UNT Libraries - 40 Matching Results

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Anti-Intellectualism in the Works of John Steinbeck

Description: There is evidence in Steinbeck's works of anti-intellectualism which is expressed by a somewhat maudlin handling of human emotions,and by a doggedly persistent attack on various intellectual types. This attitude is further revealed in Steinbeck's personal life by his abstention from any literary coteries or universities and his adamant refusal to discuss his life and works or offer his considerable talent to any institution of higher learning.
Date: August 1968
Creator: Dodge, Tommy R.

Cleopatra: A Comparative Critique

Description: Shakespeare's Cleopatra is a character of magnificent aspect, a puzzling paradox of magnetic intensity, an intensified diversity unmatched by any other Cleopatra in literary history. Although she was not his invention, Shakespeare made of her a living woman, believable in spite of her incredulous behavior.
Date: August 1968
Creator: Orcutt, Helen Jewell Smith

The Concept of the Ennobling Power of Love in Shakespeare's Love Tragedies

Description: This study proposes to demonstrate that the Platonic doctrine of the ennobling power of love is of paramount importance in a number of Shakespeare's plays. This study has been limited to the three love tragedies because in them the ennobling power of love is a major theme, affecting both the characters and the plot structure. The plays to be studied are Romeo and Juliet, Troilus and Cressida, and Antony and Cleopatra.
Date: January 1968
Creator: Fort, Barbara Jean

Conflict of the Heath

Description: The Return of the Native, and, to a lesser degree, Tess of the D'Urbervilles, served as the "darkling plain" upon which Hardy tried to pose and to solve his theories of the universe, its meanings and its duties toward man. The "darkling plain" in Hardy's works is represented by Egdon Heath and the country surrounding this heath.
Date: August 1968
Creator: Lusk, Donna Jane

Dostoevsky and the Irresistible Idea

Description: The primary goal of this paper is to investigate the phenomenon of a dream, a desire, or an idea transpiring in the thoughts of an individual, growing in importance to the individual, and finally becoming an idée fixe, or irresistible idea, which cannot be suppressed by the individual. The investigation will be concerned with the two of Dostoevsky's heroes who best exemplify the phenomenon.
Date: January 1968
Creator: Jones, Kenneth R.

Fact, Interpretation, and Theme in the Historical Novels of A. B. Guthrie, Jr.

Description: One can compare Guthrie's fiction with a sampling of the primary source material, to determine in general his degree of historical accuracy. Then one can compare Guthrie's interpretation with the interpretations of some widely read historiographers, to determine points of agreement or divergence. Finally, Guthrie's interpretation of history can be studied in relation to the themes he develops in his fiction.
Date: May 1968
Creator: Stephan, Peter M.

First-Person Narration in Edgar Allan Poe's Tales

Description: For the purpose of this study, Poe's tales were read and considered carefully in chronological order, the idea being to discover growth and development. Poe's literary career was relatively brief (1832-1849), and there are no dramatic or definite breaks or periods. Though his production shows growth in sophistication and artistry, it has been deemed more instructive to group Poets first-person narrators according to the part they play in the story, that is, (1) main actor or protagonist, (2) minor character, (3) observers and (4) combinations of the foregoing three. An attempt will be made to note both variation and pattern, and hence artistic skill, in Poe Is handling of each particular type of narrator.
Date: January 1968
Creator: Bost, Wallace Richard

Francis Thompson as a Myth-Maker

Description: The purpose of this paper is to establish that Francis Thompson, the English poet who lived from 1859 until 1907, is a myth-maker. In doing this, it will be necessary to define the term "myth-maker." The theme will then be developed by considering it in relation to the following topics: a brief resume of the events of his life having a direct bearing upon his mythic system, difficulties the student of his work must face, proof that he is a myth-maker of noteworthy significance, a consideration of the nature of his myth, a discussion of his most notable mythic values, and a special look at his mythic development of "The Hound of Heaven."
Date: May 1968
Creator: Carter, George F.

The Fugitive Kind in the Major Plays of Tennessee Williams

Description: What basic similarities are found in all the fugitives? First of all, they are fugitives in the sense that they are wanderers. While not necessarily running to or from some specific thing, the fugitives nonetheless are men who travel; they are men who only face their conflicts directly when they attempt to stop traveling either by changing themselves so that they will fit in (Val in Orpheus Descending and Chance), by changing their environment so that it will accept them (Val in Battle of Angels and Shannon), or by searching for something that is permanently lost (Kilroy).
Date: January 1968
Creator: Gunter, John O.

Homer's Asymmetrical Gods

Description: The objective of this paper is not to be right about Homer's understanding and use of the gods in some absolute sense, but to enter the spiraling Homeric conversation as a lesser voice--to be right, given the paper's presuppositions and limitations.
Date: August 1968
Creator: Thrash, William H.

The Image of Germany in the Novels of Günter Grass

Description: This thesis will attempt to scrutinize Günter Grass's message to his people and show his concern for the spiritual health of his country. Each of his three novels bears directly upon political, religious, and moral issues vital to Germany and to the world. The examination is based upon the assumption that Grass as an author is more concerned that Germans see themselves as they are and as they have been than he is concerned with the image of Germany which his novels present to the world. It is, paradoxically, this very special and sincere concern which gives his work universal appeal.
Date: January 1968
Creator: Boyar, Billy T.

Lamb's Self-Revelations as "Elia"

Description: The purpose of this thesis is to determine the nature of Charles Lamb as revealed in his Elia essays. To this end, these essays form the major portion of the text. The general procedure for ascertaining what these excerpts indicate is as follows: first, the characteristics of Charles Lamb are determined from a study of the Elia essays; second, these characteristics are considered in relation to information derived from biographies. Careful attention is given to significant discrepancies between the essays and other sources.
Date: January 1968
Creator: Rushing, Paula B.

Language Drift in English : Gender Loss and Semantic Change

Description: In parallel passages from Old and Middle English and in noun cognates from Modern English, Old English, and Modern German, the most discernible elements of language drift are gender loss and word meaning change, respectively. They can be observed, discussed, and calculated to show a definite progression toward the development of Modern English.
Date: August 1968
Creator: Parker, Mary A.

The Monomythic Pattern in Three Novels by D. H. Lawrence

Description: Sons and Lovers, The Rainbow, and Women in Love present sequentially in fictional version Lawrence's own personal journey into self-discovery in the form of a creation myth of sensual love which repeats the archetypal patterns of some of the great mythologies. It is the purpose of the following pages to show how these three novels reveal the major archetypal patterns of mythology as suggested by Joseph Campbell in his study, The Hero with A Thousand Faces.
Date: August 1968
Creator: Hoffmann, Dorothy A.

The Moral Judgments of Jane Austen

Description: It is the purpose of this thesis to examine the relevance of Jane Austen's moral and social judgments for the twentieth century, in terms of insight into human nature and human relationships and of a realistic and penetrating treatment of the moral and social problems most vital to moiety in the 1960's.
Date: August 1968
Creator: Thornton, Katherine

Philosophical Ideas in Five Plays by Jean-Paul Sartre

Description: The drama of Jean-Paul Sartre is primarily an investigation into the meaning of the human condition. The question of primary concern is: What does it mean to be a human being? Through his drama, Sartre reveals the nature of the existential situation. This thesis looks at five plays of Sartre and discusses the philosophical ideas in each.
Date: June 1968
Creator: Portman, Stephen G.

The Poetry of Emily Dickinson and Edna St. Vincent Millay

Description: Millay and Dickinson, born more than sixty years apart, were subject to vastly different influences and environments, although their homes were in the same geographic area. Their poetry reflects the difference of their times and their own temperament, but both wrote from a great depth and understanding of feeling and experience about subjects common to all mankind - death, love, anguish, the significance of nature.
Date: August 1968
Creator: McDonald, Henry Sue