the relative rates of substrate dissociation to the catalytic reaction for each of the productive transitory complexes. NAD and malate are released from the central complex at an identical rate, equal to the catalytic rate.
Date: August 1987
Creator: Chen, Cheau-Yun

Studies on Hog Plasma Lecithin:cholesterol Acyltransferase: Isolation and Characterization of the Enzyme

Description: Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) was isolated from hog plasma and basic physicochemical properties and functionally important regions were investigated. Approximately one milligram of the enzyme was purified to apparent homogeneity with approximately a 20,000-fold increase in specific activity. In the plasma, hog LCAT was found to associate with high-density lipoproteins (HDL) probably through hydrophobic interactions with apolipoprotein A-I. HDL was the preferred lipoprotein substrate of the enzyme as its macromolecular substrate. The enzyme was found to contain 4 free sulfhydryl groups; at least one of these appeared to be essential for catalytic activity. The enzyme had a tendency to aggregate at high concentrations. More than half of the tryptophan and none of the tyrosine residues of the enzyme were shown to be exposed to the aqueous environment based on fluorescence and absorbance studies, respectively.
Date: May 1987
Creator: Park, Yong Bok