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The Effect of Nine Diet and Water Combinations on the Culture Health of Ceriodaphnia Dubia

Description: Culture health of Ceriodaphnia dubia was evaluated for organisms cultured using all combinations of three foods and three waters. Criteria used to assess health of cultures included adult and neonate weights, time required to produce first broods, neonate production, adult survival, and resistance to hexavalent chromium. Diet/water combinations which produced the most neonates were not found to produce adults which were more resistant to chromium than those which produced fewer neonates. Of those evaluated, a diet of Selenastrum capricornutum and a yeast-trout chow-cereal leaf mixture was best for culturing and testing Ceriodaphnia. The best synthetic water tested was a mixture of nine parts reconstituted hard water and one part bottled mineral water.
Date: May 1990
Creator: Patterson, Paul W. (Paul William)

Opioid/Adrenergic Interaction in Regulating Canine Cardiac Function

Description: Opioid/adrenergic interactions were studied to evaluate two hypotheses: (1) naloxone potentiates the effect of epinephrine on cardiac contractility by increasing circulating epinephrine concentrations; and (2) endogenous and exogenous opioids alter left cardiac nerve stimulationinduced norepinephrine release and cardiac function. A canine isolated heart-lung preparation was used for the first study. Plasma epinephrine was determined and myocardial epinephrine uptake was calculated during intravenous epinephrine infusion. Naloxone (4 mg) was given and the epinephrine infusion was repeated. Naloxone increased cardiac contractility, coronary blood flow, and the coronary sinus epinephrine concentration. When coronary blood flow was subsequently held constant (100% above resting), naloxone increased only contractility. This result indicated that the previously observed increase in coronary sinus epinephrine was flow dependent. Corticosterone (an uptake II blocker) was employed as a positive control. Corticosterone increased the contractile response to epinephrine, but unlike naloxone, corticosterone was accompanied by a clear decrease in myocardial epinephrine uptake. The stereospecificity of the response to naloxone was investigated and (+) naloxone equaled or exceeded (-) naloxone in potentiating the inotropic effect of epinephrine. In the second study, the left cardiac nerve was isolated and electrically stimulated in intact dogs. Norepinephrine overflow gradually declined during successive control stimulations. Pretreatment with naloxone (100 Mg/kg) prevented or delayed the decline. An intracoronary dynorphin 1-9 infusion (2 nmol/min/kg for 20 minutes) reduced both norepinephrine overflow and cardiac performance, and both effects were prevented by pretreatment with naloxone (100 /xg/kg) . To summarize, naloxone potentiated the inotropic effect of infused epinephrine without altering circulating epinephrine concentrations or myocardial epinephrine uptake. This effect of naloxone was not stereospecific and probably not mediated through a traditional opiate receptor. Endogenous and exogenous opioids inhibited the left cardiac nerve stimulation-induced norepinephrine overflow, suggesting that opiate receptors may regulate cardiac excitability by modulating norepinephrine release.
Date: May 1990
Creator: Gu, Hong

Regulation of Colony-Stimulating Factor-1 Biosynthesis

Description: Recent studies suggest that synthesis of the Colony-stimulating factor (CSF) is a well regulated process. However, the molecular mechanisms of the signal transduction of the various inducers of CSF such as monokines and lymphokines are not well understood. Using Interleukin 1 (IL-1) stimulation of CSF-1 in the MIA PaCa-2 cell line as a model system, the involvement of G-protein has been studied. The IL-1 induction of CSF-1 synthesis can be inhibited by both Pertussis toxin and Cholera toxin, which are known to modify the Gᵢ and Gₛ proteins respectively, thus activating adenylate cyclase to release more cAMP. The toxin inactivation can be prevented by inhibitors of the ADP-ribosylation such as, benzamide and MBAMG. Addition of dibutyryl-cAMP inhibits the IL-1 induced CSF production. Both Theophylline and Forskolin which increase cAMP by inhibiting phosphodiesterase and stimulating adenylate cyclase respectively, also inhibit CSF-1 production. Results from these studies have shown that cAMP level inversely regulates the biosynthesis of CSF-1. Preincubation of MIA PaCa-2 cells with IL-1 and 5'- guanylylimidodiphosphate (GppNHp) prevents the inhibitory effect of pertussis toxin on CSF-1 production. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that IL-1 binds to its receptor and couples to Gᵢ∝ resulting in the inhibition of adenylate cyclase and reducing cAMP level. Lowering of the' cAMP level leads to the activation of CSF-1 gene expression. The activity of another inducer of CSF-1 production in this system, 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), can be abolished by 1- (5-isoquinolinesulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine dihydrochloride (H-7), which is a specific inhibitor of protein kinase C. However, H-7 failed to inhibit IL-1 stimulated CSF-1 production. Other known activators of protein kinase C namely, Ca²⁺ and L-α-l-oleoyl-2-acetoyl-sn- 3-glycerol (OAG), also increase CSF production. On the other hand, Indomethacin which is known to inhibit prostaglandin E (PGE), stimulates CSF-1 production in MIA PaCa-2 cells. These data suggest that different mechanisms ...
Date: May 1990
Creator: Ku, Chun-Ying

Toxicity of Chromium and Fluoranthene From Aqueous and Sediment Sources to Selected Freshwater Fish

Description: Research efforts in aquatic toxicology have historically centered on the chemical analyses and toxic effects of waters to aquatic organisms. More recently, sediment-source toxicity has been explored, with efforts concentrated on establishing sensitive and accurate methodologies. This study focused on the toxicity of trivalent chromium, hexavalent chromium, and fluoranthene to Pimephales promelas, Ictalurus punctatus, and Lepomis macrochirus. Test fish were exposed to both water-borne and sediment-source toxicants for 96 hours (h) and 30 days (d). A 96-h and 30-d LC50 (mg/L Cr, ug/L Fluoranthene) was determined for each fish species exposed to aqueous toxicants. In addition, 96-h and 30-d LC50s were determined for each fish species from sediment chromium concentrations (mg/kg) and sediment fluoranthene concentrations (ug/kg). Although lethality endpoints were used throughout this research, acute effects other than mortality were determined for Lepomis macrochirus exposed to hexavalent chromium. Lethal toxicity values (96-h and 30-d LC50 and their 95% confidence limits) for trivalent chromium could not be determined since trivalent chromium concentations above 6.0 mg/L could not be obtained at water pHs compatible with these fish species. Trivalent chromium addition to test waters at pHs compatible with fish survival resulted in a chromium precipitate that was not lethal to test fish. In contrast, fathead minnows, channel catfish, and bluegill sunfish exposed to hexavalent chromium in water and sediments experienced mortality. Fathead minnows exposed to fluoranthene in water for 96h demonstrated a maximum mortality of 69%, while 100% mortality was achieved with channel catfish in similar tests. Sediment tests with fluoranthene resulted in 100% mortality with both fathead minnows and channel catfish.
Date: May 1990
Creator: Gendusa, Tony C.

The Effects of Long Term Modernate Ethanol Intake on Plasma Levels of ACTH, Beta Endorphin, and Corticosterone in Rats

Description: The effects of single injections and daily oral administration of ethanol on plasma levels of ACTH, beta endorphin, and corticosterone in response to cold stress were examined. The long-term experimental animals were given 0.25 ml of 28% ethanol or water orally once a day, five days a week, for fourteen months. Plasma levels of ACTH, beta endorphin, and corticosterone were lower in alcohol-treated rats as compared with water-treated rats when exposed to cold stress. The effects of a single injection of ethanol significantly elevated plasma levels of all three hormones. Mortality in sham-treated males was higher than ethanol-treated.
Date: December 1990
Creator: Breedlove, Kenneth

Comparative Toxicity of Refuse-Derived Fuel Fly Ash on Two Species of Earthworms, Lumbricus terrestris and E. foetida, Using an Artificial Soil Exposure Protocol

Description: Research estimated toxicity of refuse-derived fuel fly ash (RDF-FA) on two earthworms species, Lumbricus terrestris and Eisenia foetida. Specific objectives were to: (1) Compare their 14-day LC50s under light and dark conditions; (2) separate toxicity due to osmotic, pH and physical factors from that of heavy metal contaminants; (3) compare relative differences of artificial soil and commercial soil as exposure media for evaluating toxicity to earthworms. The 14-d LC50s for L. terrestris in dark and light were 57.0 and 48.34 % RDF-FA, and 59.25 and 41.00 % RDF-FA for E. foetida using artificial soil. All of the toxicity resulted from heavy metals within the RDF-FA. Using L. terrestris, the LC50s for artificial soil and commercial soil were 52.30 and 64.34%.
Date: May 1991
Creator: Jahani, Aghamolla

Pyrethroid Insecticide Effects on Bluegill Sunfish (Lepomis Macrochirus) and the Impacts of Bluegill Predation on Invertebrates in Microcosms

Description: Concurrent outdoor aquatic 1950 L microcosm and 0.04 ha mesocosm experiments with bluegill sunfish evaluated the ecological impact of cyfluthrin. Cyfluthrin effects were not observed on mesocosm bluegill; a slight decrease in growth was observed in the microcosm bluegill. Otolith weight to length relationships between bluegill size-classes from microcosms, local streams, and a fish hatchery revealed no differences. Our results indicated bluegill predation impacts were slight on benthic invertebrates. Extensive predation on emerging insects was observed. Microcosm bluegill impacts on zooplankton populations followed expected predation effects, resulting in larger populations of smaller taxa. Bluegill functioned as "keystone" predators for microcosm taxa and improved taxa richness for benthic colonizing invertebrates and zooplankton.
Date: May 1991
Creator: Morris, Rodney Gregg

Characterization of Pyrimidine Biosynthesis in Pseudomonas putida Using Mutant and Wild Type Strains

Description: The biosynthesis of pyrimidines in Pseudomonas putida was investigated. In this study, pyrimidine requiring mutants were isolated by conventional mutagenesis and enrichment. The strains required exogenously supplied pyrimidines for growth and were found by enzyme assays to be deficient for the product of the pyrB gene encoding the enzyme aspartate transcarbamoylase. None of the intermediates of the pathway could supply the auxotrophic requirement of the strain; only preformed pyrimidines, metabolized via salvage pathways could suffice. Pyrimidine limitation in the mutant caused a slight but significant fifty per cent increase in expression of all the de novo biosynthetic enzymes. Pyrimidine starvation's effect on nucleotide pool levels was examined in the mutant and caused a marked swelling of the purine nucleotide pools.
Date: August 1991
Creator: Chang, Mingren

The Effects of Long Term Moderate Ethanol Intake on the Immune Response in Rats

Description: Using a rat model, the effects of a single dose or six to twelve months of daily oral administration of ethanol on the immune system were determined. The rats were challenged with sheep red blood cells after the various dosing periods to elicit an immune response. Immune system responsiveness was determined by means of white blood cell counts and differentials, antibody titers, and T-cell numbers. No deleterious effects of the ethanol on the immune response were seen, while the female alcohol-fed rats showed a significant increase in T-Cell numbers, white blood cell counts, and lymphocytes over the sham group.
Date: August 1991
Creator: Follin, Cynthia A. (Cynthia Ann)

Mitochondrial DNA Restriction Site Analysis of the Phylogeny of the Truei and Boylii Species Groups of the Rodent Genus Peromyscus (Cricetidae)

Description: The phylogenetics of eight species of the Peromyscus truei and P. boylii species groups from 15 populations were analyzed based on mitochondrial DNA sequence differentiation, using 13 hexanucleotide specific restriction enzymes. P. difficilis, P. nasutus, and P. attwateri were found to be members of the same clade. P. leucopus was not found to be closely related to any of the species of the boylii or truei species groups. Phylogenetic interpretations for the remaining species differed based on Wagner and Dollo parsimony analyses. P. true appears to be most closely related to P. gratus based on Wagner parsimony and the phenetic analysis, while the relationship of P. gratus to other species could not be resolved based on Dollo parsimony.
Date: August 1991
Creator: DeWalt, Theresa Spradling

Toxicity of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (Aroclor 1254) on the Earthworm Eisenia foetida

Description: Objectives were to: (1) assess toxicity of polychlorinated biphenyls on Eisenia foetida, in terms of survival (LC5O/LD5O), and suppression of coelomocytes to form secretory (SR) and erythrocyte rosettes (ER) with, and to phagocytize rabbit erythrocytes; and (2) compare results with those of Lumbricus terrestris to assess relative sensitivities to PCB. Using 5-d filter paper contact exposure protocol, LC50 and LD50 were 30.4 cg/cm2 and 4450 cg/g dry mass, respectively. Nominal PCB exposure concentrations of 5.0 and 10.0 pg/cm2 resulted in tissue levels of 1389 and 2895 pg/g dry mass causing a significant reduction in SR formation by 18 and 52%, respectively. ER formation and phagocytosis were reduced significantly (52 and 61%) only at the higher tissue concentration. Compared to reported data on lethality and immunomodulation in L. terrestris, E. foetida appears to be more resistant.
Date: August 1991
Creator: Sassani, Rain

Interactions among Temperature, pH, and Cyfluthrin on Survival of the Fathead Minnow Pimephales promelas

Description: The 96-hr LC50 of cyfluthrin in Pimephales promelas ata temperature of 23*C and a pH of 8 was 1.08 g/L. The toxicity of cyfluthrin was inversely related to temperature and pH. A temperature of 10*C and a pH of 6 significantly decreased the 96-hr LC50 to 0.009 gg/L. Likewise, sublethal exposures to cyfluthrin significantly affected the fathead minnow's ability to tolerate high and low temperatures. Cyfluthrin compromised the fathead minnow's lower temperature tolerance (CTMin) by 60C and the upper temperature tolerance (CTMax) by 20C. Although cyfluthrin may not be present in the environment in large amounts due to its physical and chemical properties, small concentrations ( g/L) may adversely affect fish populations.
Date: December 1991
Creator: Heath, Susan M.

Isolation, Characterization and Physiological Studies of Cyanide-Utilizing Bacteria

Description: Ten bacteria capable of growth on the metal-cyano complex, tetracyanonickelate (II) {K2 [Ni(CN)J } (TCN), supplied as the sole nitrogen source, were isolated. Seven isolates were identified as pseudomonads while the remaining three were classified as Klebsiella species. In addition to TCN, all isolates were able to utilize KCN although it was significantly more toxic. The degradation of TCN was most complete when supplied at growth-limiting concentrations, did not occur when ammonia was present, and resulted in the formation of nickel cyanide [Ni(CN)2] as a degradation product.
Date: December 1991
Creator: Silva Avalos, Juan G. (Juan Guillermo)

Physiological Ecology, Population Genetic Responses and Assemblage Stability of Fishes in Two Southwestern Intermittent Stream Systems

Description: Six sites within the Denton and Hickory Creek watersheds were sampled over three years to assess the impact of seasonal intermittent stream conditions on the ichthyofauna. An integrated approach using field and laboratory techniques was employed to evaluate the responses of the fishes.
Date: December 1991
Creator: Rutledge, Charles Jerry, 1941-

Physiological Effects of Ascaris Suum Intestinal Microflora on 5-Hydroxytryptamine Level and Binding Sites in the Intestinal Epithelial Cells

Description: Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) has been shown to activate carbohydrate metabolism in adult female Ascaris suum. Serotonin may be either absorbed directly from the environment or synthesized de novo from the absorbed L-tryptophan in adult female A. suum. The enzymes necessary for the synthesis of 5-HT have been identified in both intestine and muscle tissues. The serotonin absorbed from the environment is obtained either from the host's gastrointestinal contents or from the 5-HT producing bacteria in the intestine of A. suum. Numerous 5-HT producing bacteria were identified in the intestinal microflora. The physiological contributions of 5-HT producing bacteria to the 5-HT level, turnover and binding sites in the intestinal tissue of A. suum were investigated.
Date: December 1991
Creator: Shahkolahi, Akbar Mohammadpour

Pyrimidine Nucleoside Metabolism in Pseudomonads and Enteric Bacteria

Description: Metabolic differences in the strategies used for pyrimidine base and nucleoside salvage were studied in the pseudomonads and enteric bacteria. Fluoro--analogs were used to select mutant strains of E. coli, S. typhimurium, P. putida, and P. aeruginosa blocked in one or more of the uracil and uridine salvage enzymes. HPLC analysis of cell-free extracts from wild-type and mutant strains examined the effectiveness of the selections. Evidence was found for cytidine kinase in Pseudomonas and for an activity that converted uracil compounds to cytosine compounds. Using media supplemented with 150 μg of orotic acid per ml, P. putida SOC 1, a Pyr, upp mutant which utilizes orotic acid as a pyrimidine source was isolated for the first time in any study.
Date: December 1991
Creator: Scott, Allelia Worrall

Blood Pressure Regulation During Simulated Orthostatism Prior to and Following Endurance Exercise Training

Description: Cardiovascular responses and tolerance to an orthostatic stress were examined in eight men before and after eight months of endurance exercise training. Following training, maximal oxygen consumption and blood volume were increased, and resting heart rate reduced. Orthostatic tolerance was reduced following training in all eight subjects. It was concluded that prolonged endurance training decreased orthostatic tolerance and this decrease in tolerance appeared associated with attenuated baroreflex sensitivity and alterations in autonomic balance secondary to an increased parasympathetic tone noted with training.
Date: May 1992
Creator: Stevens, Glen Harold John

Construction of a Cloning Vector Based upon a Rhizobium Plasmid Origin of Replication and its Application to Genetic Engineering of Rhizobium Strains

Description: Rhizobia are Gram-negative, rod-shaped, soil bacteria with the ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen into ammonia as symbiont bacteroids within nodules of leguminous plant roots. Here, resident Rhizobium plasmids were studied as possible sources of components for the construction of a cloning vector for Rhizobium species.
Date: May 1992
Creator: Jeong, Pyengsoo

Enzyme Assays Using Earthworms for Assessing Innate and Nonspecific Immunotoxicity of Xenobiotics

Description: Principal objectives of my research were to: (1) report for the first time that coelomocytes are able to reduce NBT dye and confirm the presence of lysozyme-like activity in earthworm; (2) develop a standard methodology for determination of NBT reduction and lysozyme-like activity in earthworms; (3) compare NBT reduction and lysozyme-like activity in earthworms with those of murine and human cells and fluids; and (4) demonstrate the sensitivity of earthworm NBT reduction and lysozyme-like activity as the assays using matrics in refuse-derived fuel fly ash (RDFF) and CuSO4.
Date: May 1992
Creator: Chen, Shing-Chong

Molecular and Kinetic Characterization of the Aspartate Transcarbamoylase Dihydroorotase Complex in Pseudomonas putida

Description: Aerobic Gram negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas putida were reported to possess class A ATCases and to have a M.W. of 360 kD. The nucleotide sequence of the P. putida pyrBC was determined to answer this question once and for all. The expected regulatory gene was not found. It is shown that the P. putida pyrB gene is overlapped by pyrC by 4 bp. The P.putida pyrB is 1005 bp (335 aa) in length and the pyrC is 1275 bp (425 aa) long. Both of these genes complement E. coli mutants with their respective genotypes. Another finding borne out from the sequence is an effector binding site at the N-terminus of pyrB of P. putIda. The binding site shows that effectors compete with carbamoylphosphate for the active site. In this dissertation, it is shown that the ATCase of P.putida is a trimer of M.W. of 109 kD (3 x 36.4 kD) and that the gene encoding pyrB is overlapped by the pyrC gene which encodes DHOase. It is also shown that the pyrBC encoded enzymes copurify as a dodecameric complex with a M.W. of 484 kD.
Date: May 1992
Creator: Schurr, Michael J. (Michael John)

Stock and Species Identification of Selected Marine Fishes and Shellfishes Using Allozyme Analysis and Isoelectric Focusing: Implications for Texas Fisheries Management

Description: Allozyme frequencies and general protein patterns were surveyed among selected Texas marine fishes and shellfishes to illustrate the application of biochemical genetic techniques to stock and species identification in fisheries management.
Date: May 1992
Creator: King, Timothy L. (Timothy Lee)

The Stress Protein Response of Pimephales promelas to Copper

Description: Organisms synthesize stress proteins in response to a variety of stressors. The 68/70-kDa proteins (synonymous to the 72/73-kDa proteins) have shown to be the most promising stress proteins, and have been proposed as a biomarker of general organismal stress. The 68/70-kDa proteins were used in an antigen/antibody based approach to determine the duration of the stress protein response of Pimephales promelas following an acute exposure to copper sulphate.
Date: May 1992
Creator: Covington, Sean M.

Subcloning and Nucleotide Sequence of Two Positive Acting Regulatory Genes, xy1R and xy1S, from the Pseudomonas putida HS1 TOL Plasmid PDK1

Description: TOL plasmids of Pseudomonas putida encode enzymes for the degradation of toluene and related aromatics. These genes are organized into two operons regulated by the Xy1R and Xy1S transcriptional activators. Previous analysis of the TOL pDK1 catechol-2,3-dioxygenase gene (xy1E) and a comparison of this gene to xy1E from the related TOL plasmid pWW0, revealed the existance of a substantial level of sequence homology (82%).
Date: May 1992
Creator: Chang, Teh-Tsai

Ephippia Production, Activation, and Use of Ex-Ephippio Neonates of Ceriodaphnia Dubia as Toxicity Test Organisms

Description: Ceriodaphnia dubia is widely used as a test organism in monitoring water quality. At the present time, cultures must be continuously maintained in the laboratory. In an attempt to avoid continuous culture and maintenance, the hatching of ephippial eggs of C. dubia would provide test organisms when needed. In order to determine the parameters required for maximum hatching, approximately ninety-four thousand ephippia were exposed to a variety of conditions ranging from light and temperature regimes to drying and freezing. A low hatching yield occurred which is believed to be caused by diminished ephippia viability and/or fertility. To evaluate factors influencing the viability and fertility rate, stains of embryos were examined as were male to female ratios and mating experiments.
Date: August 1992
Creator: Poage, Duane W.