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Digital Medical Humanities: An Applied Media Studies Community of Practice

Description: Presentation for the 2016 Digital Frontiers Annual Conference. In this presentation, Kirsten Ostherr draws on examples from the Medical Media Arts Lab to show how digital medical humanities cultivates 21st century communication skills for future health professionals.
Date: September 22, 2016
Creator: Ostherr, Kirsten
Item Type: Video

Grateful Data: Digital Humanities, Data Cleaning, and the Grateful Dead

Description: Presentation for the 2016 Digital Frontiers Annual Conference. In this presentation, Scott Carlson discusses his efforts to teach data cleaning techniques using publicly available data related to the Grateful Dead, including data from the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers, the Internet Archive, and the Internet Movie Database.
Date: September 22, 2016
Creator: Carlson, Scott
Item Type: Video

imagineRio: A Diachronic Atlas of the Social and Architectural Evolution of Rio de Janeiro

Description: Presentation for the 2016 Digital Frontiers Annual Conference. In this presentation, Farès el-Dahdah and Alida C. Metcalf discuss imagineRio, a searchable atlas platform that illustrates the social and urban evolution of Rio de Janeiro over the entire history of the city, as it existed and as it was often imagined.
Date: September 22, 2016
Creator: el-Dahdah, Farès & Metcalf, Alida C.
Item Type: Video

Keynote Address: Burning Down the Tent: New Futures for Social Justice and Digital Humanities

Description: Video recording of a keynote presentation at the 2016 Digital Frontiers Annual Conference. In this keynote address, Roopika Risam uses digital initiatives at Salem State University as a case study to illustrate the key practices necessary for building digital humanities communities and institutional centers that place social justice at the core of their missions.
Date: September 22, 2016
Creator: Risam, Roopika
Item Type: Video

Of Institutions, Initiatives, and the Importance of Regional Academic Communities: Building NYCDH

Description: Video recording of a presentation at the 2016 Digital Frontiers Annual Conference. In this presentation, Kimon Keramidas and Alex Gil discuss how the New York City Digital Humanities group enables a wide variety of communities of practice, and the importance of regional communities in facilitating the growth of new academic fields, such as digital humanities.
Date: September 22, 2016
Creator: Keramidas, Kimon & Gil, Alex
Item Type: Video

Quantifying Artist Canvas with Digital Signal Processing Tools

Description: Video recording of a presentation at the 2016 Digital Frontiers Annual Conference. In this presentation, Don Johnson describes and illustrates signal processing techniques used in technical examinations for art authentication, and demonstrates how these results are used in technical art history.
Date: September 22, 2016
Creator: Johnson, Don
Item Type: Video

Recital Preservation: Before They Fade Away

Description: Presentation for the 2016 Digital Frontiers Annual Conference. In this presentation, Dara Flinn discusses issues in planning and executing a preservation project with Fondren Library and the Shepherd School of Music for digitizing audio materials.
Date: September 22, 2016
Creator: Flinn, Dara
Item Type: Video

Welcome Address

Description: Welcome address for the 2016 Digital Frontiers Annual Conference by the Conference Director, Spencer Keralis, and Host Welcome Addresses from Rice University by Vice Provost Sara Lowman and the Humanities Research Center Director, Farès el-Dahdah.
Date: September 22, 2016
Creator: Keralis, Spencer D. C.; Lowman, Sara & el-Dahdah, Farès
Item Type: Video

Workshop: Digital Literacy in the College

Description: Video recording of a workshop presentation at the 2016 Digital Frontiers Annual Conference. In this workshop, Ron Thomas demonstrates an active-learning exercise wherein students create a presentation using an allusion-plus-image format in order to gloss allusions form the writer's text with images from the web.
Date: September 22, 2016
Creator: Thomas, Ron
Item Type: Video

Yes, but is it Linked Open Data?

Description: Poster presented at Digital Frontiers. This poster presents preliminary results from an analysis of 407 success proposals to the National Endowment for the Humanities' Office of Digital Humanities grant program.
Date: September 22, 2016
Creator: Keralis, Spencer D. C.; Grumbach, Elizabeth & Potvin, Sarah
Item Type: Poster

Critical Digital Pedagogy Kick Off Meeting

Description: This presentation provides an overview of the Critical Digital Pedagogy Faculty Mentoring Network Grant project, including activities, goals, and projected outcomes.
Date: September 9, 2016
Creator: Keralis, Spencer D. C.
Item Type: Presentation

Getting started with IIIF

Description: This handout accompanies the presentation "Enabling Scholarly Annotation Using Open Frameworks for the Web" given as part of a panel at El'Manuscript-2016. This handout describes the International Image Interoperability Framework and provides links to resources.
Date: August 20, 2016
Creator: Judkins, Julie & Hawkins, Kevin S.
Item Type: Pamphlet

Achieving Financial Sustainability: Are We Asking the Wrong Questions?

Description: While technology has made producing copies of digital content almost entirely free, there is no escaping that publishing, according to most definitions of the term, still requires time and money. Any publishing service offered by a library must find a way to achieve financial sustainability—that is, operate without losing money. However, even "losing money" is a tricky concept, especially when taking into account varying definitions of operating expenses (overhead costs) under different models for auxiliary services. Libraries are by their very nature cost centers, providing services without the expectation of recovering revenue, and are usually part of larger organizations that similarly provide services under partial or full subsidies. While libraries are often comfortable with charging for convenience services and for services to those outside their designed community of users, careful thought should be given to which costs a publishing service-or any new service-should be expected to recover.
Date: August 12, 2016
Creator: Hawkins, Kevin S.
Item Type: Presentation

2D and 3D Fabrication Devices: Can They Improve Spatial Reasoning Skills in Children?

Description: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential benefit of two hours of activities involving 2D and 3D fabricators on the spatial reasoning skills of children in Grades 4 and 5, ages 9 to 10, from a private school in Southeast Texas. Can the introduction to hands-on activities with products created with these devices and learning about how these devices operate improve spatial reasoning skills? The research also evaluates the use of the Shapes Test as a valid measure of the spatial reasoning skills of children. The Cube Design and Spatial Memory subtests of the UNIT (Universal Nonverbal Intelligence Tests) were used for evaluating the spatial reasoning skills of the participants, based on their respected validity, along with a Shapes Test that is in development. Discussion regarding gender, language, and experiential theories of spatial reasoning skill development are included in the literature review.
Date: August 2016
Creator: Zimmerman, Ellen L

Accuracy of Partner Perception and Relationship Satisfaction: Investigating Masturbatory Habits

Description: An individual's perceptions of various aspects of one's romantic relationship (irrespective of whether or not the perceptions align with reality) often play a critical role in romantic relationship satisfaction. Research has demonstrated that the accuracy of an individual's perception of his or her partner is generally positively related to the individual's romantic relationship satisfaction. However, when perceiving negative or conflictual messages from a partner, an individual's accuracy of perception is negatively associated with his or her romantic relationship satisfaction. Researchers have suggested that poor accuracy in perceiving negative messages might diffuse the negative intention in a way that is less impactful to the relationship. The present study was designed to investigate accuracy in the perception of sexual topics, specifically masturbatory habits. A sample of 93 married couples (186 individuals) responded to questions about (a) their own masturbatory behaviors and (b) their perception of their partners' masturbatory behaviors to determine the accuracy of each partner's perception of his or her partner. The association between accuracy and romantic and sexual relationship satisfaction was explored, along with one potential moderating variable: attitudes toward masturbation. Perceived reason for masturbating, perceived target of arousal during masturbation, and partner's actual reason for masturbating all positively predicted an individual's relationship satisfaction. Partner's actual openness about masturbatory behaviors moderated the association between accuracy of partner perception of openness about masturbation and both relationship and sexual satisfaction. When partners were more open about masturbation, accuracy was a stronger positive predictor of relationship and sexual satisfaction than when partners were less open about masturbation. Results, limitations, areas for future research, and clinical implications are discussed.
Date: August 2016
Creator: Ramos, Marciana Julia