UNT Theses and Dissertations - 9 Matching Results

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Dostoyevsky's View of the Role of Suffering in Human Existence

Description: In order to establish the views on suffering held by the nineteenth-century (1821-1881) Russian novelist Fyodor Dostoyevsky, it is first necessary to determine the viewpoint of his age. In general, it was an age of humanitarianism-- the age of "compassion for the suffering of human beings," the age of optimism, of faith in a morality established by science and reason." Humanitarianism itself was an outgrowth of the Age of Enlightenment, the eighteenth-century intellectual movement which emphasized reason. This age of reason reflected the progress in science, which had weakened the hold of the Church and of faith on men's minds. Dostoyevsky's rejection of socialism made it necessary for him to reject the corollary of socialism: the elimination of human suffering. Thus he was forced to evolve a personal interpretation for the suffering that he would not let be abolished. Critics generally consider Siberia to be the turning point in Dostoyevsky's life, both from a personal and a literary standpoint. Before his imprisonment, Dostoyevskyts values were too immature for him to develop a significant theory illuminating the problem of suffering. It took Siberia to teach Dostoyevsky the meaning of metaphysical suffering-- the search for the meaning of God and reality. This meaning can be traced in the majority of his post-Siberian works in the form of the theory that happiness and ultimate salvation are made available to man through the purifying effects of his metaphysical sufferings.
Date: August 1963
Creator: McMurtry, Helen L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Lord Byron's Interest in British Politics

Description: The purpose of this thesis is to examine the politics of Byron as they are related to his age. Necessarily, a part of this work will deal with ideas that are somewhat conjectural, largely because of the limitations of time and space as well as the lack of accurate information--particularly that which concerns Byron and the Whig circle.
Date: August 1963
Creator: Krukowski, John D.
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Naturalistic Technique of John O'Hara

Description: The thesis of this paper on John O'Hara is that certain of his novels contain sufficient characteristics of literary naturalism to reward a study of them from that perspective. In part, the purpose of this paper is to illustrate O'Hara's merits and, hopefully, to enhance his reputation as a writer of literary worth by viewing his novels from the proper perspective.
Date: August 1963
Creator: Krause, Donald Paul
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Relationship between the Hunter and the Hunted: Moby Dick, The Old Man and the Sea, and The Bear

Description: The purpose of this thesis is to point out explicitly the rather startling fact that each of these three writers in a novel which is representative of his own art and world view had developed the hunt-quest theme in a pattern and manner which are almost identical.
Date: August 1963
Creator: Egner, Ruth Ann
Partner: UNT Libraries

Eve, the Apple, and Eugene O'Neill: the Development of O'Neill's Concept of Women

Description: It is the purpose of this paper to outline the development of O'Neill's characterization of women from the loving, submissive Mother in the early plays to the Mother turned Destroyer in the later plays. This is accomplished through a chronological examination of the women characters in eight of O'Neill's major plays--Beyond the Horizon, The Staw, Anna Christie, Welded, Desire Under the Elms, The Great God Brown, Strange Interlude, and Mourning Becomes Electra.
Date: June 1963
Creator: Mazaher, Kay H.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Medievalism in Shakespeare

Description: This study will undertake to point out only a few of the many medieval elements used by Shakespeare. It does not purport to do more than to examine briefly a small number of the myriad medieval traits to be found in Shakespeare's writing nor to cite more than a few examples of these traits in a limited number of his plays.
Date: June 1963
Creator: Silverthorne, Elizabeth Emily
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Conscience of Macbeth

Description: Whatever are the other merits of Macbeth, it must be classed as one of the most penetrating studies of conscience in literature. Shakespeare does not attempt to describe in the drama how the ordinary criminal would react to evil, but how Shakespeare himself would have felt if he had fallen into crime. 1 The ramifications of this conflict between the conscience of a man of genius and the supernatural forces of wickedness, therefore, assume immense dimensions. "Macbeth leaves on most readers a profound impression of the misery of a guilty conscience and the retribution of crime . . . But what Shakespeare perhaps felt even more deeply, when he wrote this play, was the incalculability of evil--that in meddling with it human beings do they know not what."2 This drama displays an evil not to be accounted for simply in terms of the protagonist's will or his causal relationships to evil. It is an agency which is beyond the power of Macbeth's will; and his conscience, as powerful and imaginative as it is, can only warn him that he is involving himself in a force which will cause him unexpected and hideous mental pain. If there is a moral in Macbeth, it is obviously that men should not tamper with evil, for not even a deep-rooted conscience and an ascendant will can contend with its influence.
Date: May 1963
Creator: Edwards, James A.
Partner: UNT Libraries