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Identification of Predictors of Success in Individualized Computer Courses

Description: This study provides a rationale for advising students on whether to enroll in individualized/self-paced computer courses. It identifies seven factors that have a significant correlation with success in an individualized computer course. The sample comprises all the students enrolled in individualized computer courses at Lee College, Baytown, Texas in the spring semester of 1988. Students completed a survey to determine whether they had previous computer experiences, whether they operated with a level of introvert personality characteristics, and whether the individualized computer course was their first choice. Students completed a learning style inventory and a score was determined using the items relating to individualized computer studies. Data collected in the Lee College records office included high school percentile rank, standardized reading score, standardized mathematics score, college hours completed, course withdrawals, and age. The following seven factors were shown by the data to have a significant correlation with a final grade (in order of decreasing significance): (a) learning style inventory, (b) high school percentile, (c) standardized mathematics score, (d) standardized reading score, (e) previous computer experience, (f) number of college hours, and (g) age. The following three factors were shown by the data to have no significant correlation with a final grade: (a) course withdrawals, (b) degree of personality introversion, and (c) the individualized computer course as first choice. The findings substantiate the hypothesis that success in an individualized computer course might be attributed to certain factors, and once identified, these factors can be used in advising students. Advisors should use as many of the seven factors (identified as significant), as possible in helping students choose between individualized and traditional computer courses.
Date: August 1988
Creator: Russell, John D. (John David), 1938-
Partner: UNT Libraries

An Historical Review of Higher Education in Kenya Since 1975, with an Emphasis on Curriculum Development

Description: This study focuses on the history of higher education in Kenya since 1975, with an emphasis on curriculum development. The main purposes of the study were (1) to describe the historical events of higher education in Kenya since 1975, and (2) to analyze the present system of higher education in the country. The study attempted to answer questions related to higher education in Kenya. The questions investigated were (1) how had the characteristics of higher education curriculum changed since 1975?; (2) in what ways had the purposes of higher education in Kenya changed since 1975?; (3) to what extent have these purposes been achieved? why or why not?; and (4) which events since 1975 had a major impact on higher education in Kenya? The major analysis of the study is historical and gives an explanation of the history of the development of higher education in the colonial days in Kenya, briefly discussing the period 1963-75. The analysis of Kenyan institutions of higher education covers the development of Kenyan higher education since 1975. The discussion consists of basic facts of Kenyan higher education. Data from primary and secondary sources were analyzed and studied. Documents were chronologically and topically reviewed. Chapter I of the study is the introduction. The history of higher education is in Chapter II. Chapter III discusses the impact of Western education in Kenya. Chapter IV deals with development, politics, and Kenyan higher education. Chapter V contains the summary, a discussion, and conclusions based on the facts presented in Chapters I through IV. Since 1975, higher education in Kenya has emphasized vocational and technical education, African culture, natural sciences, and rural development.
Date: August 1988
Creator: Munywoki, Mathenge
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Study of Educational Reform Legislation, Extracurricular Activities, and No-Pass, No-Play in Texas House Bill 72

Description: The problem of the study was to ascertain the perceptions of high school personnel and students regarding the effectiveness and implementation of the educational reforms and the No-Pass, No-Play section in Texas House Bill 72 and compare them to changes in reported student academic performances. Questionnaires were mailed to a stratified random sample of fifteen high schools in Texas. Six persons were asked to respond at each school. The sample consisted of ninety participants. In addition, each school provided forty student grade profiles, twenty from 1984 and twenty from 1986. The instrument, "Questionnaire on Texas Educational Reform Legislation, Extracurricular Activities and No-Pass, No-Play," had eighteen questions. Questions one and two provided demographic data for the study. Questions three through eighteen assessed the perceptions of high school personnel and students regarding educational reforms and the "No-Pass, No-Play" rules. Hypotheses one through four used chi-square Tests of Independence to determine the significance among variables. Hypothesis five used a t value to measure the comparison of the grade-point averages from 1984 and 1986. Hypothesis six compared the result of hypothesis five and a z value generated from a comparison of a percentage of participant responses and the neutral value. The findings were that of 120 chi-square calculations only ten showed significance for 8.3 percent of the total. There were no significant differences found among the variables regarding the questions asked. There was a significant difference in what study participants thought about students' achievement and the actual differences in the student grade-point averages. A major conclusion was that the participants believed that students were achieving more academically since Texas House Bill 72 and "No-Pass, No-Play." In summary there were six findings, eleven conclusions, seven general recommendations, eight specific recommendations and six recommendations for further study reported as a result of this research.
Date: August 1988
Creator: Westmoreland, James Larry
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Manager as a Source of Departmental Power in a Manufacturing Company

Description: The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between position-related sources of power and person-related sources of power in organizations. The subject is the power of an organizational sub-unit compared to other units. Theory on the structural sources of power is well established in the literature. The question in this study is whether the individual manager, the person, is another major source of power for the organizational unit. A major objective of the study is to fill this gap in the literature on power in organizations. A secondary objective of this study is to see if one can rank the individual position-related sources of power and person-related sources of power, identified through a literature review, within each group in terms of their relative importance. The type of this study is exploratory. It is a descriptive study explaining the "what is" about the relationship between position and person sources of power in a manufacturing company. Results indicate that there is a two-way relationship between manager power and department power, and that one can rank order the sources of power in terms of their contribution to a department's or manager's power. Power is defined in this study as the ability to get things done.
Date: August 1988
Creator: Nasif, Ercan G. (Ercan Gultekin)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Personality and Behavioral Correlates of Autonomic Imbalance

Description: Individual differences in autonomic nervous system responsiveness have been linked to a variety of physical disorders and personality and behavioral tendencies. The present study attempted to correlate specific personality characteristics hypothesized to be associated with either sympathetic or parasympathetic dominance based on the work of M. A. Wenger. The Clinical Analysis Questionnaire Personality Inventory, a physical disorders questionnaire, a self-report stress measure, and seven psychophysiologic tests were administered to 60 undergraduate students in an introductory psychology class at North Texas State University. The results provided limited support for the hypotheses. A skewed population with 50 of the 60 subjects achieving scores indicative of sympathetic dominance occurred. Statistical comparison (t-tests) of the CAQ personality traits, and clinical factor scores of these 50 subjects labeled sympathetic dominant with CAQ norms for college students revealed means on five personality traits and three clinical factors were significantly different for the sympathetic dominant group at the .05 or greater level of significance. These findings were interpreted as limited support for Wenger's work and for the positions of Acker and Kagan that individuals with more reactive sympathetic nervous systems tend to have difficulty binding anxiety, poor emotional controls and outlets, ambivalence about interpersonal relationships, and a need for group acceptance.
Date: August 1988
Creator: Sawyer, Judy
Partner: UNT Libraries

Correlational Study of the UNT Neuropsych-Screen, the MMPI and Time among Chronic Pain Patients

Description: Although many theorists have speculated that chronic pain may be linked to some sort of central neuropsychological integration deficit, a review of the current literature reveals no empirical support for this theory. This study attempts to assess the severity, if any, of neuropsychological deficits in chronic pain subjects by using a neuropsychological screen developed at the University of North Texas. Also, presented are studies of correlations between the UNT Neuropsych-screen and the MMPI. the Dallas Pain Questionnaire (DPQ), the Dallas Pain Drawing CDPD), and time since injury in order to assess any possible relationships. The subjects in this study consist of 100 volunteers. Of these subjects, 74 were patients of the Spinal and Chronic Pain Center at Medical Arts Hospital in Dallas, Texas and represented the clinical population. The remaining 26 subjects were staff volunteers from the hospital . The results of the study indicate significant differences between chronic pain subjects and non-pain subjects across many areas of neuropsychological functioning, as well as other significant correlations among many of the variables. The implications of this study are elaborated upon, in the discussion section, in detail along with limitations and future research directions.
Date: June 1989
Creator: Smith, Russell Joseph
Partner: UNT Libraries