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Dmitri Shostakovich and the Fugues of Op. 87: A Bach Bicentennial Tribute

Description: In 1950-51, for the bicentennial of the death of J. S. Bach, Dmitri Shostakovich wrote his collection of Twenty-four Preludes and Fugues, Op. 87. This thesis is a study of the fugal technique of Shostakovich as observed in Op. 87, in light of the fugal style of Bach as observed in The Well-Tempered Clavier, Volume One. Individual analyses of each of the twenty-four Shostakovich pieces yield the conclusion that Op. 87 is an emulation of Bachian fugal methods as observed in The Well-Tempered Clavier, Volume One.
Date: August 1981
Creator: Adams, Robert M. (Robert Michael)
Partner: UNT Libraries

A History of Concert Waltzes for Piano (Lecture-Recital) Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works by Rachmaninov, Stravinsky, Schubert, J.S. Bach, Reger, Adams, Covino, Chopin, Schönberg, Ives, and Beethoven

Description: The first three recitals contained solely performances of piano music. The first one consisted of an Etude-Tableau by Rachmaninov, the Capriccio by Stravinsky (the chamberensemble accompaniment arranged for second piano), and the great Sonata in A minor by Schubert. The second recital contained a Prelude and Fugue by J. S. Bach, Reger's Variations and Fugue on a Theme by Bach, a Romance by the performer, Peter Covino's Toccatina Op. 4 No. 8, and Chopin's Nocturne Op. 55 No. 2 and Scherzo in E. The third recital consisted of Schonberg's Sechs Kleine Klavierstilcke, Ives's Some South-Paw Pitching, and the Sonata Op. 106 ("Hammerklavier") by Beethoven. The fourth recital featured a lecture which surveyed the piano waltz throughout its history. Several complete examples, namely Weber's Invitation to the Dance, Chopin's Waltz in A minor, and La Valse by Ravel, and incomplete examples including a Lundler by the performer, several of Schubert's waltzes, Chopin's Waltz Op. 42, and Man Lebt Nur Einmal! by Strauss-Tausig interspersed the lecture. All four recitals, tape-recorded, and the lecture, typewritten, are filed together in the Graduate Office of the North Texas State University.
Date: May 1978
Creator: Adams, William Lloyd, Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Flute Professors of the Paris Conservatoire from Devienne to Taffanel, 1795-1908

Description: Since its establishment (1795), the Paris Conservatoire has attracted top-ranking flutists who, through their playing, teaching, writings, and attitudes, (toward the Boehm flute, for example), have influenced flutists and composers throughout Europe. Through Paul Taffanel, who founded the Societe d'Instruments a Vent in 1876, standards of woodwind playing reached new heights. When Taffanel's students, Georges Laurent and Georges Barrere, emigrated to the United States, they influenced the style and development of flute-playing in this country. Through Barrere's famous student, William Kincaid, there arose what might be termed the American school. The intent of this paper is to place these flutists in perspective. The professors are discussed chronologically; information on the style, works, students, and influence of each man is included.
Date: August 1980
Creator: Ahmad, Patricia
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Stylistic Evaluation of Charles Valentin Alkan's Piano Music: a Lecture Recital, together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of J.S. Bach, Beethoven, Brahms, Liszt, Schumann, and Villa-Lobos

Description: Charles Valentin Alkan (1813-1888), one of the great genii in music history, was widely misunderstood by his contemporaries because of his highly idiosyncratic ideas. From the perspective of the late twentieth century, his innovations can be better understood, and his music is now gaining wider appreciation. Yet, today many musicians still do not know even his name, much less his achievements. The year 1988 marks the one hundredth year since his death. In commemoration of this centennial anniversary, this thesis is presented as a plea for a greater awareness of the achievements of this important figure in the development of piano music.
Date: December 1988
Creator: Ahn, Joel, 1957-
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Study of Style and Influence in the Early Schools of Violin Making Circa 1540 to Circa 1800

Description: Chapter I of this thesis details contemporary historical views on the origins of the violin and its terminology. Chapters II through VI study the methodologies of makers from Italy, the Germanic Countries, the Low Countries, France, and England, and highlights the aspects of these methodologies that show influence from one maker to another. Chapter VII deals with matters of imitation, copying, violin forgery and the differences between these categories. Chapter VIII presents a discussion of the manner in which various violin experts identify the maker of a violin. It briefly discusses a new movement that questions the current methods of authentication, proposing that the dual role of "expert/dealer" does not lend itself to sufficient objectivity. The conclusion suggests that dealers, experts, curators, and musicologists alike must return to placing the first emphasis on the tradition of the craft rather than on the individual maker.
Date: December 1987
Creator: Alcorn-Oppedahl, Allison A. (Allison Ann)
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Choral-Orchestral Works of Hector Berlioz

Description: In this study the choral-orchestral compositions produced by Hector Berlioz are examined in detail for characteristics of musical form, textual setting, and methods of scoring for chorus and orchestra. Reasons for the preponderance of the choral-orchestral medium in Berlioz' output are examined in two introductory chapters. The initial chapter concerns Berlioz' personal experiences as an observer, conductor, and critic of choral music, while the second is devoted to Parisian customs in regard to the choral-orchestral medium during the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Included in the historical chapter is a discussion of the haute-contre (high tenor or countertenor) voice preferred in French choruses of that period plus a short review of French orchestral practices, operatic choruses, the French Chapel, Parisian concert societies, and the Paris Conservatory. Especially important is the segment on revolutionary musical fetes which fostered grandiose compositions for chorus and instruments of extremely simple structure. Berlioz' sense of form was governed by his Gallic heritage and for this reason many critics have accused him of formlessness, when in fact his compositions invaribly revolve around a succinct formal plan, admirably executed. Berlioz added to the conservative French tradition which favored the strophe and the Rondeau (an unvarying refrain following disparate couplets) a decidedly learned and classical approach to music structuring; unfortunately, this unique combination of academic compositional techniques and Gallic forms has been a source of perplexity for analysts in search of traditional Germanic forms. Surprisingly, Berlioz makes frequent use of such complex compositional devices as augmentation, fugato, canon, pedal point, and even cantus firmus.
Date: May 1978
Creator: Alexander, Metche Franke
Partner: UNT Libraries

Representative Nineteenth-Century Choral Symphonies

Description: This study is concerned with the examination of choral symphonies by major nineteenth-century composers. Its purpose is to delineate the common characteristics which these works have. Emphasis is given to the investigation of the choral elements in the symphonies. Detailed musicological studies of nineteenth-century music are minimal; there has. been a particular lack of interest in nineteenth-century works for chorus. Therefore, the principal sources of data for this study were the full scores of the following nine symphonies: Beethoven's Symphony No. 9, Berlioz' Romeo and Juliet and the Funeral and Triumphal Symphony, Mendelssohn's Lobgesang, Liszt's Faust Symphony and Dante Syrmphony, and Mahler's Symphonies Nos. 2., 3, and 8. Other important sources included major biographies of the composers of the symphonies listed. chapter is devoted to each of these composers, subdivided as follows: a general survey of the composer's other works for chorus and/or orchestra; the historical facts connected with the composition and first performance of the individual symphonies; analysis; and conclusions.
Date: December 1971
Creator: Alexander, Metche Franke
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Nocturnes of Chopin

Description: John Field (1782-1837), an Irishman, was the first composer to use the French term "nocturne," and was the inventor of the nocturne for piano. It can be seen with a glance at the scores that the orchestral notturni by the eighteenth century composers were very different than what is generally thought of today as a nocturne. Field introduced the idea of the nocturne that has remained much the same since. Frederic Chopin enlarged and improved the genre invented by Field, but it was Field's originality that brought this type of piece to piano literature. Indeed, John Field is hardly remembered today except as the inventor of the nocturne for the piano and for his influence on Chopin's Nocturnes. For that alone musicians will remain indebted to him.
Date: June 1957
Creator: Alexander, Monte Hill Davis
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Musical and Dramatic Analysis of the Principal Tenor Roles in Mozart's Singspiele

Description: This paper will examine one area of Mozart's work, the Singspiele. This study is an analysis of the principal tenor roles of Mozart's Singspiele. The organization for analyzing these works conforms to three periods in Mozart's life. (1) Childhood and Early Youth, to 1774; (2) The Period of the First Masterworks, 1774-1781; and (3) The Years in Vienna, 1781-1791. Related biographical data and historical background have been utilized in discussing each work. Because the Singspiele is a musical composition, analyses will consider music as the major source of development, using plot and character wholly as supporting features.
Date: December 1970
Creator: Alexander, Ronald C. (Ronald Curby)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Piano Sonatas Six, Seven and Eight of Prokofiev

Description: The Sixth, Seventh, and E Piano Sonatas of Prokofiev illustrate the composer's more mature style. In these works there is a definite return to the classic forms and contrapuntal devices which have been called Neo-classicism. Prokofiev, himself, has said that form is one of the basic elements of his style. It is the purpose of this thesis to discover the' formal organization and make a comparison of these sonatas with the works of Beethoven and his contemporaries.
Date: January 1956
Creator: Allen, Daniel Joseph
Partner: UNT Libraries

Drama and Characterization in Opera Settings of "A Midsummer Nightʼs Dream" by Britten and Siegmeister

Description: Although Shakespeare deliberately downplays characterization in his moonlit dream fantasy, both Britten and Siegmeister exploit this dramatic element as the basis of their opera settings of the play. Through the operas, the shallow characters take on new dimensions, creating musical experiences existing quite independently of Shakespeare, while at the same time retaining the atmosphere of a dream-fantasy. Placing emphases upon varying aspects of the play, the two composers create entirely different revelations from the Bard's dream. This paper presents a study of the way in which drama and characterization are treated in the operas, A Midsummer Night's Dream and Night of the Moonspell.
Date: August 1982
Creator: Allen, Debra K. (Debra Kaye)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Stylistic Analysis of "Banalités" by Francis Poulenc

Description: Because of the nature of the poetry, the interpretation of Banalites in this study has involved certain subjective decisions. These deductions were, nevertheless, colored by statements of the poet, the composer, and authorities on each. This is not to imply, however, that this is the only interpretation. Both poet and composer have given evidence that their creation requires a subjective response on the part of the interpreter. This is perhaps the greatest challenge offered by the work.
Date: January 1968
Creator: Allen, Joy Ann
Partner: UNT Libraries

An Investigation of Holland's Theory of Vocational Personalities and Work Environments As Applied to Undergraduate Music Majors

Description: Holland's theory of vocational personalities and work environments incorporates four theoretical constructs (congruence, consistency, differentiation and identity) which attempt to explain sources in variability of achievement and satisfaction among employed adults and college students. This study sought to: (1) investigate the relationship of Holland's constructs to academic achievement and educational satisfaction of undergraduate music majors; (2) investigate differences in all variables according to gender and degree major. Data were collected from undergraduate music majors (N = 100) enrolled at the University of North Texas using the Vocational Preference Inventory. Mv Vocational Situation. and the Music Major Satisfaction Questionnaire. Reliability for the Music Major Satisfaction Questionnaire was estimated at .92 using Cronbach's coefficient alpha. Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients indicated that: (1) congruence was significantly related to academic achievement and educational satisfaction; (2) identity was significantly related to academic achievement and educational satisfaction; (3) consistency was significantly related to academic achievement, but not to educational satisfaction; (4) differentiation was significantly related to academic achievement, but not to educational satisfaction. Multiple regression using a stepwise entry method indicated that: (1) the identity construct was the best predictor of educational satisfaction scores; (2) identity was the best predictor of academic achievement scores. The results of the study suggested: (1) it is unlikely that any single theory accounts for all dimensions of variability in achievement among college music majors. To arrive at a comprehensive model of achievement, it will be necessary to utilize constructs of several theories. Such a model should include Holland's constructs of identity, congruence, and possibly differentiation. (2) similarly, a comprehensive model of satisfaction should include Holland's constructs of identity and congruence. (3) Holland's classification system may distinguish among two traditionally held divisions of college music majors, performance majors and education majors. (4) music education majors and music performance majors differ on ...
Date: August 1989
Creator: Allen, Michael, 1954-
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Comparative Study of Three Sonatas for Solo Brass Instruments and Piano by Paul Hindemith

Description: In the years during the writing of The Craft of Musical Composition, and for the next few years afterwards, Hindemith was engaged in writing a solo sonata for each of the instruments of the orchestra. Muser states that this series of sonatas continues a definite policy of providing music for people who want to play music, and not merely to listen to it. The three sonatas for solo brass instruments and piano were written during this period. The sonatas, written for trumpet, horn, and trombone, were written in the following order: Sonata for Trumpet and Piano—1939; Sonata for Horn and Piano—1939; Sonata for Trombone and Piano—1941. These sonatas, being written rather closely together, should have certain stylistic characteristics in common, and there should also be certain features peculiar to each sonata. To study these sonatas and compare them with each other structurally and stylistically is the purpose of this work.
Date: June 1957
Creator: Alley, Edward Lee
Partner: UNT Libraries

Carlos Seixas: The Development of the Keyboard Sonata in Eighteenth-Century Portugal. A Lecture Recital Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of Johann Sebastian Bach, Samuel Barber, Ludwig van Beethoven, Fréderic Chopin, César Franck, Sergei Prokofieff, and Alexander Scriabin

Description: This presentation demonstrates the significance both historically and aesthetically of the obscure Portuguese composer Carlos Seixas, (1704-1742), to the development of the keyboard sonata during the transitional period between the Baroque and Classic eras. The relationship between Seixas and his better-known colleague Domenico Scarlatti is explored and particular musical styles and techniques generally assumed as innovations of the latter composer are shown to exist in keyboard works of Seixas which probably pre-date those of Scarlatti. Thematically-related multi-movement sonatas and structural techniques anticipating the ternary single-movement sonata design are illustrated in several of Seixas1 sonatas. In addition to the recorded performance of selected sonatas by Seixas, this dissertation includes three tape recordings of selected piano works by J. S. Bach, Barber, Beethoven, Chopin, Franck, Prokofieff, and Scriabin.
Date: August 1982
Creator: Allison, Brian J. (Brian Jerome)
Partner: UNT Libraries

An Analysis of Maurice Ravel's Technique of Orchestration

Description: It is interesting to note that several of Ravel's compositions for the piano were successful only after he had orchestrated them. Ravel, a pianist, had a natural gift for orchestration, and when writing for the piano he seems to have projected his thoughts to the orchestra; thus some of his works are more successful' for the orchestra than for the piano. Since he orchestrated several of his own piano compositions, these present an excellent opportunity for a study of his orchestrations.
Date: August 1958
Creator: Allman, Murray Augustus
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Chorale Partita in the Baroque Period, A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of J. S. Bach, C. Franck, M. Duruflé, D. Buxtehude, J. Alain, J. G. Walther, Roger-Ducasse, H. Willan, J. Dandrieu, J. Langlais, J. Guillou, J. P. Sweelinck, J. Reubke, G. Bohm, and Others

Description: The lecture recital was given on August 9, 1974. Chorale partitas by Sweelinck, Scheidt, B051hm, and Walther were performed following a lecture on the chorale partita in the Baroque period. The lecture included a discussion of the instruments that the partitas were written for and the functions for which they were written. The works of Sweelinck and Scheidt and their influence on later composers were discussed. A number of lesser-known composers and their works were mentioned. Also, there was a discussion of works by well-known composers such as Bohm, Pachelbel, Buxtehude, Walther, and Bach. In addition to the lecture recital, three other public recitals were performed, all of which consisted of solo compositions for the organ. The first solo recital, including works of Buxtehude, Bach, Walther, Pepping, ?ranck, Alain, and Durufle, was performed on July 18, 1971. On August 13, 1972 the second solo recital was performed. Compositions by Greene, Stanley, Searle, Willan, Dandrieu, Roger-Ducasse, and Langlais were included in the program. The third solo recital, which included works by Sweelinck, Bach, Guillou, and Reubke, was performed on June 5, 1974. The four programs were recorded on magnetic tape and are filed with the written version of the lecture material as a part of the dissertation.
Date: December 1974
Creator: Anderson, David Zane
Partner: UNT Libraries

Transcribing Orchestral Accompaniments of Large Choral Works for the Organ

Description: The art of transcribing orchestral accompaniments for organ is one of the most difficult problems which organists must face. Although a few will become professional recitalists, most organists will at one time or other have a church position and be required to play oratorios and other large choral compositions which were originally scored for orchestra. Several of the most popular of these works (Handel's Messiah, Saint-Saëns's Christmas Oratorio, Fauŕe's Requiem) have already been arranged for organ, but the majority are available only in piano reductions. The main body of the paper deals with this latter group of works, for it is here that the most urgent problems exist. However, some of the organ arrangements now available need considerable revision because they try to imitate the whole orchestra and are virtually impossible to play. Therefore, some preliminary comments on already existing transcriptions seem necessary.
Date: August 1966
Creator: Anderson, David Zane
Partner: UNT Libraries

Handel and Three Prima Donnas: Reciprocal Influences, a Lecture Recital, Together with Two Recitals of Selected Works of W. A. Mozart, F. Schubert, H. Wolf, R. Strauss, G. Fauré, C. Debussy, D. Moore, and Others, and Opera Roles by Pleyel and Rossini

Description: The lecture recital was given April 1, 1974. Eighteenth-century accounts of the voices and performing styles of Francesca Cuzzoni, Faustina Bordoni, and Anna Strada del Pò were related to six opera arias written for them by George Frideric Handel. The arias, accompanied by harpsichord, violin, and violoncello, were performed with added original ornamentation. In addition to the lecture recital two other public recitals and two opera roles were performed. The first solo recital was on February 11, 1972, and included works by Mozart, Fauré, Rimsky-Korsakov, R. Strauss, Walton, Moore, and others. The second solo recital, on October 15, 1973, included works by Porpora, Rameau, Handel, Wolf, Donizetti, Debussy, and Schubert. The role of "Urgele" in the marionette opera Die Fee Urgele by Pleyel was performed in English on October 30 and 31, 1972, with the Collegium Musicum of North Texas State University. The role of "Clorinda" in Rossini's La Cenerentola was performed in English on November 26 and 28, 1972, with the Shreveport Symphony.
Date: May 1974
Creator: Armes, Mary Beth
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Survey of the Influence of Heinrich Schenker on American Music Theory and Its Pedagogy Since 1940

Description: This study investigates the influence of the Austrian music theorist Heinrich Schenker on American music theory since 1940, including a survey of writings related to Schenker and theory textbooks displaying his influence. The Schenker influence on American music theory includes many journal articles on Schenker and his principal students. His methods are employed often in analytical discussions of various issues. In addition to numerous dissertations and theses written about Schenker, a number of textbooks are now based wholly or in part on his approach to musical understanding. The current trend towards accepting Schenker's theories is likely to continue as more people are exposed to his teachings.
Date: December 1974
Creator: Austin, John C.
Partner: UNT Libraries

An Investigation of the Laryngeal Activity of Trumpet Players During the Performance of Selected Exercises

Description: The study's purpose was to describe selected laryngeal activity of brass-wind players during the performance of selected musical exercises. Research problems included the observation and description of three internal areas of activity of ten trumpeters as they performed each exercise. Specific areas of observation were 1) movement of the epiglottis during the performance of each exercise, 2) movement of the vocal folds/arytenoid cartilage which includes changes in the size of the glottis during the performance of each prescribed exercise, and 3) movement of the thyroid cartilage during the performance of each prescribed exercise. Musical exercises performed by each of the subjects included a sound volume change, use of vibrato, single-tonguing, step-wise descending and ascending slurs, descending and ascending lip slurs, register change, and a descending chromatic scale. In addition, each subject performed an excerpt from the second movement of the Haydn Trumpet Concerto. Data were collected through direct observation of subject performances and then described using three different means. Data analyses revealed a prominent amount of highly individual, non-patterned laryngeal activity which played an integral role in the performance of each subject. Individuals including Law (1960), Cramer (1955), Jacobs (Stewart, 1987), and Noble (1964) have advocated an unrestricted airway during brass performance. Contrary to this advice, findings in the present study indicate that a great deal of varying, involuntary restriction is present in the laryngeal area during performance. Further, such activity appears necessary to brass performance. Others, including Farkas (1962), Schuller (1962), and Wick (1971) , have endorsed conscious use of the glottis during brass performance. While findings in the present study imply that there is a presence of voluntary or reflexive glottal activity during brass performance, evidence does not support any theory which suggests conscious use of the laryngeal mechanism.
Date: December 1989
Creator: Bailey, Robert E. (Robert Elwood), 1946-
Partner: UNT Libraries

"Santa Eulalia M. Md. 7": a Critical Edition and Study of Sacred Part Music from Colonial Northwestern Guatemala

Description: Santa Eulalia M. Md. 7, dated January 20, 1600, is part of the San Miguel Acatán Repertory, which originated in the northwestern highlands of Guatemala and is presently owned by the Lilly Library of Indiana University. The manuscript contains thirty-four four-part songs and dances, two thirds of which are villancicos for Christmas, Easter, the Eucharist, and the feasts of All Saints and St. Michael. The remaining third consists of Latin biblical texts in either fabordón or contrapuntal settings, three pieces with Náhuatl texts, and an instrumental pavana. The thesis contains a modern edition of Santa Eulalia M. Md. 7 with critical notes and commentary, a comparison of the pieces with villancicos and fabordones of European origin, and a survey of several aspects of Mayan culture.
Date: May 1981
Creator: Baird, Sheila Raney
Partner: UNT Libraries