UNT Libraries - Browse

ABOUT BROWSE FEED

A Characterization of Liver Glyoxalase I From Normal Mice and Mice Bearing Lymphosarcoma

Description: The purpose of this investigation was (1) to isolate and purify glyoxalase I from the livers of normal DBA/lJ mice and the livers from mice bearing a lymphosarcoma tumor; and (2) to determine, at least with respect to glyoxalase I, if the tumor has an effect on the chemical properties or structure of macromolecules in an organ removed from tumor locale and not histologically affected by its presence.
Date: August 1970
Creator: Strzinek, Robert Alfred

Food, Feeding Selectivity, and Ecological Efficiencies of Fundulus notatus (Rafinesque) (Osteichthyes; Cyprinodontidae)

Description: This study was made to further define the trophic dynamics of Fundulus notatus by determining its ration composition under natural conditions, measuring feeding selectivity under various laboratory conditions of prey-species composition and availability, and determining the efficiencies with which F. notatus utilizes ingested chironomid larvae.
Date: August 1970
Creator: Atmar, Gerald Legare

The Influence of a Return of Native Grasslands upon the Ecology and Distribution of Small Rodents in Big Bend National Park

Description: In the southwestern United States there is a delicate balance between the existing grasslands and the rodent fauna. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the influence of secondary succession of native grasslands upon the ecology and distribution of small rodents. Two methods of determining the rodent species were plot quadrates and trap lines using Sherman live traps.
Date: August 1971
Creator: Baccus, John T.

Effects of Carbaryl (1-Naphthyl-n-methylcarbamate) on Trichocorixa Reticulata (Hemiptera: Corixidae) and Glyptotendipes Barbipes (Diptera: Chironomidae)

Description: My study of the effects of carbaryl in aquatic systems under controlled laboratory conditions emphasized four major objectives: (1) to determine the acute toxicity of carbaryl to the herbivorous adult and immature Trichocorixa reticulata (Guerin)(Hemiptera: Corixidae), and to the omnivorous larvae of Glyptotendipes barbipes (Staeger) (Diptera: Chironomidae) under static bioassay; (2) to adapt a quantitative method of analysis for carbaryl in water and whole insect tissue extract; (3) to measure the accumulation of the insecticide by G. barbipes under static exposure; and (4) to quantify the uptake and loss of carbaryl by G. barbipes under daily-renewed sublethal dosages.
Date: December 1971
Creator: Gash, Stephen L.

Studies on the Morphology and Biology of Cotton Rats (Sigmodon hispidus) from Northern Mexico to Southern Nebraska

Description: This investigation was designed to evaluate the need for retaining both Sigmodon hispidus texianus and Sigmodon hispidus berlandieri as subspecific designations. An attempt was made to demonstrate bioclimatic variation and reproductive seasonality in cotton rats. The validity of applying the results of isolated studies of cotton rat populations to the species as a whole was examined.
Date: December 1971
Creator: Cleveland, Arthur Gordon

Lipids and Phospholipase Activity of Vibrio Cholerae

Description: One purpose of this investigation is to determine the fatty acid and lipid content of typical Vibrio cholerae cells. The comparison of cholera lipid constituents with those of closely-related bacteria might be of taxonomic value. Furthermore, chemical characterization of the cholera vibrio could provide useful criteria for identification of these disease-producing microorganisms.
Date: August 1972
Creator: Brian, Buford Leo

Carbon Flux in Reservoir Sediments

Description: The central objective of the study was to fractionate sedimenting organic materials according to their source (allochthonous or autochthonous) and ultimately to determine the degree of biodegradability of contributions from either source with particular reference to activities at the mud-water interface.
Date: May 1973
Creator: Newton, Charles Eugene

Effects of a Methylcholanthrene-Induced Lymphosarcoma on Various Tissues of DBA/1J and Swiss White Mice

Description: This investigation was concerned with characterizing effects of this tumor line on lipid metabolism in DBA/lJ mice and serum protein levels and cellular changes in DBA/lJ and Swiss white mice. Total lipids, lipid phosphorus, neutral lipids, and changes in fatty acids were determined in liver, spleen, skin, and tumor of DBA/lJ mice bearing the lymphosarcoma at various days after injection of tumor cells.
Date: May 1973
Creator: Lindsey, Terri Jay

Biological Nitrogen Fixation in Two Southwestern Reservoirs

Description: This investigation has determined the presence of biological nitrogen fixation in two reservoirs in the southwestern United States: Lake Arlington and Lake Ray Hubbard. Subsequent tests have gathered baseline data on the effects of various biological, chemical, and physical parameters on in situ nitrogen fixation in these reservoirs. Of specific importance is the relationship between nitrogen fixation arid occasional blooms of blue-green algae which produce such problems as testes and odors in these water-supply impoundments.
Date: August 1973
Creator: Lawley, Gary G.

The Eosinophil and Lysophospholipase Responses in Mice Infected with Trichinella spiralis: A Role for the Lymphocyte and Macrophage

Description: The relationship among eosinophils, lysophospholipase activity and the immune response in animals infected with Trichinella spiralis was studied using in vivo and in vitro techniques. In an in vivo experiment, anti-thymocyte serum (ATS) was administered to mice infected with T. spiralis and its effects on intestinal lysophospholipase (EC 3.1.1.5.) activity, peripheral blood, bone marrow and intestinal eosinophilia were measured in the same experimental animal. The ATS caused a significant temporally related suppression of both the tissue lysophospholipase response and eosinophilia, in all three compartments. These findings support the hypothesis that parasite-induced eosinophilia is the cause of the increased lysophospholipase activity of parasitized tissue and that the responses are thymus cell-dependent. In vitro experiments demonstrated that the eosinophil was the primary inflammatory cell source of lysophospholipase among eosinophils, neutrophils macrophages and lymphocytes. The role of other cells and antigen in the production of the enzyme by the eosinophil was also investigated in vitro• Results demonstrated that eosinophils cultured with both T. spiralis antigen and other leukocytes yielded enzyme activities significantly greater than eosinophils cultured alone or with only antigen. More specific experiments showed that T-lymphocytes were the cells responsible for influencing the eosinophils' lysophospholipase activity in the presence of antigen, and that their influence was enhanced by the presence of macrophages. These results suggested that increased lysophospholipase activity present in parasitized tissue was not only due to increased numbers of eosinophils infiltrating parasitized tissue but was also due to each eosinophil synthesizing more of the enzyme. The necessity for antigen and other cells suggests a role for cell cooperation in the production of the enzyme, specifically T-lymphocytes and macrophage interaction with the eosinophil. A lymphocyte soluble factor collected from sensitized lymphocytes stimulated with specific antigen or concanavalin A was found to enhance the eosinophil lysophospholipase activity when added to cultures of ...
Date: August 1986
Creator: Adewusi, Iyabode Olukemi, 1958-

The Genetics of Pigmentation in Corynebacterium poinsettiae ATCC 9682

Description: Corynebacterium poinsettiae mutant strains blocked in carotenoid biosynthesis were obtained by treatment with the mutagen N-methyl-N1-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Additional carotenoid (Crt) mutant strains were obtained from a previous study conducted in our laboratory. Fifty-nine Crt mutants affected in carotenoid biosynthesis were examined by a normal phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system. Pigment extracts of Crt mutants and C. poinsettiae wild type strains were resolved by an isocratic system with hexane:acetone:dicholoromethane, 11.35:1.73:1.00 (by vol.) as the eluting solvent. In addition to the five major peaks, twelve minor peaks were observed in the wild type C. poinsettiae strain used in this study. Crt mutant and wild type strain peak heights were measured from the individual chromatograms and the peak height data set created was analyzed using the Statistical Analysis System program to perform a cluster analysis. The cluster analysis revealed five carotenoid mutant groups. Carotenoid pigments which accumulated or were absent in each of the cluster groups are reported. Cluster group 1 mutants (CrtA) are blocked in the dehydrogenase(s) which is(are) responsible for the dehydrogenations between phytoene and lycopene. Cluster group 2 mutants (CrtB) appear to be blocked at a second dehydrogenase specific for the dehydrogenation from C.p. 470 to C.p. 496. Cluster group 3 mutants (CrtC) are blocked at a cyclization step in the pathway which involves cyclization of C.p. 496 to C.p. 470 and which may cyclize C.p. 473 to C.p. 450. The genes CrtA and CrtB map only 0.5 map units from each other while CrtA and CrtC map 2.1 map units from one another. Mutants which accumulate end products but which lack certain precursors indicate a branched pathway for pigment biosynthesis exists in this organism. Media for the formation, fusion and regeneration of C. poinsettiae protoplasts are reported and a protocol for the use of these media in genetic ...
Date: August 1986
Creator: Campbell, Alan L. (Alan Lee)

Radial Compression High Performance Liquid Chromatography as a Tool for The Measurement of Endogenous Nucleotides in Bacteria

Description: High performance liquid chromatography was used to measure ribonucleoside triphosphates in microbial samples. Anion exchange columns in a radial compression module were used to separate and quantify purine and pyrimidine ribonucleotides. Endogenous ribonucleoside triphosphates were extracted from Escherichia coli and pseudomonas aeruginosa using three different solvents, namely trifluorocetic acid (TFA; 0.5M), trichloroacetic acid (TCA; 6 per cent w/v) and formic acid (1.0M) Extracts were assayed for uridine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), and guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) by using anion exchange radial compression high performance (pressure) liquid chromatography. The three extraction produres were compared for yield of triphosphates. E. coli, the TFA extraction procedure was more sensitive and reliable than TCA and formic acid extraction procedures, but , in P. aeruginosa, the best yields of ATP and GTP were obrained following extraction with TFA. Yields of UTP and CTP increased when extraction was performed in TCA. These data illustrate that different extraction produres produce different measures for different triphosphates, a point often overlooked.
Date: August 1986
Creator: Dutta, Probir Kumar

An Analysis of Respiratory Mechanisms Controlling Exercise Hyperpnea During Cycle Ergometry Conducted at Selected Workloads and Pedal Frequencies

Description: Respiratory and metabolic patterns in response to variations in exercise workload (WL) and pedal frequency (RPM) were examined in 10 healthy males. Each subject performed WLs of low (L), moderate (M) and high (H) intensity, equivalent to 25%, 50% and 75% V02 m a x at 7 pedal frequencies (40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 and 100 RPM). ANOVA ( 3 X 7 design) indicated that WL and RPM had independent and significant effects on all respiratory and metabolic measures; i.e., the greater the WL and RPM, the higher the HR, V02, VC02, Ve, Fb, Vt, Vt/Ti, Vt/Te and Ti/TtQt and the lower the Ti and Te. However, analysis of the interaction effect revealed different response patterns for Fb, Vt, Ti, Vt/Ti, Vt/Te and Ve among the WLs. During L-WL, increases in RPM produced increases in Ve which were due to progressive increases in both Fb and Vt. However, during M-WL and H-WL, increases in RPM produced increases in Ve which were accomplished by a constant Vt and a progressive increase in Fb. My findings suggest that during low WLs, the signal for Vt is dependent on rate of contraction, while during M-WL and H-WL, the signal for Vt appears to depend on force of contraction and is independent of increasing RPM. When comparing the L-WL and M-WL, alterations in Ve, Fb, Vt/Ti and Vt/Te in relation to increases in pedal frequency were additive. However, when these two lower WLs were compared to the H-WL, the interaction between pedal frequency and Ve, Fb, Vt/Ti and Vt/Te was multiplicative. In addition, the interaction between WL and RPM on Vt and Ti was additive when comparing the M-WL and H-WL and multiplicative when these two lower WLs were compared to the H-WL. Correlation analysis indicated that for all WLs, Te was more ...
Date: December 1986
Creator: Wise, Charles Hamilton

Fitness-Related Alterations in Blood Pressure Control: The Role of the Autonomic Nervous System

Description: Baroreflex function and cardiovascular responses to lower body negative pressure during selective autonomic blockade were evaluated in endurance exercise trained (ET) and untrained (UT) men. Baroreflex function was evaluated using a progressive intravenous infusion of phenylephrine HCL (PE) to a maximum of 0.12 mg/min. Heart rate, arterial blood pressure, cardiac output and forearm blood flow were measured at each infusion rate of PE. The reduction in forearm blood flow and concomitant rise in forearm vascular resistance was the same for each subject group. However, the heart rate decreases per unit increase of systolic or mean blood pressure were significantly (P<.05) less in the ET subjects (0.91 ± 0.30 versus 1.62 ± 0.28 for UT). During progressive lower body negative pressure with no drug intervention, the ET subjects had a significantly (P<.05) greater fall in systolic blood pressure (33.8 ± 4.8 torr versus 16.7 ± 3.9 torr). However, the change in forearm blood flow or resistance was not significantly different between groups. Blockade of parasympathetic receptors with atropine (0.04 mg/kg) eliminated the differences in response to lower body negative pressure. Blockade of cardiac sympathetic receptors with metoprolol (0.02 mg/kg) did not affect the differences observed during the control test. It was concluded that the ET subjects were less effective in regulating blood pressure than the UT subjects, because of 1) an attenuated baroreflex sensitivity, and 2) parasympathetic-mediated depression of cardiac and vasoconstrictive responses to the hypotensive stress.
Date: December 1986
Creator: Smith, Michael Lamar, 1957-

New Descriptions, Intraspecific Variation and Systematic Importance of Drumming Behavior in Selected North American Plecoptera

Description: Drumming behavior is described for the first time in 33 North American Plecoptera species, and signals of an additional five species, Pteronarcys pictetii, Acroneuria abnormis, Paragnetina media, Clioperla clio and Isogenoides zionensis, are further detailed. An out-group comparison of behavioral characters in all 104 world species whose drumming is known showed that the behavior is more advanced in the Arctoperlaria Group Systellognatha than in the Group Euholognatha. In general, tapping, monophasy, touching, sequenced exchange and less than 50 taps/answer are ancestral states, and rubbing, grouping, phasing, tremulation, interspersed exchange and equal or more than 50 taps/answer are derived states. There has been some co-evolution between abdominal structure and drumming behavior. Scanning Electron Micrographs of 30 species showed that the primitive state of tapping is ascociated with three classes of abdominal structure: (1) absence of derived structures, (2) lobes or vesicles, and (3) hammers. The derived behavior of rubbing, however, occurs only in species with derived structures, and is predominant in species having vesicles and hammers. Drumming can be used as a line of evidence to aid in defining genera and species, since the behavior has a variable degree of specificity or exclusiveness in all species, particularly in groups of species I have studied in the genera Isoperla, Pteronarcys and Taeniopteryx. Typical and variant computer-synthesized male calls of three stonefly species were tested with live females. They responded at high levels in such a way that the important informational content conveyed was identified as: (1) a minimal threshold of beat numbers, and (2) a discriminant window of beat intervals. Rub frequency and bibeat calling were critical informational parameters in two species.
Date: December 1986
Creator: Maketon, Monchan

Roles of Calcium Ions and Cyclic AMP in Olfactory Transduction

Description: The roles of Ca2 + and cAMP in olfactory transduction were explored using agents which affect calcium channels and second messenger systems. These agents were applied at certain calculated final concentrations onto olfactory epithelia of urethane-anesthetized frogs (Sana PiPlens) by two-sec aerosol spray. During extracellular recording, saturated vapors of isoamyl acetate were delivered every 100 sec in 0.3 sec pulses to produce an electroolfactogram (EOG). Inorganic cations that block inward calcium currents inhibit EOG responses with the following rank order: (La3+) > (Zn2+, Cd2+) > (Al3+, Ca2+, Sr2+) > (Co2+). Application of 7.5 mM La3+ eradicates £0G's, while Ba2+ (which can carry more current that Ca2+) initially produces significant enhancement (F=43.04, p<0.001, df=19). Magnesium ion has no effect on EOG's at 7.5 mM, while 1.5 X 10"4M Ca2+ is significantly inhibitory (F=5.74; p=0.0355; df=12). Control aerosol sprays of distilled water depress EOG's by an average of 5%. The organic calcium channel antagonists diltiazem and verapamil inhibit EOG's by 17% and 36X, respectively, at a concentration of 1.5 X 10~*M. Verapamil produces significant inhibition (F=17.17; p=0.002; df=ll) at 1.5 X 10" 5 M, while the 1,4-dihydropyridine calcium channel antagonists, nicardipine and nifedipine, do not inhibit beyond 1% DMSO controls. Several calmodulin antagonists decrease EOG's, but without correlation to their anti-calmodulin potency. Application of 1.5 X 10"*M chlorpromazine and N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-l-naphthalenesulfonamide inhibit EOG's by 31% and 27%, respectively, while trifluoperazine inhibits by 23%. Dibutyryl cAMP, a lipophilic mimic of cAMP, produces 54% inhibition at 1.5 X 10" *M. Dibutyryl cGMP, cGMP, cAMP, and adenosine all decrease EOG's by less than 15% compared to distilled water controls. Forskolin, a reversible activator of adenylate cyclase, inhibits EOG's by 57% at 1.5 X 10"5M, which is significant beyond the 1% DMSO controls (F=17.17; p=0.002; df=ll). These data support the hypothesis that Ca2+ participates in olfactory transduction. ...
Date: December 1986
Creator: Winegar, Bruce D. (Bruce David)

Interaction of Microwaves and Germinating Seeds

Description: This investigation was concerned with determining the interaction of microwaves with germinating seeds. This study covers two different approaches. The preliminary efforts covered the response of germinating seeds to treatment by microwaves and heat. The second phase of the investigation used microwaves as a probe to determine some of the processes of early seed germination. The preliminary investigation measured the internal metabolic process by ATP production. Leakage of ions and organic material from germinating seeds indicated that membranes are a target of microwaves and heat. Electron photo-micrographs showed an increase in damage to membranes as heat and microwave treatments were increased. The second phase of this investigation was concerned with determining some of the biological activity at the initiation of germination of wheat seeds, Triticum aestivum L., using a resonating microwave cavity oscillating at 9.3 GHz as a probe. Direct current conductivity measurements were also made on the seeds as a means of confirming the observations made with the microwave cavity. There was no observable difference between treatment by UHF or heat in the ultrastructure of germinating seeds. A dielectric response far above that of free water was found as live seeds of wheat began to imbibe water. This effect was assumed to be due to the release of ions, because conductivity increased as corresponding quantities of water were imbibed; and both conductivity and dielectric response decreased as imbibition progressed. Although dead seeds also imbibe water, they do not show this decrease in dielectric response. The dielectric response of live seeds was reduced after the initial imbibition, showing that water became tightly bound as imbibition progressed. The dielectric response of actively growing shoots from the seeds was much less than that of the seeds themselves. The large quantity of water in the shoots is assumed to be immobile, being tightly ...
Date: August 1987
Creator: Shafer, Floyd L. (Floyd Lorenz)

Neuropharmacological Characteristics of Tolerance for Cocaine Used as a Discriminative Stimulus

Description: The main purpose of this research was to investigate the phenomenon of tolerance to cocaine. Tolerance is operationally defined as a decreased drug effect due to prior history of drug administration. The animal model that was chosen to investigate tolerance to cocaine was the drug discrimination model, which is an animal analogue of human subjective drug effects. In the drug discrimination procedure, animals are trained to emit one behavior when injected with saline. In the present experiments, rats were trained to press one lever when injected with cocaine, 10 mg/kg, and a different lever when injected with saline for food reinforcement. Once rats are trained, they can accurately detect the cocaine stimulus greater than 95% of the time.
Date: August 1987
Creator: Wood, Douglas M. (Douglas Michael)

Life History Biology of the Desert Nesting Seagull Larus modestus

Description: Gray gulls Larus modestus are unique among birds of northern Chile as the only species nesting in the interior Atacama Desert, and the only seagull nesting far (30 - 100 km) from surface water. During breeding-nesting (August - February) gray gulls congregate on the coast of northern Chile where they feed and initiate courtship. As early as August, breeding pairs commute daily to the inner desert to establish nesting territories, round-trip distances of 60-200 Km. During incubation (30 days) and brooding (7 days) adults alternate daily foraging flights to the coast. Afterwards, both adults forage daily for their chick(s) until fledging (ca. 60 days). Foraging flights and thermoregulatory costs during the period of maximal solar radiation, when ground temperatures may reach 61 C in the day and drop to 2 C at night, have selected for adaptations which minimize those costs: tolerance of hypothermia and hyperthermia; dark plumage; low egg-shell water vapor conductance; low standard metabolic rate; elaborate repertory of thermoregulatory behavior which allow adults to take advantage of microclimatic variations in the desert and minimize costs relative to a sympatric congenor, Larus belcheri scheduling foraging flights to take advantage of optimal atmospheric conditions and presence of forage fish (anchovies) close to the surface; scheduling migration to coincide with anchovy production and levels of interspecific competition; and reduced clutch size ( ≤ 2) relative to most seagulls. Periodic El Nino-Southern Oscillations (ENSO), which reduce principal food items of gray gulls, have selected for 'bet hedging" tactic by which L. modestus either ceases reproduction or varies clutch size between one and two, as observed during and after the 1982-83 ENSO. During a typical reproductive season, breeding pairs allocate a minimum of 39 percent of their net metabolized energy (NME) to foraging flights. Including energy content of eggs, females have an overall ...
Date: December 1987
Creator: Guerra Correa, Carlos Guillermo

Physiological Responses of Myriophyllum spicatum to Time Varying Exposures of Diquat, 2,4-D and Copper

Description: The physiological responses of Myriophyllum spicatum to 2,4-D, diquat and copper were quantified using a plant tissue viability assay, and daily measures of dissolved oxygen and pH. Correlations of herbicide tissue residues to physiological response measures were determined and the relationship was used to develop exposure-response models. Diquat and copper had a greater effect on plant tissue viability than was observed for 2,4-D. Diquat produced greater reductions in dissolved oxygen concentrations and pH values than 2,4-D or copper. Copper exposure had the least effect on these parameters. Exposure-response models developed for 2,4-D predicted effective control at plant tissue residues ranging from 4000 to 4700 mg/kg. Aqueous exposure concentrations necessary to produce effective control plant tissue residues ranged from 0.20 to 0.40 mg/L. Exposure-response models developed for diquat predicted effective control at plant tissue residues ranging from 225 to 280 mg/kg. Aqueous exposure concentrations necessary to produce effective control plant tissue residues ranged from 0.113 to 0.169 mg/L. Exposure-response models developed for copper predicted effective control at plant tissue residues ranging from 680 to 790 mg/kg. Aqueous exposure concentrations necessary to produce effective control plant tissue residues ranged from 0.32 to 0.64 mg/L. Model predictions for 2,4-D, diquat and copper were within 0.5 mg/L of the manufacturers' label recommendations for these herbicides. The use of laboratory microcosms in development of exposure-response models for diquat and copper produced results comparable to those using the larger-scale greenhouse systems. Diquat effectively controlled M. spicatum at lower tissue residues than 2,4-D or copper. In addition, initial aqueous exposure concentrations were also lower for diquat. Use of these models in field situations should be coupled with considerations of quantity of biomass present and environmental conditions, such as turbidity, in order to accurately calculate exposure concentrations necessary for effective tissue residues. Thus, the use of these models ...
Date: May 1988
Creator: Rocchio, Patricia Mary

Pre-Impoundment Estimations of Nutrient Loading to Ray Roberts Lake and Prediction of Post-Inundation Trophic Status

Description: Excessive nutrient loading of natural and artificial lakes has led, in some systems, to plethoric algal and aquatic macrophyte growth which can result in aesthetic degradation and undesirable tastes and odors. It would be advantageous to have some indication of the potential trophic status of a reservoir before it is filled. An objective of this study was to assess the water quality and nutrient loading potential of the tributaries entering Ray Roberts Lake, a large reservoir located in north central Texas. Samples from a maximum of thirteen sites were collected on the Elm Fork, Trinity River, Isle duBois Creek, and five additional tributaries. Data were also collected during six storms, from atmospheric deposition collectors, and from soil-water microcosms. The relationship between watershed landuse and mean water nutrient concentrations was evaluated. Significant differences will exist between the two major arms of Ray Roberts Lake: Elm Fork, Trinity River and Isle duBois Creek. While the majority of the annual phosphorus and nitrogen load entering both tributaries is coming from overland flow, the proportion is higher in Isle duBois Creek. Point sources in the Elm Fork contribute a larger percentage of the bioavailable phosphorus, which is significantly greater than in Isle duBois Creek. The water quality of Isle duBois Creek, especially nitrogen, is affected to a greater degree by the landuses in its watershed. Predictive regression models made accurate estimations of stream nutrient concentrations in Isle duBois Creek. The entire reservoir, upon reaching equilibrium conditions, will be classified as a eutrophic lake. The Trinity arm, with a higher phosphorus load, will display a higher trophic status. The Isle duBois arm has a lower phosphorus load which will give it a lower trophic status. The long hydraulic residence time of the two arms of the reservoir will remove nutrients upstream of the main body, ...
Date: May 1988
Creator: Pillard, David Alan, 1958-