UNT Libraries - 4 Matching Results

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Nigerian Military Government and Problems of Agricultural Development

Description: This thesis attempts to analyze the military government's role in solving the country's agricultural problems. This analysis is essential because it was during the military's stay in power that Nigeria's potential as a selfsufficient and food exporting nation declined. Materials collected to analyze the above problems reveal that the military government's lack of adequate personnel to supervise and implement decisions taken on agriculture, unplanned schemes, and unresearched projects were partly responsible for the government's inability to solve Nigeria's agricultural problems. While it may be necessary to blame the military government for not being able to completely solve the country's numerous agricultural problems, the presence of global political and economic decisions seriously hampered measures taken by the military government.
Date: August 1985
Creator: Agboaye, Izilin Christiana

The Role of the Vice-Chancellor in the Nigerian University and the Factors Essential for Effective Administration as Perceived by Vice-Chancellors and Members of University Governing Councils in Nigeria

Description: The purposes of this study were to determine 1) the tasks that the Nigerian university vice-chancellor should perform personally, 2) the functions that the vice-chancellor should delegate to other university staff to achieve effective administration, 3) the factors that should be considered in the selection of a vice-chancellor, and 4) the criteria that should be considered in the evaluation of the vice-chancellor's job performance effectiveness. Chapter 1 includes a statement of the problem, purposes, research questions, background, significance of the study, definition of terms, limitations of the study, and basic assumptions. Chapter II is a review of related literature, and Chapter III presents information on the procedure followed in the collection and treatment of data. The analysis and evaluation of the findings are presented in Chapter IV; and the summary, findings, implications, and recommendations of the study are presented in Chapter V.
Date: December 1985
Creator: Ugwonali, Felix Chima

The Participation of Nigerian Licensed Engineers in Professional Development Activities Related to Management

Description: Many engineers perform managerial roles; however, their professional education in engineering usually does not include management education. Thus, this study examined the participation of the Nigerian licensed engineers in professional development activities in management. The study proposed (1) to determine if, in fact, Nigerian licensed engineers participate in management education and training; (2) to determine the management programs in which the engineers participated and whether participation was voluntary or required, or within Nigeria or overseas; (3) to test hypotheses dealing with these variables: age, management level, academic level, years of experience in a managerial role, and sector of employment; and (4) to identify the mean number of hours of participation. Also, the engineers were asked to judge the value of non-credit versus credit programs.
Date: December 1985
Creator: Saale, Nwike B. (Nwike Brother)

An Historical Inquiry Into the Development of Higher Education in Ghana 1948-1984: a Study of the Major Factors That Have Controlled and Inhibited the Development of the Universities of Ghana

Description: Universities in many industrialized countries including Japan, and Australia, have enabled those countries to achieve rapid economic and social advancement. However, this is untrue for the universities of Ghana, due to the country's ailing economy, its continued dependence on foreign manpower, aid, and material goods. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to illuminate the major factors and events that have controlled and inhibited the development of higher education in Ghana from 1948 to 1984. The method of acquiring data involved a computer and manual search for documents from 1) ERIC Database, 2) libraries , and 3) Embassy of Ghana, Washington, D.C. The findings include (1) Establishment of universities on the basis of the Asquith Doctrine; (2) Imitation of British universities' curriculum, constitution, standards and social functions; (3) Characterization of universities by elitism, lack of diversity and adaptation, autonomy, excellence and narrow specialism in their honor degree programs; (4) Emphasis on cognitive rather than psychomotor learning; (5) Matriculation of inadequately qualified secondary school science students; (6) Absence of a nationally formulated statement of manpower needs, goals, and effective long-term planning; (7) Financial exigencies; (8) Suppression, perversion and abuse of academic and intellectual freedom by the government and universities; (9) Inconsistent governmental policies due to abrupt changes in government by military coups.
Date: December 1985
Creator: Darko, Samuel F. (Samuel Fordjour)