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An Analysis of Arnold Schoenberg's Suite for Piano, Op. 25

Description: It now seems necessary to follow the further development of Schoenberg and his first pupils, Berg and Webern. "Starting from their twin conceptions of the dethronement of tonality and the free use of the former 'discords', they produced a series of pieces of which the foremost characteristics were their extreme expressiveness and their extraordinary brevity."
Date: August 1962
Creator: Mayhew, Thomas E. (Thomas Elmo)

Analysis of the Song Cycle “On Wenlock Edge” by Ralph Vaughan Williams

Description: This examination of Ralph Vaughan Williams' song cycle to poetry of Alfred Edward Housman, "On Wenlock Edge," will follow primarily two avenues of approach. First, following a brief biographical sketch of Vaughan Williams' career prior to the composition of "On Wenlock Edge," will be a discussion of Vaughan Williams' and Housman's respective aesthetic philosophies. In order to lay the background for certain salient characteristics of this cycle, parallels as well as differences in their artistic thinking will be explained. Secondly, a poetic analysis will precede the musical analysis of each song in order to differentiate between the original intent of the poet and the interpretation of the poetry by Vaughan Williams.
Date: January 1965
Creator: Pummill, John Douglas

An Analytical Critique of the Use of Twelve Equal Tones as Utilized in "Sonata-Fantasia" by George Rochberg

Description: This thesis centers around a certain twentieth-century compositionaI device, the method of composition with twelve tones. There are many terms to designate this device, for example: "basic set," "tone-row," "note-series," "serialism," "serial technique," "twelve-note series," "twelve-tone technique" or "twelve-tone method." TI is thesis is a methodical research demonstrating the contemporary conventional way of scientifically and artfully manipulating twelve equal tempered degrees of the chromatic scale to produce a desirable system. In order to arrive at any substantial conclusions, it is necessary to make a critical examination and evaluation of known twelve-tone compositional procedures from as many angles as possible, so as virtually to exhaust every practical and speculative potentiality included in the technique, that is, within the range and limits of our present needs. This examination and evaluation will also involve a comparative investigation of various uses of the device, in order to produce and suggest ideas for further theoretical insights. The ultimate purpose of this thesis is to pinpoint the "hows" and "whys" of Rochberg's use of the twelve equal tones in Sonata-Fantasia.
Date: July 1968
Creator: Tiroff, Philip Knight

An Analytical Study of Solos for Beginning College Voice Students

Description: The object of this study was to compile a list of solo literature for beginning college voice students and analyze these solos for pedagogical and performance purposes. There is no lack of printed material on the subjects of singing and voice culture. But it is not readily accessible to teachers since it is extremely diversified and rather diffusely distributed throughout a variety of sources, such as books, periodicals, and scientific papers. Several lists and books containing songs for beginners have been compiled.
Date: August 1968
Creator: Bryant, Karen Sue

Ariettes Oubilées and Fêtes Galantes, Series I and II by Claude Debussy

Description: Not only did Debussy find the Symbolist movement a source of inspiration for his artistic aims, he often selected his literary collaborators from them. Pelleas et Melisande, Prelude a l'Apres-midi d'un Faune, Chansons de Bilitis, Trois Pomes de Stephane Mallarme, Fetes Galantes, Ariettes Oubliees, all had Symbolist authors. Moreover, the poetic style of the Proses Lyriques, of which Debussy himself was the author, is in the Symbolist manner.
Date: January 1960
Creator: Pannell, Frankie Franks

Aspects of Idiomatic Harmony in the Harpsichord Sonatas of Domenico Scarlatti

Description: Most of Domenico Scarlatti's harmonic progressions are quite orthodox when considered abstractly or free of their positioning in the score. The harmonic movement is given interest by subtle alterations in time; for example, (1) simultaneous upper and lower voices of different lengths, when repeated several times, change their relationship with each other; (2) one voice may be simply delayed so that it lags behind the other voice, thus combining to produce irregular harmonic sound on many succeeding beats; (3) the combination of two or more chords appearing on one beat is similar to number (2) but does not necessarily occur more than once.
Date: June 1961
Creator: Williams, Wiley John

Audio-Visual Materials for the Primary Music Classroom

Description: The purpose of this problem was to select audio-visual materials that would enhance the teaching of music in the primary grades. Since audio-visual equipment and materials have gained a place of prominence in the modern education program, the teachers, administrators, and even the architects need to be cognizant of their possibilities and applications. Audio-visual aids should be investigated to disclose ways of improving their utilization in the learning process through the stimulation of the following human senses: sight, hearing, and touch. The results of many experimental research studies in the field of audio-visual education have proved that the application of audio-visual devices in the classroom greatly improves both understanding and retention as compared to conventional teaching methods. It is hoped that the identification, enumeration, and suggestions for utilization of audio-visual aids presented in this study will motivate the reader to give further attention to audio-visual materials as applied to his specific situation, with the awareness of their unlimited possibilities in increasing understandings through sensory experiences.
Date: January 1967
Creator: Mathesen, Nancy A. (Nancy Ann)

The Bass Trombone and Its Use in Selected Works of Smetana, Borodin, Tchaikovsky, and Dvorak

Description: The selected works by the composers studied in this thesis might well stand as illustrative of the normal development of the use of the bass trombone near the close of the nineteenth century. Although notable progress was made by the cited composers in increasing the bass trombone's usefulness in the orchestra, each composer also continued to use the bass trombone as it had been used in previous years, such as in doubling bass parts, harmonic backgrounds, and for strong rhythmic punctuations.
Date: August 1969
Creator: Kesting, Gary Walther

The Basset Horn: Its Development and Literature

Description: The purpose of this study is to trace the development of a practically extinct woodwind instrument, the basset horn, and its use by composers as both a solo and an orchestral instrument. The first chapter concerns the development of the basset horn from the earliest imperfect specimen to the modern-day instrument. The second chapter deals with the physical characteristics that are peculiar to the instrument. The third chapter discusses the literature and musical history of the basset horn. An appendix provides a comprehensive listing of literature for the instrument.
Date: August 1968
Creator: Shanley, Richard A.

Blend in Choral Sound

Description: There is a need for a systematic collection of ideas concerning blend in choral sound. Many authorities discuss blend, but their concepts of the term are very divergent. These divergent concepts lead to emphasis of various factors which are important to the development or achievement of blend in choral sound. This emphasis in turn leads to various methods of achieving blend. Authorities ascribe several definitions to the term blend, as it relates to choral tone. These definitions should be studied collectively in order that a clearer concept of the term blend in choral sound may be developed. In studying blend in choral sound, several factors are generally deemed important. No study has been made which leads to a consensus concerning the relative importance of these factors. Scientific studies have been made of these factors, but the results have not been compiled and presented in one source. Authorities employ various methods in working with the factors which affect blend in choral sound. No study has been made which includes these methods. It is hoped that this study will contribute to the collecting and organizing of ideas regarding blend, including its various definitions and its important factors. It is also hoped that this study will contribute to the understanding of these factors as they relate to the achievement of blend in choral sound. It is intended that this study will present this information in such a manner as to be of assistance to the musician in the field of choral music.
Date: January 1967
Creator: Wyatt, Larry Douglas, 1943-

The Brass Instruments as Used by Brahms in His Four Symphonies

Description: Instead of putting the emphasis on color in his orchestration, Brahms felt that the music was more important; not the orchestration. However, it would be a mistake to feel that he was deaf to orchestral color. When discussing color in regard to Brahms' orchestration it is necessary to realize that his use of color is much different than that of his contemporaries. This thesis discusses the four symphonies of Brahms and his usage of brass instruments within these symphonies, specifically the french horn, trumpet, trombone and tuba. It is apparent that he used considerable care in writing for the brasses as well as the other instruments and had complete command of the use of their individual colors.
Date: August 1964
Creator: Ritter, David G.

The British Museum Manuscript Additional 35087: A Transcription of the French, Italian, and Latin Compositions with Concordance and Commentary

Description: The London British Museum Manuscript Additional 35087, hereafter referred to as London Add. 35087, is an important parchment manuscript in large octavo choirbook arrangement from the beginning of the sixteenth century. Its measurements are 19.4 x 29.3 centimeters. The manuscript contains ninety-five folios and one stub where a leaf has been torn out (f. 4).1 The last composition in the manuscript is incomplete, which indicates that one leaf is lacking at the end (f. 96). Two sets of foliation are shown: the original Roman and a more recent Arabic. Both are placed in the upper right hand corner of folio recto. The sets agree in folios 4-93. Folios 1 and 2 show no Roman figures now; folio 3 has "ii," and therefore the missing leaf probably had "iii." The Arabic numbering does not account for this missing leaf. This folio might have been assigned "4," but this number is given on the next complete leaf to coincide with the Roman "iiii." At the end, by mistake, folio 94 has "xciii" and folio 95 has "xciiii."
Date: August 1967
Creator: McMurtry, William M.

The Chaconne and Passacaglia in Twentieth Century Organ Music

Description: In order to trace the origin of the chaconne and passacaglia, the much larger classification of basso ostinato, of which the chaconne and passacaglia are two later examples, must be considered. According to one authority, Lili Propper, the earliest beginnings of the basso ostinato can be traced back to the Middle Ages through the use of organ points exemplified in organum purum. A later and more developed use of the basso ostinato can be discovered in the recurring basses of the Montpellier Codex and the masses of the fifteenth century. A freer manifestation of the idea can be found in the reiterated bass motive of the familiar canon, Sumer is icumen in.
Date: January 1966
Creator: Tiller, Barney

Chopin's Mazurka: A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of J.S. Bach, F. Busoni, D. Scarlatti, W.A. Mozart, L.V. Beethoven, F. Schubert, F. Chopin, M. Ravel and K. Szymanowski

Description: This dissertation consists of four programs: one lecture- recital, two recitals for piano solo, and one (the Schubert program) in combination with other instruments. The repertoire of the complete series of concerts was chosen with the intention of demonstrating the ability of the performer to project music of various types and composed in different periods.
Date: August 1969
Creator: Drath, Jan

Choral Problems in Handel's Messiah

Description: The purpose of this study was to investigate, through stylistic analysis, the choral problems in twelve selected choruses from George Frederick Handel's oratorio, Messiah. The twelve choruses were selected for analysis in this study after consultation with several authorities in the field of choral music and on the basis that they are representative of problems encountered in the remaining choruses. Each of the twelve choruses was analyzed individually. Chapter I of this study presents the purpose of the study, the sub-problems involved, definitions of terms, delimitations, the basic hypothesis of the study, the basic assumptions of the study, methodology and the plan of the report. Chapter II of this study contains a brief biographical sketch of Handel, a discussion of the circumstances surrounding the composition of Messiah, and a survey of the Handelian oratorio Chorus. Chapter III presents the results of the analysis relevant to a discussion of each of the twelve choruses followed by a sectional presentation of the choral problems. In Chapter IV, a summary, some conclusions and recommendations are offered. Appendices A and B present reviews of selected recordings and vocal-piano editions of Messiah respectively.
Date: May 1968
Creator: Williams, John J. (John Joseph)

Choral Problems in the Unaccompanied Music of Francis Poulenc

Description: The purpose of this study, ve to analyze the stylistic characteristics in the unaccompanied music of one twentieth century composer, Francis Poulenc, in order to discover the choral problems which would confront choruses and conductors as they performed his music. It is hoped that this study will not only enable choral conductors to better understand, interpret, and appreciate the music of Poulenc, but also will serve as a guide toward the investigation of other twentieth century composers and their works.
Date: January 1966
Creator: Barnard, Jack Richard, 1932

Clavecin Pieces of Louis Couperin

Description: Louis Couperin (c. 1626-1661) was an outstanding member of the seventeenth-century clavecin school and an important link in the Couperin dynasty. His works for the harpsichord, or clavecin, have been neglected. This is due primarily to the fact that there are relatively few of his works, in comparison with those of his nephew, Franois Couperin Le Grand, who greatly overshadows him. Louis wrote no treatise on how his works are to be played, and there are few accounts of him, or his works, that are written in English. There is no biography of Louis Couperin. A more detailed study should be made of his music and its place in the French clavecin literature. Before examiinig the music itself, however, it is necessary to trace the origins and development of the clavecin school and its style.
Date: January 1968
Creator: Hudgens, Cecilia K. Knox

A Comparison of Formal and Structural Principles in the Concerti Grossi of Corelli's Opus VI and Vivaldi's Opus III

Description: The comparison of structural and formal traits in the concert grossi of Corelli's Opus VI and Vivaldi's Opus III will proceed in the following manner: first, the cycle as a whole will be taken up; next, the individual movements will be considered. Finally, in each instance of comparison, Corelli's music will be dealt with first.
Date: August 1968
Creator: Hart, Euclid August

A Comparison of the Variation Technique Employed by Beethoven and Copland

Description: Draws a comparison between the piano variation techniques of Beethoven and Copland with reference only to the two works discussed herein, Thirty-Two Variations and Piano Variations, with the intent of gaining from these isolated examples knowledge of the changes in variation writing from Beethoven's time to the present.
Date: May 1964
Creator: Parrish, Mary Kay, 1940-

A Comparison of the Variation Technique Employed by Beethoven and Copland

Description: Aaron Copland was born of Russian-Jewish parents on November 14, 1900. Harris Kaplan, his father, had acquired the American equivalent of his name when an immigration official at the British port of entry wrote it on his papers, and from then on the family name was "Copland." Sarah Mittenthal and Harris Copland met at a family social gathering in New York and were married in 1885. They lived in the upper stories of his department store in Brooklyn which remained the family home until 1924 and was where Aaron, the youngest of five, was born.
Date: May 1964
Creator: Higginbotham, Mary Kay

Contemporary Plans for Training the Boy's Changing Voice

Description: The purpose of this study is to describe contemporary plans for training the boy's changing voice and to prescribe ensemble material for these voices. Specific Problems: Analysis of the general problem leads to subordinate questions, or sub-problems, which may be stated as follows: 1. What are the contemporary plans of training the boy's changing voice? 2. What are the most usable musical materials available for use by ensembles which include boys with changing voices?
Date: January 1964
Creator: Cox, Rolla Kenneth

Elements of Verismo in Selected Operas of Giuseppe Verdi

Description: In music, the term verismo usually refers to a realistic or naturalistic movement in Italian operas of the late nineteenth century. From the dawn of Italian opera four features have been manifested--umanita (humanism), sincerity (sincerity), passione (passion), effetto (not only theatrical effect but the supreme dramatic moment). The elements of verismo are among the characteristics present in the operas of Giuseppe Verdi where they reached a zenith of development. It is upon these veristic aspects, as identified in the second chapter, that the operas Cavalleria Rusticana and Pagliacci were based. Rigoletto, Il Trovatore, and La Traviata richly exhibit these elements of verismo which have been identified in the fourth chapter.
Date: August 1968
Creator: Morgan, Ann Shands

The Evolution of Musical Pitch Standards

Description: The purpose of this study is to show how standards of pitch became a matter of importance in musical performance. The existence of innumerable varieties of pitches was not an actual handicap in a time when voices were accompanied by only one instrument, or when a singer accompanied himself. But when instruments began to be used with the church organ, and ensembles were formed to play in the royal courts, a standard pitch was found to be desirable. Many factors were involved in the adjustments of pitch as small ensembles evolved into the military band and the symphony orchestra. An attempt will be made to show how many of the standards were derived, and what long lasting effects they had.
Date: June 1965
Creator: Kernek, Carol Thompson