UNT Theses and Dissertations - 18,578 Matching Results

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Effectiveness of Group Supervision Versus Combined Group and Individual Supervision with Masters-Level Counselor Trainees

Description: This study was designed to investigate the effectiveness of large group supervision, small group supervision, and combined group and individual supervision on counselor trainees. Specifically, instruments were used to measure the progress in counselor efficacy and counselor development. Analyses of Covariance revealed that all supervision formats produced similar progress in counselor effectiveness and counselor development. Large group supervision, small group supervision, and combined group and individual supervision appear to be equivalent in their effectiveness.
Date: August 1998
Creator: Ray, Dee C. (Deanne Castleberry)
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Effectiveness of Homeschool Collegiate Preparation: Four Alumni's Perceptions

Description: This qualitative study seeks to assess the effectiveness of homeschool collegiate preparation through the eyes of homeschool alumni. Four alumni who are current college students participated in the study. A triangulation of methods, which included surveys, open-ended questionnaires, and interviews, ensured reliability and validity. Although the students represented a wide range of varied homeschool experiences, the perceptions of all the students were that their environments prepared them for collegiate-level work at levels that are above average.
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Date: August 2001
Creator: Bryant,Cynthia T.
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Effectiveness of Hybrid Problem-Based Learning versus Manual-Based Learning in the Microbiology Laboratory

Description: Promising results from the use of problem-based learning (PBL) as a teaching method in medical programs have encouraged many institutions to incorporate PBL into their curricula. This study investigates how applying hybrid-PBL (H-PBL) in a microbiology laboratory impacts students' higher-order thinking as compared to applying a lecture-based pedagogy. The experimental design compared the learning outcomes of two groups of students: the control group and the H-PBL group, for whom PBL cases comprised 30% of the curriculum. Both groups were taught basic skills for the microbiology lab by the same instructor. Using the traditional teaching style for the control group, the instructor offered each student what they needed for their experiments. The H-PBL group practiced experimental design, data analysis, theory proposal, and created research questions by using six study cases that were closely linked to the area of study. The outcome was measured using a pre- and post- assessment consisting of 24 questions that was designed by following Bloom's taxonomy of learning levels. A one-way ANOVA was used to analyze the data. The results showed that for the first three levels of Bloom's taxonomy— knowledge, comprehension, and application—there were no statistically significant differences between the H-PBL and control group gain scores as determined by a one-way ANOVA. For the knowledge level, f (1, 78) = .232, and p = .632; for the comprehension level, f (1, 78) = .004, and p = .951; and for the application level f (1, 78) =. 028, and p =.863. On the other hand, the gain scores for the three higher levels—analysis, evaluation, and creativity—improved for the H-PBL group. The analysis level showed statistically significant differences, with f (1, 78) = 4.012, and p = .049. Also, there were statistically significant differences in students' performance at the evaluation level, with f (1, 78) = 11.495, ...
Date: May 2017
Creator: Alharbi, Najwa
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Effectiveness of Institutionalization of a Curricular Change in Department of Defense Dependents' Schools

Description: In this study factors which affect the degree of implementation of a curricular change were examined to determine how well a specific curricular change was implemented in relation to the original intent. The change, Developmentally Appropriate Practice, was implemented in Department of Defense Dependents Schools, Germany Region, beginning in school year 1991-1992 in grades kindergarten through two. During school year 1993-1994, grade three began the transition to Developmentally Appropriate Practice. Several factors which influence teacher behavior during the implementation process were investigated to determine if there is a correlation between those factors and degree of implementation, the dependent variable. The independent variables in this study were school culture; administrators' leadership effectiveness; teacher concerns about the implementation; and teacher characteristics including age, years teaching experience, years experience in Department of Defense Dependents' Schools, and training. The degree of implementation, the dependent variable, was defined in terms of the extent to which teachers had changed their behavior to become congruent with behavior required by the change. Teachers were identified as high, moderate, or low implementers, based on classroom observations. One purpose of the study was to increase understanding of implementation by analyzing the factors which affect the behavior of teachers in the change process. A second purpose of the study was to add to the body of research that explains why so many educational changes fail to become established practice. To establish interobserver reliability, two observers rated teachers using the same protocol. The interobserver reliability coefficient found was reported at .9820. The participants in the study completed the Stages of Concern Questionnaire, the Administrative Effectiveness Survey, the School Culture Survey, and a demographic survey. The results were correlated with the Early Childhood Classroom Observation form. Amount of training was found to have a statistically significant positive relationship with degree of implementation (p=.006). ...
Date: December 1995
Creator: Colvin, Janet D. (Janet Delores)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Effectiveness of microcounseling as a supervisory model for teaching interviewing skills

Description: This study dealt with the problem of training selected basic interviewing skills to beginning counselors. The purposes of this investigation were 1) to assess the effectiveness of microcounseling for training the skills of open-ended questioning and verbal minimal encouraging; 2) to assess the influence of microcounseling on counselor verbal participation; 3) to determine whether training in these skills via the microcounseling model will generalize to the actual counseling setting and be maintained over time; and, 4) to determine whether microcounseling is a practical method of teaching therapy skills to practicum students.
Date: August 1976
Creator: Arnold, Bill R.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Effectiveness of microcounseling procedures in the training of play therapists

Description: The thrust of this study was to adapt the microcounseling paradigm to the skills utilized in play therapy. The basic problem was to teach prepracticum master's level counseling students three skills necessary to successful play therapy: limit setting, reflection of behavior statements, and reflection of feeling statements.
Date: August 1976
Creator: Arnold, J. Steven
Partner: UNT Libraries

Effectiveness of on-line corpus research in L2 writing: Investigation of proficiency in English writing through independent error correction.

Description: Second language (L2) researchers and teachers have increasingly come to believe that using a computer-based corpus can be extremely helpful in the language classroom. The purpose of this study is to examine whether corpora can be used outside of the classroom in order for students to improve their essays independently. No previous study has tried to examine students' essays in relation to corpus use so that this study is exploratory. Seven international students wrote five essays on specific topics and then corrected their errors through corpus research. Two experiments were conducted with different students and followed three steps: receiving information about how to use the BYU COCA, writing and correcting, and interviews with students. I examined quantitatively the number and types of errors that students were able to correct in two experiments and reported qualitatively on students' interview responses.
Date: December 2009
Creator: Kim, Yu-Jeung
Partner: UNT Libraries

Effectiveness of Play Therapy on Problem Behaviors of Children with Intellectual Disabilities: A Single Subject Design

Description: A growing disparity between the mental health needs of children and their lack of treatment served as the basis of this study. To address this existent gap, I proposed that child-centered play therapy (CCPT), a holistic treatment that fosters children's emotional, developmental, and social growth would serve as a viable treatment. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of CCPT on problem behaviors among children identified with an intellectual disability. Specifically, a single case, A-B-A design (N = 2) was used to examine changes in participant's problem behaviors as measured on the Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC) across conditions. Trained raters used the ABC to rate participant's problem behaviors 3 times per week during the course of this study. Participants completed 2 weeks of a no-intervention phase, 5 weeks of play therapy 3 times per week, and 2 weeks of a no-intervention maintenance phase. Additionally, participants were administered the Gesell Developmental Observation to assess their maturational age during the baseline and maintenance phases. Parents also completed the ABC during two intervals: baseline phase, and maintenance phase. Analysis of results indicated that problem behaviors decreased for both participants. Results from the percent of non-overlapping data (PND), an indice for effect size further revealed that play therapy was a very effective treatment for participants. Follow-up interviews suggested that play therapy is a viable intervention for children with intellectual disabilities and problem behaviors. Clinical observations and implications for future research are presented.
Date: May 2011
Creator: Swan, Karrie L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Effectiveness of Programmed Vocabulary Instruction in an Undergraduate Collegiate Business Communications Course

Description: This study evaluates the effectiveness of programed vocabulary instruction in an undergraduate collegiate business communications course. In making its evaluation, the study tests the hypothesis that a class using such instruction would improve over a class without formal vocabulary study. The three areas of proficiency measured are written communication, vocabulary, and reading comprehension.
Date: August 1972
Creator: Burnett, Mary Joyce
Partner: UNT Libraries

Effectiveness of Relational Equine-Partnered Counseling (REPC) on Reduction of Symptoms of PTSD in Military Veterans: a Single Case Design

Description: There is currently a crisis in military veteran mental health care. At 5-30% of veterans receive a PTSD diagnosis. Veterans face a large gap that exists in accessing and receiving high quality care. One intervention that is becoming more popular is equine assisted counseling (EAC). The purpose of the present study was to examine the effectiveness of Relational Equine-Partnered Counseling (REPC) in reducing symptoms of PTSD in military veterans. I also examined specific PTSD symptom clusters including intrusion, avoidance, negative alterations in cognitions and mood, and alterations in arousal and reactivity. The present study utilized a single-case design consisting of a baseline phase, intervention phase, and post-intervention phase. Participants included four military veterans presenting for war zone-related PTSD: four males and one female, aged 32-67 years, two White/European non-Hispanic, one African American non-Hispanic, and one mixed ethnicity. Symptoms were assessed weekly using the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale and the PTSD Checklist (PCL-5). The data were analyzed by visual analysis and statistical effect size. The results were mixed across the participants. All participants experienced decreased means between the baseline and intervention phases. However, interpretation of the results indicated that the intervention was effective in some areas for some of the participants. All participants reported that the intervention was beneficial in targeting specific symptoms. Overall, the results indicated that REPC may have some benefit in reducing distress related to PTSD. More research is needed to further explore the effectiveness of REPC on the reduction of PTSD-related distress.
Date: August 2015
Creator: Sheade, Hallie E.
Partner: UNT Libraries

The effectiveness of Say It Straight communications training with adults in outpatient chemical dependency treatment

Description: This study compared an experimental group who participated in weekly Say It Straight (SIS) sessions as an adjunct to existing treatment protocols for a period of 6-8 weeks, to a control group who matriculated in treatment without the addition of SIS training for a period of 6-8 weeks.
Date: May 1999
Creator: Hardy, Rebecca B. (Rebecca Biggerstaff)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Effectiveness of Secondary Reinforcement on the Behavior of a Hyperactive Child

Description: The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the effectiveness of various secondary reinforcers on the behavior of a hyperactive child. A base rate of appropriate behavior was obtained in a first-grade classroom. The operant techniques employed were secondary reinforcers consisting of monetary reinforcement; monetary paired with peer reinforcement; monetary, peer, and verbal reinforcement combined; and verbal reinforcement only.
Date: May 1973
Creator: Payton, Tommy I.
Partner: UNT Libraries

The effectiveness of selected case-finding approaches in locating handicapped individuals residing in areas with specified demographic characteristics

Description: The problem of this study was the examination of selected case-finding approaches for locating handicapped individuals. It was designed to (1) determine the rank order of effectiveness of selected case-finding approaches, within specific census tracts, in locating handicapped individuals aged three to to twenty-one years inclusive, (2) to project the most effective case-finding approach within census tract areas with specified factors of mean income, median education level, and primary home language, and (3) to determine the probability of locating handicapped individuals by a case-finding approach other than the one determined to be the most effective.
Date: May 1977
Creator: Atkinson, Catherine N.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Effectiveness of Short-Term Group Guidance with a Group of Transfer Students Admitted on Academic Probation

Description: The problem of this study was to determine the effectiveness of short-term group guidance in improving the academic achievement of transfer students admitted to North Texas State University on scholastic probation. In addition to the primary problem, an analysis was made of the differences in changes in certain psychological needs, as measured by the Edwards Personal Preference Schedule, between academically successful and unsuccessful students. Changes in these psychological needs were determined for students who participated in group guidance sessions and compared with changes made by a group of students who did not participate in group guidance. The relationship between these need changes and grade-point average was studied for these students. A comparison of the number of drop-outs was made between students who participated in group guidance sessions and students who did not participate.
Date: August 1962
Creator: Maroney, Kenneth Austin
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Effectiveness of Sociometric Grouping in Improving the Social Status of Rejected Girls in Eighth-grade Homemaking Classes

Description: The purpose of the present study is to determine the effectiveness of sociometric groupings in bringing about improved social status of rejected girls in eighth-grade homemaking classes. Specifically, the study seeks to answer to the questions: Do significant changes occur in personal and social adjustment when pupils are placed in groups according to their choice? Is there evidence of improved social status of rejected pupils when sociometric groupings are used throughout the year?
Date: August 1953
Creator: Bissell, Mary Elvira
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Effectiveness of Speech Recognition as a User Interface for Computer-Based Training

Description: Some researchers are saying that natural language is probably one of the most promising interfaces for use in the long term for simplicity of learning. If this is true, then it follows that speech recognition would be ideal as the interface for computer-based training (CBT). While many speech recognition applications are being used as a means for a computer interface, these are usually confined to controlling the computer or causing the computer to control other devices. The user input or interface has been the recipient of a strong effort to improve the quality of the communication between man and machine and is proposed to be a dominant factor in determining user productivity, performance, and satisfaction. However, other researchers note that full natural interfaces with computers are still a long way from being the state-of-the art with technology. The focus of this study was to determine if the technology of speech recognition is an effective interface for an academic lesson presented via CBT. How does one determine if learning has been affected and how is this measured? Previous research has attempted quantify a learning effect when using a variety of interfaces. This dissertation summarizes previous studies using other interfaces and those using speech recognition. It attempted to apply a framework used to measure learning effectiveness in some of these studies to quantify the measurement of learning when speech recognition is used as the sole interface. The focus of the study was on cognitive processing which affects short-term memory and in-turn, the effect on original learning (OL). The methods and procedures applied in an experimental study were presented.
Date: August 1995
Creator: Creech, Wayne E. (Wayne Everette)
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Effectiveness of Substance use Measures in the Detection of Denial and Partial Denial

Description: Many substance users deny their substance use to avoid negative consequences, thus diluting the accuracy of assessment. To address this issue, indirect items are often included on substance use measures to identify those who deny their use. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of complete denial and partial denial on substance use measures. Partial denial, also termed denial of effects, is the denial of substance use interfering in multiple domains of a person's functioning. The study used a mixed within- and between-subjects design with participants from a dual diagnosis inpatient unit. Each participant completed the study under two different conditions which include an honest condition and an experimental condition (either complete denial or partial denial). Results show that partial denial is distinctly different from complete denial across three self-report substance use measures. Importantly, substance users engaging in these denial conditions were often undetected by these measures.
Date: May 2011
Creator: Wooley, Chelsea Nichole
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Effectiveness of Teacher Observed Behavioral and Academic Traits as Predictors of Reading Difficulty in a Third Grade Population

Description: The objective of this study was to determine the predictive efficacy of teacher assessments of behavioral and academic traits thought highly associated with reading difficulty, and to single out from teacher assessments those most effective for prediction.
Date: January 1968
Creator: Mahaffey, Mary Kathleen
Partner: UNT Libraries