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Glass Forming Ability, Magnetic Properties, and Mechanical Behavior of Iron-Based and Cobalt-Based Metallic Glasses

Description: Lack of crystalline order and microstructural features such as grain/grain-boundary in metallic glasses results in a suite of remarkable attributes including very high strength, close to theoretical elasticity, high corrosion and wear resistance, and soft magnetic properties. In particular, low coercivity and high permeability of iron and cobalt based metallic glass compositions could potentially lead to extensive commercial use as magnetic heads, transformer cores, circuits and magnetic shields. In the current study, few metallic glass compositions were synthesized by systematically varying the iron and cobalt content. Thermal analysis was done and included the measurement of glass transition temperature, crystallization temperature, and the enthalpies of relaxation and crystallization. Magnetic properties of the alloys were determined including saturation magnetization, coercivity, and Curie temperature. The coercivity was found to decrease and the saturation magnetization was found to increase with the increase in iron content. The trend in thermal stability, thermodynamic properties, and magnetic properties was explained by atomic interactions between the ferromagnetic metals and the metalloids atoms in the amorphous alloys. Mechanical behavior of iron based metallic glasses was evaluated in bulk form as well as in the form of coatings. Iron based amorphous powder was subjected to high power mechanical milling and the structural changes were evaluated as a function of time. Using iron-based amorphous powder precursor, a uniform composite coating was achieved through microwave processing. The hardness, modulus, and wear behavior of the alloys were evaluated using nano-indentation.
Date: December 2014
Creator: Veligatla, Medha

Thin Films As a Platform for Understanding the Conversion Mechanism of FeF2 Cathodes in Lithium-Ion Microbatteries

Description: Conversion material electrodes such as FeF2 possess the potential to deliver transformative improvements in lithium ion battery performance because they permit a reversible change of more than one Li-ion per 3d metal cation. They outperform current state of the art intercalation cathodes such as LiCoO2, which have volumetric and gravimetric energy densities that are intrinsically limited by single electron transfer. Current studies focus on composite electrodes that are formed by mixing with carbon (FeF2-C), wherein the carbon is expected to act as a binder to support the matrix and facilitate electronic conduction. These binders complicate the understanding of the electrode-electrolyte interface (SEI) passivation layer growth, of Li agglomeration, of ion and electron transport, and of the basic phase transformation processes under electrochemical cycling. This research uses thin-films as a model platform for obtaining basic understanding to the structural and chemical foundations of the phase conversion processes. Thin film cathodes are free of the binders used in nanocomposite structures and may potentially provide direct basic insight to the evolution of the SEI passivation layer, electron and ion transport, and the electrochemical behavior of true complex phases. The present work consisted of three main tasks (1) Development of optimized processes to deposit FeF2 and LiPON thin-films with the required phase purity and microstructure; (2) Understanding their electron and ion transport properties and; (3) Obtaining insight to the correlation between structure and capacity in thin-film microbatteries with FeF2 thin-film cathode and LiPON thin-film solid electrolyte. Optimized pulsed laser deposition (PLD) growth produced polycrystalline FeF2 films with excellent phase purity and P42/mnm crystallographic symmetry. A schematic band diagram was deduced using a combination of UPS, XPS and UV-Vis spectroscopies. Room temperature Hall measurements reveal that as-deposited FeF2 is n-type with an electron mobility of 0.33 cm2/V.s and a resistivity was 0.255 Ω.cm. The LiPON ...
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Date: August 2015
Creator: Santos-Ortiz, Reinaldo