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Base Effects on the Thermal Decomposition of Sec-butyllithium Solutions

Description: The pyrolysis of sec-butyllithium in solution was studied in an attempt to understand the loss of stereo-specificity and the atypical kinetics that have been reported. Additionally, the effect of added lithium alkoxides was studied to determine their effects on the highly reactive sec-butyllithium substrate.
Date: June 1966
Creator: Adams, George Michael
Partner: UNT Libraries

Biological Inhibitors

Description: Four isosteric series of plant growth-regulating compounds were prepared. Using an Avena sativa coleptile assay system, derivatives in series I and IV inhibited segment elongation to a greater degree than did comparable derivatives in series II and III.
Date: December 1971
Creator: Sargent, Dale Roger
Partner: UNT Libraries

Bonding Studies in Group IV Substituted n,n-dimethylanilines

Description: The purpose of the present work is to study the effects of the trimethylsilyl and trimethylgermyl substituents on the N,N-dimethylamino ring system. Both ground and excited state interactions were studied and their magnitudes determined. The experimental data were then used in conjunction with molecular orbital calculations to differentiate among, and determine the importance of, d-p bonding, hyperconjugation or polarization of the trimethylsilyl group on the ground and excited state bonding.
Date: December 1971
Creator: Drews, Michael James
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Carbon-13 and Lithium-6 NMR Study of Alkyllithium Compounds

Description: A variable temperature 13C and 6Li NMR study has been conducted for 6Li-enriched ethyl-, n-propyl-, isopropyl-, n-butyl-, isobutyl-, t-butyl--, isopentyl-, 2-ethylbutyl-, and n-hexyllithium in cyclopentane. Significant differences in the 13C NMR parameters are observed as a function of the alkyl group and temperature. These changes are compared to the 6Li spectra and explained in terms of the aggregates present. 13C-6Li coupling is readily observed in both the 13 6 C and Li spectra of compounds which contain branching at either the alpha or beta carbons of the alkyl group. This coupling has been used to identify the aggregates present in solution and to identify the fluxional behavior of these aggregates.
Date: December 1983
Creator: Jensen, Randy M.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Characterization of Ionic Liquid As a Charge Carrier for the Detection of Neutral Organometallic Complexes Using Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

Description: A novel application of ionic liquid as a charge carrier for the analysis and detection of neutral organometallic complexes using a mass spectrometer has been presented. The mass spectrometer detects only charged compounds which raise a difficulty in analyzing a neutral molecule that lacks a basic site to associate with charge. Therefore, an effective way of providing charge has always been an area of keen interest in the field of mass spectrometry. Ionic liquids have a very fascinating property of forming a cation-? interaction with other molecules to give a charged complex. In order to take advantage of this, it is important to know the geometric structure of the complex. Advanced methodologies like hydrogen-deuterium exchange and computational calculations have been used assisting in better understanding of the structure of the ionic liquid complexes.
Date: August 2012
Creator: Joshi, Ubisha
Partner: UNT Libraries

Characterization of Low Barrier Hydrogen Bonds in Enzyme Catalysis: an Ab Initio and DFT Investigation

Description: Hartree-Fock, Moller-Plesset, and density functional theory calculations have been carried out using 6-31+G(d), 6-31+G(d,p) and 6-31++G(d,p) basis sets to study the properties of low-barrier or short-strong hydrogen bonds (SSHB) and their potential role in enzyme-catalyzed reactions that involve proton abstraction from a weak carbon-acid by a weak base. Formic acid/formate anion, enol/enolate and other complexes have been chosen to simulate a SSHB system. These complexes have been calculated to form very short, very short hydrogen bonds with a very low barrier for proton transfer from the donor to the acceptor. Two important environmental factors including small amount of solvent molecules that could possibly exist at the active site of an enzyme and the polarity around the active site were simulated to study their energetic and geometrical influences to a SSHB. It was found that microsolvation that improves the matching of pK as of the hydrogen bond donor and acceptor involved in the SSHB will always increase the interaction of the hydrogen bond; microsolvation that disrupts the matching of pKas, on the other hand, will lead to a weaker SSHB. Polarity surrounding the SSHB, simulated by SCRF-SCIPCM model, can significantly reduce the strength and stability of a SSHB. The residual strength of a SSHB is about 10--11 kcal/mol that is still significantly stable compared with a traditional weak hydrogen bond that is only about 3--5 kcal/mol in any cases. These results indicate that SSHB can exist under polar environment. Possible reaction intermediates and transition states for the reaction catalyzed by ketosteroid isomerase were simulated to study the stabilizing effect of a SSHB on intermediates and transition states. It was found that at least one SSHB is formed in each of the simulated intermediate-catalyst complexes, strongly supporting the LBHB mechanism proposed by Cleland and Kreevoy. Computational results on the activation energy for ...
Date: August 1999
Creator: Pan, Yongping
Partner: UNT Libraries

Chemical Cleavage of Human Phosphoglucose Isomerase at Cysteine

Description: The present study has resulted in the development of a procedure for the specific chemical fragmentation of human phosphoglucose isomerase into a minimal number of peptides. A two-cycle procedure for cleaving the protein with 2-nitro-5- thiocyanobenzoic acid results in four primary peptides and three overlap peptides. The peptides can be readily separated on the basis of their size by using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Preliminary peptide alignments have been considered, and amino acid analyses have been performed. End-terminal analyses of the enzyme revealed a carboxyl terminal sequence of Asp-Val-Gln and a blocked amino terminus. The cysteine cleavage procedure provides an excellent method for the identification and location of specific genetic mutations of human phosphoglucose isomerase.
Date: December 1975
Creator: Conn, Worth R.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Chemical Equilibria in Binary Solvents

Description: Dissertation research involves development of Mobile Order Theory thermodynamic models to mathematically describe and predict the solubility, spectral properties, protonation equilibrium constants and two-phase partitioning behavior of solutes dissolved in binary solvent mixtures of analytical importance. Information gained provide a better understanding of solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interactions at the molecular level, which will facilitate the development of better chemical separation methods based upon both gas-liquid and high-performance liquid chromatography, and better analysis methods based upon complexiometric and spectroscopic methods. Dissertation research emphasizes chemical equilibria in systems containing alcohol cosolvents with the understanding that knowledge gained will be transferable to more environmentally friendly aqueous-organic solvent mixtures.
Date: August 1997
Creator: McHale, Mary E. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Chemical, Physical, and Biological Investigation of the Total Suspended and Dissolved Substances in Lake Dallas with Emphasis on Sanitation

Description: The purpose of this investigation is to determine the suspended organic matter and the total phosphorus in the waters of Lake Dallas and to evaluate these findings. Since organic matter floating in lakes is largely composed of minute plants, animals, and detritus derived from animals and plants, the fertilizing effect of phosphorus must be considered as an integral part of this problem.
Date: 1942
Creator: Eads, Ewin A.
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Chlorination of Amino Acid in Municipal Waste Effluents

Description: In model reaction systems to test amino acids in chlorinated waste effluents, several amino acids were chlorinated at high chlorine doses. (2000-4000 mg/1). Amino acids present in municipal waste effluents before and after chlorination were concentrated and purified using cation exchange and Chelex resins. After concentration and cleanup of the samples, the amino acids were derivatized by esterification of the acid functional groups and acylation of the amine groups. Identification and quantification of the amino acids and chlorination products was carried out by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, using a digital computer data system. Analysis of the waste products revealed the presence of new carbon-chlorine bonded derivatives of the amino acid tyrosine when the effluents were treated with heavy doses of chlorine.
Date: July 1977
Creator: Burleson, Jimmie L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Chromatographic and Spectroscopic Studies on Aquatic Fulvic Acid

Description: High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) was used to investigate the utility of this technique for the analytical and preparative separation of components of aquatic fulvic acids (FA). Three modes of HPLC namely adsorption, anion exchange and reversed phase were evaluated. Aquatic fulvic acids were either extracted from surface water and sediment samples collected from the Southwest of the U.S., or were provided in a high purity form from the USGS. On the adsorption mode, a major fraction of aquatic fulvic acid was isolated on a semipreparative scale and subjected to Carbon-13 NMR and FAB Mass Spectroscopy. Results indicated that (1) The analyzed fraction of fulvic acid contains more aliphatic than aromatic moieties; (2) Methoxy, carboxylic acids, and esters are well-defined moieties of the macromolecule; (3) Phenolic components of the macromolecules were not detected in the Carbon-13 NMR spectrum possibly because of the presence of stable free radicals. Results of the anion exchange mode have shown that at least three types of acidic functionalities in aquatic fulvic acid can be separated. Results also indicated that aquatic fulvic acid can be progressively fractionated by using subsequent modes of HPLC. Results of reversed phase mode have shown that (1) The fractionation of aquatic fulvic acid by RP-HPLC is essentially controlled by the polarity and/or pH of the carrier solvent system; (2) Under different RP-HPLC conditions aquatic fulvic acid from several locations are fractionated into the same major components; (3) Fulvic acid extracted from water and sediment from the same site are more similar than those extracted from different sites; (4) Cationic and anionic ion pair reagents indicated the presence of amphoteric compounds within the polymeric structure of fulvic acid. Each mode of HPLC provided a characteristic profile of fulvic acid. The results of this research provided basic information on the behavior of aquatic ...
Date: August 1986
Creator: Chang, David Juan-Yuan
Partner: UNT Libraries

Combined Electrochemistry and Spectroscopy of Complexes and Supramolecules containing Bipyridyl and Other Azabiphenyl Building Blocks

Description: A group of azabiphenyl complexes and supramolecules, and their reduced and oxidized forms when possible, were characterized by cyclic voltammetry and electronic absorption spectroscopy. The oxidized and reduced species, if sufficiently stable, were further generated electrochemically inside a specially designed quartz cell with optically transparent electrode, so that the spectra of the electrochemically generated species could be taken in situ. Assignments were proposed for both parent and product electronic spectra. Species investigated included a range of Ru(II) and Pt(II) complexes, as well as catenanes and their comparents. Using the localized electronic model, the electrochemical reduction can be in most cases assigned as azabiphenyl-based, and the oxidation as transition metal-based. This is consistent with the fact that the azabiphenyl compounds have a low lying π* orbital. The electronic absorption spectra of the compounds under study are mainly composed of π —> π* bands with, in some cases, charge transfer bands also.
Date: August 1995
Creator: Yang, Lei
Partner: UNT Libraries

Comparison of Homework Systems (Four Web-Based) used in First-Semester General Chemistry

Description: Web-based homework systems are becoming more common in general chemistry as instructors face ever-increasing enrollment. Yet providing meaningful feedback on assignments remains of the utmost importance. Chemistry instructors consider completion of homework integral to students' success in chemistry, yet only a few studies have compared the use of Web-based systems to the traditional paper-and-pencil homework within general chemistry. This study compares the traditional homework system to four different Web-based systems. Data from eight, semester classes consisting of a diagnostic pre-test, final semester grades, and the number of successful and unsuccessful students are analyzed. Statistically significant results suggest a chemistry instructor should carefully consider options when selecting a homework system.
Date: May 2009
Creator: Belland, Joshua
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Comparison of the Achievements of Science and Non-Science Majors Enrolled in General Chemistry at North Texas State College

Description: It is the specific purpose of this investigation to determine the difference, if any, in the amount of practical, everyday chemistry learned by the science majors as opposed to the non-science majors enrolled in general chemistry at the North Texas State College during the school year 1950-1951.
Date: 1951
Creator: Brogdon, Billie R.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Computational Studies of Bonding and Phosphorescent Properties of Group 12 Oligomers and Extended Excimers.

Description: Density functional (ca, BLYP, BPW91, B3LYP and B3PW91), MP2 and CCSD(T) methods in combination with LANL2DZ or cc-pVxZ-PP (where x=D(double), T(triple) Q(quadruple), and 5(quintuple)) basis sets have been employed in computing electronic transition energies of zinc and cadmium monomers. CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pV5Z-PP combination finds values that are 150 cm-1 from the experimental value for the zinc monomer and 240 cm-1 remove from the cadmium monomer excitation experimental value. These method/basis set combinations are also used to find spectroscopic values (re, De, we, wexe, Be , and Te) that rival experimental values for dimers and excimers. Examples of this can be seen with the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pV5Z-PP combination phosphorescent emission results. The values found are within 120 cm-1 of the zinc emission energy and 290 cm-1 of the cadmium emission energy. While this combination rigorously models spectroscopic constants for monomers, dimers, and excimers, it does not efficiently model these constants for larger clusters with available modern computational resources. It is important to show spectroscopic trends (bonding, phosphorescent excitation and emissions) as clusters increase as the monomer and dimer emission energies do not model solid state metallophilic interactions and phosphorescence. The MP2/LANL2DZ combinations show qualitative cooperative bonding trends in group oligomers and extended excimers as size increases and shape change. Changes in excitation and emission energies are also shown as a function of size and shape of the clusters.
Date: August 2008
Creator: Determan, John J.
Partner: UNT Libraries