UNT Theses and Dissertations - 5 Matching Results

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FORTRAN Optimizations at the Source Code Level

Description: This paper discusses FORTRAN optimizations that the user can perform manually at the source code level to improve object code performance. It makes use of descriptive examples within the text of the paper for explanatory purposes. The paper defines key areas in writing a FORTRAN program and recommends ways to improve efficiency in these areas.
Date: August 1977
Creator: Barber, Willie D.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Execution Time Analysis through Software Monitors

Description: The analysis of an executing program and the isolation of critical code has been a problem since the first program was written. This thesis examines the process of program analysis through the use of a software monitoring system. Since there is a trend toward structured languages a subset of PL/I was developed t~o exhibit source statement monitoring and costing techniques. By filtering a PL/W program through a preorocessor which determines the cost of source statements and inserts monitoring code, a post-execution analysis of the program can be obtained. This analysis displays an estimated time cost for each source statements the number of times the statement w3s executed, and the product of these values. Additionally, a bar graph is printed in order to quickly locate very active code.
Date: December 1977
Creator: Whistler, Wayne C.
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Computer Algorithm for Synthetic Seismograms

Description: Synthetic seismograms are a computer-generated aid in the search for hydrocarbons. Heretofore the solution has been done by z-transforms. This thesis presents a solution based on the method of finite differences. The resulting algorithm is fast and compact. The method is applied to three variations of the problem, all three are reduced to the same approximating equation, which is shown to be optimal, in that grid refinement does not change it. Two types of algorithms are derived from the equation. The number of obvious multiplications, additions and subtractions of each is analyzed. Critical section of each requires one multiplication, two additions and two subtractions. Four sample synthetic seismograms are shown. Implementation of the new algorithm runs twice as fast as previous computer program.
Date: August 1977
Creator: Isaacson, James
Partner: UNT Libraries

Automated Testing of Interactive Systems

Description: Computer systems which interact with human users to collect, update or provide information are growing more complex. Additionally, users are demanding more thorough testing of all computer systems. Because of the complexity and thoroughness required, automation of interactive systems testing is desirable, especially for functional testing. Many currently available testing tools, like program proving, are impractical for testing large systems. The solution presented here is the development of an automated test system which simulates human users. This system incorporates a high-level programming language, ATLIS. ATLIS programs are compiled and interpretively executed. Programs are selected for execution by operator command, and failures are reported to the operator's console. An audit trail of all activity is provided. This solution provides improved efficiency and effectiveness over conventional testing methods.
Date: May 1977
Creator: Cartwright, Stephen C.
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Comparison of File Organization Techniques

Description: This thesis compares the file organization techniques that are implemented on two different types of computer systems, the large-scale and the small-scale. File organizations from representative computers in each class are examined in detail: the IBM System/370 (OS/370) and the Harris 1600 Distributed Processing System with the Extended Communications Operating System (ECOS). In order to establish the basic framework for comparison, an introduction to file organizations is presented. Additionally, the functional requirements for file organizations are described by their characteristics and user demands. Concluding remarks compare file organization techniques and discuss likely future developments of file systems.
Date: August 1977
Creator: Rogers, Roy Lee
Partner: UNT Libraries