UNT Theses and Dissertations - 19,292 Matching Results

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An Exploration of Elementary L2 Learners' Use of Metacognitive Strategies

Description: This multiple case study examined the experiences of elementary L2 learners who received instruction in either reciprocal teaching or the think aloud strategy (TAS), and identified patterns of use that emerged from participants' employment of the strategies. The three L2 participants took a pre- test and a posttest, were recorded using the strategies, and responded to interview questions about the strategies. Using qualitative data analysis techniques, four themes emerged from analysis of the data, including; talking like a teacher, I know what I know, established strategies, and declines to use the steps in the strategy. Implications from these findings suggest that the discussion facilitated by reciprocal teaching assists elementary L2 participants in better understanding the text and also supports their language acquisition, whereas TAS does not facilitate discussion. Further, even though reciprocal teaching promotes discussion, teacher assistance during discussion is necessary. Finally, it is essential that teachers are mindful of students' understandings of topics and the difficulty of texts used when students are learning the strategies.
Date: December 2018
Creator: McNeel, Michele E.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Exploring Growth Kinematics and Tuning Optical and Electrical Properties of Indium Antimonide Nanowires

Description: This dissertation work is a study of the growth kinematics, synthesis strategies and intrinsic properties of InSb nanowires (NWs). The highlights of this work include a study of the effect of the growth parameters on the composition and crystallinity of NWs. A change in the temperature ramp-up rate as the substrate was heated to reach the NW growth temperature resulted in NWs that were either crystalline or amorphous. The as-grown NWs were found to have very different optical and electrical properties. The growth mechanism for crystalline NWs is the standard vapor-liquid-solid growth mechanism. This work proposes two possible growth mechanisms for amorphous NWs. The amorphous InSb NWs were found to be very sensitive to laser radiation and to heat treatment. Raman spectroscopy measurements on these NWs showed that intense laser light induced localized crystallization, most likely due to radiation induced annealing of defects in the region hit by the laser beam. Electron transport measurements revealed non-linear current-voltage characteristics that could not be explained by a Schottky diode behavior. Analysis of the experimental data showed that electrical conduction in this material is governed by space charge limited current (SCLC) in the high bias-field region and by Ohm's law in the low bias region. Temperature dependent conductivity measurements on these NWs revealed that conduction follows Mott variable range hopping mechanism at low temperatures and near neighbor hopping mechanism at high temperature. Low-temperature annealing of the amorphous NWs in an inert environment was found to induce a phase transformation of the NWs, causing their crystallinity to be enhanced. This thesis also proposes a new and low-cost strategy to grow p-type InSb NWs on InSb films grown on glass substrate. The high quality polycrystalline InSb film was used as the host on which the NWs were grown. The NWs with an average diameter of ...
Date: December 2018
Creator: Algarni, Zaina Sluman
Partner: UNT Libraries

William's America: Royal Perspective and Centralization of the English Atlantic

Description: William III, Prince of Orange, ascended the throne of England after the English Glorious Revolution of 1688. The next year, the American colonists rebelled against colonial administrations in the name of their new king. This thesis examines William's perception of these rebellions and the impact his perception had on colonial structures following the Glorious Revolution. Identifying William's modus operandi—his habit of acceding to other's political choices for expediency until decisive action could be taken to assert his true agenda—elucidates his imperial ambitions through the context of his actions. William, an enigmatic and taciturn figure, rarely spoke his mind and therefore his actions must speak for him. By first establishing his pattern of behavior during his early career in the Netherlands and England, this project analyzes William's long-term ambitions to bring the Americas under his direct control following the 1689 rebellions and establish colonial administrations more in line with his vision of a centralized English empire.
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Date: December 2018
Creator: Woodlock, Kylie Michelle
Partner: UNT Libraries

Enlightening Dark Tourism in Nepal

Description: This study aims to examine the motivation, experience and benefits of Nepalese domestic tourists visiting the seismic memorial sites after the 25 April 2015 earthquake (known as Gorkha earthquake). A total of 403 surveys was gathered from seismic sites of Nepal (Kathmandu, Bhaktapur and Patan). Data were tested to analyze why the tourists are interested in disaster sites and how their experience during their visit impact the benefits of the visits. Additionally, partial least square structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) was employed to test the relationships among tourist motivations, experiences, and perceived benefits at the dark tourism sites in Nepal. Among the five motivational factors discovered, the empirical results depict that emotional reaction is the strongest factor of the dark tourism motivation, affecting both cognitive and affective experiences. Additionally, this study confirms that cognitive experience is more influenced by dark tourism motivations than affective experience. Among the four experience factors examined in the study, self-reflection is found to have the strongest impact of three aspects of perceived dark tourism benefits, such as knowledge gain, fulfillment, and appreciation. Overall, the findings of the study provide important implications to the management sectors of dark tourism sites, enhancing the importance of providing cognitive experiences (i.e. distributing the educational materials about the dark tourism events and offering the knowledgeable tour guide who can guide the sites) and affective experience of the tourists (storytelling about the events, organizing educational and volunteering programs at the sites). Further, this study contributes to the limited literature in the context of dark tourism and provide important managerial and practical implications based on the case of Nepal earthquake in 2015.
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Date: December 2018
Creator: Thapa Magar, Asha
Partner: UNT Libraries

Critique, Hope, and Action: A Critical Content Analysis of Teacher-Selected Literature for the Elementary Classroom

Description: The purpose of this study was to analyze teacher-selected children's literature for its potential use with critical pedagogy in the elementary classroom. This multi-analytical study uses tenets from critical multicultural analysis (CMA) and components from visual analysis (VA) to guide a critical content analysis of teacher-selected children's literature. Since it is the only nationally-recognized book list solely selected by educators, the texts for this study were selected from the Teachers' Choices Reading List titles. Although prior research on teacher-selected literature for the potential use of critical pedagogy in the elementary classroom does not exist, the results of this study show many opportunities for such within the last three years of the Teachers' Choices Reading List. A discussion on these results is presented through Paulo Freire's concept of critical pedagogy, as described in three stages: critique, hope, and action. Implications for practice and research are suggested based on the results of the study.
Date: December 2018
Creator: Edwards, Jessica Lee Lavina
Partner: UNT Libraries

Chronic Homelessness and the Aging Population: Findings in a Homeless Sample from Arkansas

Description: Understanding underlying mechanisms and pathways that lead to chronic homelessness would help develop intervention strategies that could help prevent subsequent episodes of homelessness. Quantitative data for this cross-sectional study was gathered by interviewing individuals who were homeless in the State of Arkansas, using a structured survey between 2007 and 2011. Qualitative data was gathered using semi-structured interviews between 2016 and 2018. Chi-square statistics and a multivariate logistic regression model was used to analyze the quantitative data, while phenomenological methods were used to analyze the qualitative data. Nearly half of the study participants identified themselves as being chronically homeless. Chronically homeless adults in this region were significantly more likely to be older men with no family ties, more likely to be victims of domestic violence, have higher rates of physical health problems, and have alcohol and substance abuse problems. Results from the multivariate nominal regression revealed that individuals who reported themselves as chronically homeless were more likely to be in the 50 years or older age group. In addition, study findings highlighted a dynamic interplay between three biopsychosocial risk factors for homelessness. Fostering development of inclusive sustainable communities, intergenerational relationships, and shared housing practices could help ease such social inequities and prevent problems such as chronic homelessness in older homeless adults.
Date: December 2018
Creator: Chekuri, Lakshminaray
Partner: UNT Libraries

Law Enforcement Training and Perceptions of Mental Illness

Description: This thesis analyzes the training and perceptions on mental health of a particular population. Through the use of previous research and literature, a survey was generated and distributed to the population. The findings were used to generate policy implications for the specific population that was analyzed.
Date: December 2018
Creator: Brabham, Sofia C
Partner: UNT Libraries

Design Principles for Metal-Coordinated Frameworks as Electrocatalysts for Energy Storage and Conversion

Description: In this dissertation, density functional theory calculations are performed to calculate the thermodynamic and electrochemical properties of metal coordinated frameworks for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Gibb's free energy, overpotential, charge transfer and ligands effect are evaluated. The charge transfer analysis shows the positive charges on the metal coordinated frameworks play an essential role in improving the electrochemical properties of the metal coordinated frameworks. Based on the calculations, design principles are introduced to rationally design and predict the electrochemical properties of metal coordinated frameworks as efficient catalysts for ORR and OER. An intrinsic descriptor is discovered for the first time, which can be used as a materials parameter for rational design of the metal coordinated frameworks for energy storage and conversion. The success of the design principles provides a better understanding of the mechanism behind ORR and OER and a screening approach for the best catalyst for energy storage and conversion.
Date: December 2018
Creator: Lin, Chun Yu
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Impact of American Conductors on the Development of Japanese Wind Band Repertoire as Evidenced in the Programming of Tokyo Kosei Wind Orchestra, Musashino Academia Musicae, Showa Academia Musicae, Senzoku Gakuen School of Music, and Tokyo University of the Arts

Description: The wind bands in Japan are considered by many scholars and wind band conductors to be among some of the finest ensembles in today's wind ensemble medium. The literature and repertoire of Japanese ensembles have evolved from orchestral transcriptions, patriotic music, and military marches to original compositions by European, American, and Japanese composers. British conductor Timothy Reynish states that Japanese wind band music has looked traditionally towards the United States and occasionally United Kingdom for inspiration and repertoire. This phenomenon can be attributed to the many collegiate American and the few English wind band conductors who traveled to Japan as guest conductors, and in some cases, became residents of Japan. The focus of this study is to closely examine this significant impact of American collegiate wind band conductors, their influence on Japanese programming and how that programming has affected the collegiate repertoire. This study includes surveys of repertoire, concert programs, discographies of recordings, and interviews with prominent American conductors currently conducting in Japan. This research documents the impact that American wind band conductors have had on the programming of Japanese wind bands and how their influence have altered the collegiate repertoire. Evidence of this impact is documented by Toshio Akiyama, who states that "The influence of visiting musicians from abroad must be measured as one of the most influential aspects affecting Japanese band growth. Although the effect of Japanese musicians traveling to the United States or Europe has been beneficial, the overall impact on large numbers of people has been more directly due to the visitors from abroad."
Date: December 2018
Creator: Lo, Albert
Partner: UNT Libraries

Teacher Perceptions of Student Engagement as Related to Technology Implementation in the Classroom

Description: The challenges of at-risk students are not new. Newspaper articles from the 1860s presented information about communities seeking to help students to complete school and find employment to provide a livable wage. Today's solutions focus on legislation intended to affect societal change and provide equitable opportunities for at-risk students. Much research regarding how to improve academic outcomes for at-risk students addresses high school level, identifying those factors that encourage secondary learners to remain in school. However, less work has been done investigating whether earlier intervention can obviate later retention efforts by improving students' learning outcomes in the elementary grades. In this vein, engagement is a factor found to positively influence learning, particularly when students are actively engaged with instructional content. Technology can facilitate such interactions between students and content; however, research is needed to better understand the relationship between student engagement and technology, particularly with at-risk students in elementary settings. Seeking to address the gap, this qualitative study examined the occasion of a fifth-grade school that recently implemented 1:1 technology. Using a case study approach, researchers explored the effects of the 1:1 Chromebook implementation on teacher-perceived student engagement at the elementary level. This study sought to better understand how this school technology application influenced student engagement including constructs such as relevance, novelty, and gamification. Teachers in the study expressed that their students' engagement levels increased with Chromebook use. They identified relevance, autonomy, and novelty as reasons for students' engagement with the technology.
Date: December 2018
Creator: Mata, Jodi Lane
Partner: UNT Libraries

High Temperature Water as an Etch and Clean for SiO2 and Si3N4

Description: An environmentally friendly, and contamination free process for etching and cleaning semiconductors is critical to future of the IC industry. Under the right conditions, water has the ability to meet these requirements. Water becomes more reactive as a function of temperature in part because the number of hydronium and hydroxyl ions increase. As water approaches its boiling point, the concentration of these species increases over seven times their concentrations at room temperature. At 150 °C, when the liquid state is maintained, these concentrations increase 15 times over room temperature. Due to its enhanced reactivity, high temperature water (HTW) has been studied as an etch and clean of thermally grown SiO2, Si3N4, and low-k films. High temperature deuterium oxide (HT-D2O) behaves similarly to HTW; however, it dissociates an order of magnitude less than HTW resulting in an equivalent reduction in reactive species. This allowed for the effects of reactive specie concentration on etch rate to be studied, providing valuable insight into how HTW compares to other high temperature wet etching processes such as hot phosphoric acid (HPA). Characterization was conducted using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to determine chemical changes due to etching, spectroscopic ellipsometry to determine film thickness, profilometry to measure thickness change across the samples, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), contact angle to measure changes in wetting behavior, and UV-Vis spectroscopy to measure dissolved silica in post etch water. HTW has demonstrated the ability to effective etch both SiO2 and Si3N4, HT-D2O also showed similar etch rates of Si3N4 indicating that a threshold reactive specie concentration is needed to maximize etch rate at a given temperature and additional reactive species do not further increase the etch rate. Because HTW has no hazardous byproducts, high temperature water could become a more environmentally friendly etchant of SiO2 and Si3N4 thin films.
Date: December 2018
Creator: Barclay, Joshua David
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Multi-Methodology Study of the Historic Impact of Soft Systems Methodology and Its Associated Data Visualization Approach in the Context of Operations and Business Strategy

Description: The purpose of this three-essay dissertation was to expand knowledge and theory regarding soft systems methodologies (SSMs) and data visualization approaches in business, engineering, and other social sciences. The first essay depicts a bibliometric analysis study of the historic impacts of SSM from 1980-2018 on business, engineering, and other social sciences fields. This study found 285 articles that described or employed SSM for research and included outcomes such as top SSM authors, author citation impacts, common dissemination outlets, time-bound distribution of publications, and other relevant findings. This study provided a picture of who, what, why, when, and where SSM has had the greatest impact on academic thought and practice. The second essay presents research on the academic impact of Systemigrams, an associated data visualization approach, finding examples of conceptual or research development that employed Systemigrams to depict complex problem situations. Recommendations for improvement of designing these data visualizations to increase their field use resulted from this study. The final essay leverages a selection of the articles as use cases to produce a grounded theory study to identify phenomena that arose from the use of SSM for operations and firm strategy research. This study identified two broad themes including (i) scope, structure, and process challenges and (ii) performance and evaluation limitations. These themes were explained by six patterns that emerged from the publications. Each produced change recommendations for SSM process, practice, and reporting to support its continued viability and adoption in business and operations research.
Date: December 2018
Creator: Warren, Scott Joseph
Partner: UNT Libraries

Real-Time Finger Spelling American Sign Language Recognition Using Deep Convolutional Neural Networks

Description: This thesis presents design and development of a gesture recognition system to recognize finger spelling American Sign Language hand gestures. We developed this solution using the latest deep learning technique called convolutional neural networks. This system uses blink detection to initiate the recognition process, Convex Hull-based hand segmentation with adaptive skin color filtering to segment hand region, and a convolutional neural network to perform gesture recognition. An ensemble of four convolutional neural networks are trained with a dataset of 25254 images for gesture recognition and a feedback unit called head pose estimation is implemented to validate the correctness of predicted gestures. This entire system was developed using Python programming language and other supporting libraries like OpenCV, Tensor flow and Dlib to perform various image processing and machine learning tasks. This entire application can be deployed as a web application using Flask to make it operating system independent.
Date: December 2018
Creator: Viswavarapu, Lokesh Kumar
Partner: UNT Libraries

Understanding Employability Development Skills through Co-Curricular Activities

Description: Employability skill development is being increasingly investigated among higher education scholars, corporate hiring managers, and governments around the world. Understanding employability skill development is important because it has implications on educational policy, teaching techniques, curriculum designs, and recruitment practices. This study was conducted at a public research university in a southwestern state of the United States. It was designed to understand the difference in employability skill development among students who participated in a leadership development program compared to those who did not. Additionally, the study investigated what skills were seeing the most change among student participated in the leadership development program, and if a student's major of study played any role in their overall employability development over the course of a year. Eight employability skills were tested in a pre- and post-test model. Results indicated that students in leadership development programs are more likely to see an increase in employability skill development. From the skills tested among participates, those in the leadership program found the most change over time in the area of problem solving skills. Finally, the results also indicate that a student's major does have an impact on their overall employability skill development. Students who major in business had significantly higher employability scores than those in other majors at the university.
Date: December 2018
Creator: Cleveland, Rachel
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Meta-Analysis of the Effects of Turkey's Technology Integration Initiative on Teachers' Attitudes

Description: The purpose of this study was to determine the overall effectiveness of Turkey's technology integration initiative on teachers' attitudes and examine the moderating effects of related study characteristics. The 22 studies in this meta-analysis, carried out between the years 2010 and 2017, investigated the effects of Turkey's technology integration initiative on teachers' attitudes and met the inclusion criteria. This study followed a traditional meta-analysis research approach utilizing Hedge's g effect size to combine studies. The effect size was calculated using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis (CMA) software. The result (g = .31) indicates that Turkey's technology integration initiative had a moderate but significant influence on teacher attitudes. In addition to teacher attitudes, barriers that could contribute to some K–12 teachers' lack of integration training were identified. Based on the results it is recommended that future professional development and training for teachers include assessments of teacher technology usage by administrators, an increase in time for collaborative planning among teachers, and more just-in-time technology support for technology integration.
Date: December 2018
Creator: Gorunmek, Fatih
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Model of Treatment Compliance Behavior of Patients with Chronic Disease in the Age of Predictive Medicine: The Role of Normative Beliefs

Description: The purposes of this study are: a) to understand the treatments compliance behavior of the patient with chronic disease at the behavioral level, particularly, the relationship between treatments compliance behavior and normative beliefs; b) develop a behavioral model of patient's treatments compliance behavior that could be used for predicting, combating, treating, tracking and controlling the treatments compliance behavior of the patients with chronic disease. Seventy-two patients from senior daycare centers in the Dallas area, who suffer or had suffered from at least, one chronic disease, participated in the study. Data gathering was conducted using paper-based questionnaire. The most significant finding of this study is the relationship between normative beliefs and the treatments compliance behavior of the patient with chronic disease. Normative beliefs were found to have significant impact on the treatments compliance intent and behavior of the patients with chronic disease. Another important finding showed that side-effects of prescribed treatments have little or no influence on the treatments compliance behavior of the patient with chronic disease. A relationship between the effectiveness of medicine, particularly, predictive medicine, and treatments compliance behavior was established. The design of the study was intended to provide coverages for a set of constructs that may be the interacting units in the environment of any chronic disease treatments decision. It depicts relational, information communications links between the constructs. The Imhonde model of treatments compliance behavior was designed to include cultural norms and other beliefs that are significant for real-time human ailments decisions behaviors. It is recommended that further studies may include the use of a larger population of participants from diverse cultures and localities in multiple states and countries, with the object of finding the differences that culture and local environments may have on the normative leaning for treatments compliance behavioral decisions in chronic disease cases.
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Date: December 2018
Creator: Imhonde, Benjamin A.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Adolescent Academic Adjustment during Chronic Illness: Online Training for Child Life Specialists

Description: Frequent absences resulting from a chronic illness can disrupt adolescent school involvement, impacting academic achievement and psychosocial development as a result. This study explores whether certified child life specialists (CCLSs) could be a resource for parents as they address their adolescents' academic disruptions. Specifically, this study assesses an online training program designed to increase CCLSs' knowledge and self-efficacy as related to adolescents' academic adjustment following frequent absences. This knowledge and skill based training was designed as a three part module with sections including: academic considerations, psychosocial considerations, and availability of school resources in promoting successful adolescent academic adjustment. 62 CCLSs were recruited to participate and complete measures evaluating knowledge, in relation to content included in each module, and self-efficacy, involving communication with parents in regards to adolescent academic adjustment. T-tests were conducted to determine whether there were differences in reports of self-efficacy and knowledge following participation in the intervention between and within the treatment and control groups. Results indicate statistical significance for enhanced knowledge and self-efficacy for the treatment group at post-test. Therefore, the outcomes from this study support the effectiveness of brief online training in fostering knowledge and feelings of efficacy for CCLSs in a context not typically included in child life education or certification. As a result, findings from this study may be used to expand intervention programs in the clinical setting to provide more comprehensive psychosocial care to adolescents diagnosed with a chronic illness.
Date: December 2018
Creator: Koussa, Michelle D
Partner: UNT Libraries

Creative Matter: Exploring the Co-Creative Nature of Things

Description: This dissertation is about new materialism as it relates to art education. It is a speculative inquiry that seeks to illuminate the interconnectivity of things by considering the ways in which things participate in generative practices of perceiving and making. To do so, the dissertation pioneers an arts-based methodology that allows for broad considerations about who and what can be considered an agent in the process of art making. In this inquiry, the researcher is an artist-participant with other more-than-human and human participants to construct an (im)material autohistoria-teoría, a revisionist interdisciplinary artwork inspired by the work of Anzaldúa. The term w/e is developed and discussed as new language for expanding upon Braidotti's posthumanist subjectivity. New theories called thing(k)ing (including found poetry) and (im)materiality are discussed as movements towards better understanding the contributions of the more-than-human in artmaking practices.
Date: December 2018
Creator: Hood, Emily Jean
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Text Analysis of Data Science Career Opportunities and U.S. iSchool Curriculum

Description: Data science employment opportunities of varied complexity and environment are in growing demand across the globe. Data science as a discipline potentially offers a wealth of jobs to prospective employees, while traditional information science-based roles continue to decrease as budgets get cut across the U.S. Since data is related closely to information historically, this research will explore the education of U.S. iSchool professionals and compare it to traditional data science roles being advertised within the job market. Through a combination of latent semantic analysis of over 1600 job postings and iSchool course documentation, it is our aim to explore the intersection of library and information science and data science. Hopefully these research findings will guide future directions for library and information science professionals into data science driven roles, while also examining and highlighting the data science techniques currently driven by the education of iSchool professionals. In addition, it is our aim to understand how data science could benefit from a mutually symbiotic relationship with the field of information science as statistically data scientists spend far too much time working on data preparation and not nearly enough time conducting scientific inquiry. The results of this examination will potentially guide future directions of iSchool students and professionals towards more cooperative data science roles and guide future research into the intersection between iSchools and data science and possibilities for partnership.
Date: December 2018
Creator: Durr, Angel Krystina
Partner: UNT Libraries

Electrically Tunable Absorption and Perfect Absorption Using Aluminum Doped Zinc Oxide and Graphene Sandwiched in Oxides

Description: Understanding the fundamental physics in light absorption and perfect light absorption is vital for device applications in detector, sensor, solar energy harvesting and imaging. In this research study, a large area fabrication of Al-doped ZnO/Al2O3/graphene/Al2O3/gold/silicon device was enabled by a spin-processable hydrophilic mono-layer graphene oxide. In contrast to the optical properties of noble metals, which cannot be tuned or changed, the permittivity of transparent metal oxides, such as Al-doped ZnO and indium tin oxide, are tunable. Their optical properties can be adjusted via doping or tuned electrically through carrier accumulation and depletion, providing great advantages for designing tunable photonic devices or realizing perfect absorption. A significant shift of Raman frequency up to 360 cm-1 was observed from graphene in the fabricated device reported in this work. The absorption from the device was tunable with a negative voltage applied on the Al-doped ZnO side. The generated absorption change was sustainable when the voltage was off and erasable when a positive voltage was applied. The reflection change was explained by the Fermi level change in graphene. The sustainability of tuned optical property in graphene can lead to a design of device with less power consumption.
Date: December 2018
Creator: Adewole, Murthada Oladele
Partner: UNT Libraries

Relationships between Job Satisfaction, Work Engagement, and Turnover Intention of Health Science Teachers

Description: The purpose of this research was to investigate the relationships between job satisfaction, work engagement, and turnover intention of health science teachers in the state of Texas. The healthcare profession is one of the largest growing occupations in the U.S. nationwide. The job growth outlook for healthcare professionals is projected to be on average 34% between 2014 and 2024. Despite the growing healthcare job categories, there is a shortage of healthcare professionals in the U.S. This study addressed the shortage of health science teachers in secondary education. Considering the importance of healthcare, especially with an aging U.S. population, it is critical to study the impact of work engagement and job satisfaction on teacher intent to leave the health science teaching profession. Through a correlational survey research design it was found that job satisfaction and work engagement are negatively related to turnover intention. Hierarchical regression analysis indicated that job satisfaction accounted for 39.6% of the variation in turnover intention. Findings also showed that work engagement did not moderate the relationship between job satisfaction and turnover intention. Implications for research and practice are discussed and conclusions are provided.
Date: December 2018
Creator: Park, Kathleen A.
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Random Walk Version of Robbins' Problem

Description: Robbins' problem is an optimal stopping problem where one seeks to minimize the expected rank of their observations among all observations. We examine random walk analogs to Robbins' problem in both discrete and continuous time. In discrete time, we consider full information and relative ranks versions of this problem. For three step walks, we give the optimal stopping rule and the expected rank for both versions. We also give asymptotic upper bounds for the expected rank in discrete time. Finally, we give upper and lower bounds for the expected rank in continuous time, and we show that the expected rank in the continuous time problem is at least as large as the normalized asymptotic expected rank in the full information discrete time version.
Date: December 2018
Creator: Allen, Andrew
Partner: UNT Libraries

Survey of Texas Secondary Transition and Employment Designees' Use of Evidence-Based Practices

Description: The role of transition providers' knowledge of evidence-based practices (EBPs) in secondary transition can only be understood in the context of the dismal post-secondary outcomes of students with disabilities (SWD) and the need for bridging the research-to-practice gap among secondary transition practitioners. A sample of 1,163 Texas Employment Designees (TEDs) were surveyed about their knowledge of secondary transition EBPs. The study examined the psychometric properties and theoretical factor structure fit of a modified version of the Mazzotti and Plotner's Use of Secondary Transition EBPs survey and identified significant effects of TEDs' characteristics on their capacity for implementing secondary transition EBPs (F(9, 110) = 2.16, p = 0.03). Psychometric validation of the instrument indicated overall reliability and internal consistency of the modified instrument in measuring both knowledge and use of EBPs in support and direct provision of transition services (Cronbach's alpha of 0.99). Principal components analysis (PCA) and exploratory factor analysis (EFA) returned a simple one-factor structure. A composite score was developed for the single factor of "capacity", and a subsequent analysis was conducted to determine a relationship between the demographic factors and the overall capacity scores of respondents (n = 198). Study limitations and need for further research are discussed.
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Date: December 2018
Creator: Park, Nicole M.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Synthesis and Studies of AzaBODIPY Derived Donor-Acceptor Systems for Light Induced Charge Separation

Description: The efficiency and mechanism of electron- and energy transfer events occurring in both in natural and synthetic donor-acceptor systems depend on their distance, relative orientation, and the nature of the surrounding media. Fundamental knowledge gained from model studies is key in building efficient energy harvesting and optoelectronic devices. Faster charge separation and slower charge recombination in donor-acceptor systems is often sought out. In our continued effort to build donor-acceptor systems using near-IR sensitizers, in the present study, we report ground and excited state charge transfer in newly synthesized, directly linked, tetrads featuring bisdonor (donor = phenothiazine and ferrocene), BF2-chelated azadipyrromethane (azaBODIPY) and C60 entities. The tetrads synthesized using multi-step synthetic procedure revealed strong charge transfer interactions in the ground state involving the donor and azaBODIPY entities. The near-IR emitting azaBODIPY acted as a photosensitizing electron acceptor along with fullerene while the phenothiazine and ferrocene entities acted as electron donors. The triads (bisdonor-azaBODIPY) and tetrads revealed ultrafast photoinduced charge separation leading to D•+-azaBODIPY•–-C60 and D•+-azaBODIPY-C60•– (D = phenothiazine or ferrocene) charge separated states from the femtosecond transient absorption spectral studies in both polar and nonpolar solvent media. The charge separated states populated the triplet excited state of azaBODIPY prior returning to the ground state.
Date: December 2018
Creator: Collini, Melissa A.
Partner: UNT Libraries