UNT Theses and Dissertations - 17 Matching Results

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The Characteristics of Psychological Safety in Group Counseling

Description: Psychological safety is a concept mentioned throughout the literature as a necessary component in the process of change in group counseling. Despite its frequent mention, no study has examined the characteristics of psychological safety. The purpose of this study was to lay the groundwork for a definition of the concept of psychological safety using self reports of group leaders and group members on a constructed Likert format psychological safety questionnaire of three attributional categories: self, other members, and leader. The study utilized group members (n = 44) and group leaders (n = 4) participating in laboratory groups as a part of a counseling related masters curriculum. The questionnaires were filled out on the first, eighth (middle), and fourteenth (last) sessions. Hierarchies for characteristics and attribution were constructed by using a summing procedure of the Likert responses. Results on the attribution of psychological safety by group members showed a consistent pattern over the three time measures. Group members reported leaders as the most attributed to facilitating psychological safety, other members as second, and self as least attributed to facilitate psychological safety. Group leaders showed no apparent agreement between groups, but each group leader attributed psychological safety consistently over time within one's own group. Results on the characteristics of psychological safety yielded a comprehensive list of characteristics, arranged in hierarchical format, as reported by both group members and leaders. Results indicated that psychological safety has some core concepts in each of the attributional categories. For group members, the characteristics of "warmth and support" and "active listening" were stable across every attributional category and time measure. For group leaders, "self disclosing feelings", "warmth and support", and "responding in an emotional, feeling manner" were reported in every time measure and attributional category. Characteristics that had a negative effect on psychological safety and recommendations for ...
Date: May 1997
Creator: Fall, Kevin A.
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Comparison of Academic Stress Experienced by Students at an Urban Community College and an Urban University

Description: The present study compared the academic stress levels of 450 college sophomore students at a public university and a public two-year college. This investigation also explored the levels of academic stress by institutional type, age, gender, and ethnicity. Data were obtained from having the subjects complete the Academic Stress Scale, a questionnaire which lists thirty five stress items found in the college classroom. Analysis of variance and t-tests were used to analyze the data. There were 225 subjects each in the community college group and the university group. The university group had a statistically significant higher mean stress score than the community college group. 294 traditional age (23 and younger) and 156 nontraditional age (24 and over) subjects stress levels were compared. It was found that the traditional age college student group experienced a statistically significant higher academic stress level in both academic settings. Group means were compared between the stress scores of 245 female and 205 male subjects. At both the community college and university levels, the female group had a statistically significant higher level of academic stress. The academic stress levels were also compared according to ethnicity. The minority group consisted of 104 subjects and 346 subjects comprised the non-minority group. At the community college, the minority group had a statistically significant higher level of academic stress. However, at the university level, there was no statistically significant difference by ethnicity. Examinations, final grades, term papers, homework, and studying for examinations were ranked as being stressful by the largest percentage of all the subjects. It was found in this study that levels of academic stress differ significantly by institutional type, age, gender, and ethnicity. Implications for college students, instructors, and administrators , based on this study's conclusions, are offered.
Date: May 1997
Creator: Benson, Larry G. (Larry Glen)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Filial Therapy with Immigrant Chinese Parents in Canada

Description: This study was designed to determine the effectiveness of filial therapy training in: (a) increasing immigrant Chinese parents' empathic behavior with their children; (b) increasing immigrant Chinese parents' acceptance level toward their children; (c) reducing immigrant Chinese parents' stress related to parenting; (d) reducing immigrant Chinese parents' perceived number of problem behaviors in their children; and (e) enhancing the self concept of the Chinese children of immigrant Chinese parents.
Date: May 1997
Creator: Yuen, Tommy Chi-man
Partner: UNT Libraries

Litigation Subsequent to a Mandated Psycho-Educational Seminar for Divorcing Parents

Description: This study was designed to assess the difference in litigation between two courts: one mandating For Kids' Sake, a psycho-educational seminar for divorcing parents, and the other not so mandating. The level of difficulty of children's adjustment to divorce has been positively correlated with parental hostility. More hostile parents would have more contested cases, interim motions, and relitigations. This research compared final dispositions, interim motions, and relitigation between parents in two courts in Collin County, Texas. The treatment group was from the 219th District Court which mandated all divorcing parents with minor children to attend the For Kids' Sake Seminar and the control group was from the 199th District Court which did not so mandate. Archival data was collected from a computer generated list for the Total group data to assess final dispositions and directly from District Clerk files for the In-Depth group data to assess interim motions and relitigation. The Total group was comprised of 679 research subjects with 330 cases in the treatment group and 349 cases in the control group. The In-Depth group consisted of 182 cases from both courts with 84 cases in the treatment group and 98 cases in the control group. Chi square analysis of the total group revealed significantly more parents in the treatment group who non suited the divorce suit and remained married (p. < .05), a significantly lower number of cases in the treatment group with interim motions (p. < .10), and a significantly lower amount of relitigation in the treatment group (p. < .05). The results showed that the court that mandated For Kids' Sake evidenced a reduction in subsequent litigation which not only benefits the legal system but also hopefully reflects lower parental hostility and higher parental cooperation, thereby benefiting the children of divorce.
Date: May 1997
Creator: Buckner, Brenda Sullivan
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Structural Approach to Four Theories of Group Development

Description: The goal of this study was to attempt to develop a classification scheme that systematically related individual behavior, interpersonal behavior, and group interactions for the purpose of using the resulting classification scheme to evaluate theories of group development proposed by Bion, Bennis and Shepard, Bales, and Tuckman and Jensen. It was assumed that theorists' presuppositions about the structure of groups might influence their theories. Using a qualitative process of analysis, a structural classification scheme (SCS) was developed based upon transformative and generative rules, utilizing the General System Theory subsystem process of self-regulated boundary operations. The SCS protocol was employed to categorize and compare the theories of group development proposed by Bion, Bennis and Shepard, Bales, and Tuckman and Jensen. The resulting categorization of theories indicated that relationships existed among and between a group's structural properties, the complexity and type of communication connections among and between group members, and the size of the group. In addition, a common structural relationship was demonstrated to exist among and between individual, dyadic, and triadic group forms. A similar structural relationship was also speculated to exist between groups of any size. It was concluded that a structural approach to groups may offer insight to group leaders and members in recognizing and creating alternative frameworks that best fit a group's structure to its task. This approach may have broad implications in that it suggests that group goals might best be considered before the structure of the group is determined. In addition, a structural approach was also speculated to be an emotionally neutral alternative method of discussing individual and group behavior.
Date: May 1997
Creator: King, Dennis J., 1945-
Partner: UNT Libraries

Student Perceptions of Achievement Resulting From Informal Student-Faculty Relations at Liaoning Normal College of Foreign Language. Liaoyang, People's Republic of China

Description: Chinese college students' 1993 perceptions of gains in achievement as a result of informal student-faculty relations outside the classroom were investigated at Liaoning Normal College of Foreign Language in Liaoyang, China. This study included assessment of pre-enrollment demographics and analyzed perceived gains due to student-faculty informal contact in the areas of academic achievement, intellectual achievement, and personal development.
Date: May 1997
Creator: Morris, A. J., 1941-
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Study of the Influence of Kenneth Cooper's Work on the Teaching of Wellness and Fitness in Physical Education Programs in 2-Year Community Colleges in the United States

Description: Kenneth H. Cooper is considered to be a noted scholar in the field of wellness and fitness. This study explored his contributions to the preventive medicine and wellness movement in community college physical education programs in the United States. It examined Cooper's influence on the development of preventive medicine and wellness from its inception and growth to its impact on changes and factors affecting curriculum in community college programs. A random sample of436 physical education division directors from the nation's 1,400 community colleges yielded a 62% survey response. For purposes of comparison, the sample was stratified into two regions taken fromeast and west of the Mississippi River. Chi-square analysis at the .01 level of significance found no difference between variables due to geographic region. The findings of this study indicate that Kenneth Cooper's contributions to preventive medicine and wellness in community college physical education curriculum are overshadowed by state and local governing bodies that are the force behind curricular development in the nation's 2-year community colleges. However, as an individual contributor, Cooper ranks highly in influencing the wellness and physical education curriculum primarily in the areas of aerobic exercise, physical fitness, and cardiovascular disease. The extent of Cooper's impact on community college physical education programs is recognized by the wide utilization of the 1.5 mile run test and 12-minute run test developed by Cooper. Two areas of Cooper's research—antioxidants and spiritual fitness—are not priorities in physical education programming. Changes in physical education programs in the past 10 years show an increased emphasis and popularity in aerobic fitness courses. It was also found that 40% of the community colleges responding to the present study indicated no physical education programming and that credit hours for physical education are decreasing.
Date: May 1997
Creator: Coan, Barbara A. (Barbara Ann)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Development of a Database Guide for Institutional Research in a Theological Seminary

Description: This study sought to create a guideline to assist theological seminaries build a longitudinal database for institutional research. The study used the National Center for Higher Education Management (NCHEMS) data element dictionary as the base document for the study.
Date: June 1997
Creator: Bratton, Terry L. (Terry Lee)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Comparison of College Student Leadership Programs from the 1970s to the 1990s

Description: The primary concerns of this study were to describe the most common practices of current college student leadership training programs in the United States and to compare the 1979 and 1997 findings by replicating the 1979 Simonds study. This study provides an overview of related literature on the history of leadership theory and the research on leadership training in higher education, a detailed description of the methodology, results of the survey, a comparative analysis of the 1979 and 1997 findings, and discussion of the current status of leadership training at institutions of higher education. Conclusions are drawn, and implications and recommendations for student affairs professionals are made that may improve the quality of student leadership in higher education.
Date: August 1997
Creator: McMillon, Keri Leigh Rogers
Partner: UNT Libraries

Filial Therapy with Parents of Children Experiencing Learning Difficulties

Description: This study was designed to determine the effectiveness of the Landreth 10-week filial therapy model as an intervention for the parents of children experiencing learning difficulties.The purpose of this study was to determine if filial therapy is effective in: 1) increasing parental acceptance of children with a learning difficulty; 2) reducing the stress level of parents of children with learning difficulties; 3) decreasing social problems and total behavior problems of children with learning difficulties as reported by parents and teachers.
Date: August 1997
Creator: Kale, Amy L. (Amy Louise)
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Impact of a Mentoring Program on the Self-Esteem of College-Age Women

Description: The fact that girls and women suffer a loss of self-esteem disproportionate to boys and men is without argument. There are an increasing number of books, magazine articles, and resource kits being made available to begin to comprehensively address the issue with young girls. However, less effort is being directed toward the older adolescent, the college-age woman. The problem with which this study was concerned was that of determining the impact of a mentoring program on the self-esteem of college-age women. The Multidimensional Self-Esteem Inventory (MSEI) was administered as a pre- and posttest, to 40 sophomore women, 20 of whom were in a control group and 20 who participated in the structured mentoring program. Using the MSEI, it was possible to gain statistically significant data which indicated that the self-esteem of the women could be positively impacted as a result of the mentoring experience. In addition to the instrument, the participants kept journals about their mentoring experience. Therefore, this research was able to report both qualitative and quantitative findings. The findings regarding the control group were not statistically significant for any of the 11 characteristics on the inventory. The findings from the mentored group however, were determined to be statistically significant for 5 characteristics: global self-esteem, competence, lovability, body appearance, and identity integration. From the statistical findings, as well as, from the journal entries it appeared that mentoring is a valuable experience. Also it was determined that there was a pattern to a positive mentoring experience. The women felt that their mentors were individuals in whom they could place their trust, the women felt the mentors could be helpful to them because of the wisdom that comes from life experience.
Date: August 1997
Creator: Higgins, Lynda Kay Burton
Partner: UNT Libraries

Node-Link Mapping and Rational Recovery: Enhancing the Recovery Process

Description: Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) continues to be the most accepted approach for the treatment of addictions in the United States. However, due to recent evidence questioning the effectiveness of AA, the need for alternative approaches to the treatment of addictions has become clear. The following research addresses the efficacy of one such alternative, Rational Recovery (RR). Node-Link Mapping (NLM), a graphic communication technique which uses links and nodes as building blocs to facilitate and enhance communication of information as well as awareness in a counseling environment, was implemented to enhance the recovery process. Three groups of ten (10), chemically dependent, adjudicated subjects were exposed to three different treatment approaches at an outpatient counseling center. The Experimental group received RR with NLM, the Comparison group was exposed only to RR, and the Control group continued in treatment according to the protocol of the counseling agency. All subjects were given the Substance Abuse Subtle Screening Inventory-2 (SASSI-2) as a measurement of symptoms associated with chemical dependency. The subjects were also administered the Rotter Internal-External Locus of Control Scale (Rotter I-E Scale) to determine locus of control prior to treatment and any change after treatment.
Date: August 1997
Creator: Schmidt, Eric A. (Eric Alexander)
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Relationship between Work-Family Role Strain and Parenting Styles in Mothers of Young Children

Description: The relationship between work-family role strain and parenting styles (permissive, authoritarian, and authoritative) was examined. Questionnaires were completed by 45 mothers whose children (ages newborn to three years) were enrolled in early childhood centers in the Dallas-Fort Worth-Denton, Texas, area. Participants were primarily Caucasian, high-income mothers who had attended college. Results indicated no significant relationship between role strain and parenting styles. Open-ended questions revealed insights into mothers' reported role strain. This research may provide employers and professionals who work with families with information to assist mothers in reducing role strain. They may also recognize that parenting style may be independent of a successful balance of work and family.
Date: August 1997
Creator: Lucas, Kimber Ghormley
Partner: UNT Libraries

Self-Efficacy and Selected Variables as Predictors of Persistence for First Quarter Students at a Proprietary Institution

Description: Proprietary colleges are uniquely different from two or four year colleges due to the emphasis on the student establishing a definite career path prior to enrollment. Because of this career track emphasis, Bandura's (1977) postulation that self-efficacy is a significant variable influencing task completion may offer insight into the challenge of student retention at a proprietary college. The study's purpose was to determine if career self-efficacy, demographic factors, and academic preparedness measures in first quarter students could predict student persistence, class attendance, and academic performance. The statistical technique of multinomial logistic regression was applied to data files of 725 first quarter students who attended The Art Institute of Dallas from Summer 1996 through Winter 1997. The predictor variables included a measure of career self-efficacy, ASSET scores (American College Testing Program, 1994), ethnicity, age, gender, full-time/part-time attendance, high school grade point average, parents' educational level, socioeconomic status, and developmental course placement. Criterion variables were completion, class attendance, and cumulative grade point average.
Date: August 1997
Creator: Baughman, Leslie C. (Leslie Claire)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Social Integration Among Undergraduate Students With Physical Disabilities

Description: The study's purposes were to understand how students with physical disabilities perceive a) normative pressures identified in Weidman's (1989) Model of Undergraduate Socialization as affecting their social integration; b) their own disability as influencing their social integration; and c) their levels of satisfaction with social integration.
Date: August 1997
Creator: Hodges, Janet S.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Using the Stanislavski System to Teach Non-Realistic Acting

Description: This study examined Stanislavski's system as it was explained in his three books, An Actor Prepares, Building A Character, and Creating A Character. The study then examined the applicability of the Stanislavski System to the theaters of Bertolt Brecht and Absurdist theatre as represented by Harold Pinter and Samuel Beckett.
Date: August 1997
Creator: Lee, Edward D. (Edward Dale)
Partner: UNT Libraries