UNT Theses and Dissertations - 687 Matching Results

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The Synecology of Phyco-Periphyton in Oligotrophic Lakes

Description: This study is designed to (a) demonstrate the highly productive nature of the littoral area as compared to the pelagic region, (b) the possible importance of phyco-periphyton in the diets of fish, (c) the effects of meteorological conditions on distribution of phytoplankton, and (d) a demonstration of the invalidity of using artificial substrates as a universal means of measuring productivity.
Date: May 1964
Creator: Foerster, John W.
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Effects of Long Term Moderate Ethanol Intake on the Immune Response in Rats

Description: Using a rat model, the effects of a single dose or six to twelve months of daily oral administration of ethanol on the immune system were determined. The rats were challenged with sheep red blood cells after the various dosing periods to elicit an immune response. Immune system responsiveness was determined by means of white blood cell counts and differentials, antibody titers, and T-cell numbers. No deleterious effects of the ethanol on the immune response were seen, while the female alcohol-fed rats showed a significant increase in T-Cell numbers, white blood cell counts, and lymphocytes over the sham group.
Date: August 1991
Creator: Follin, Cynthia A. (Cynthia Ann)
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Effect of Carbon Monoxide on the Growth of an Aquatic Streptomycete

Description: The major purpose of this investigation was to determine the effect of carbon monoxide on the development of various morphological phases of a single isolate of the aquatic streptomycetes and to elucidate the physiological differences between terminal respiration in the primary and secondary stages. A secondary purpose was to repeat the work of Michael Lee Higgins involving the effect of anaerobiosis on the growth of the organism.
Date: August 1966
Creator: Francisco, Donald Edward
Partner: UNT Libraries

Spatial and Temporal Influences of Water Quality on Zooplankton in Lake Texoma

Description: Seventy-one aquatic species including the copepodids and nauplii were identified from Lake Texoma from August 1996 to September 1997. Zooplankton community structure, abundance and spatial and temporal distributions were compared among five lake zones delineated a priori based on chloride concentration. The zones, in order of decreasing chloride concentration, are the Red River zone (RRZ), Red river Transition zone (RRTZ), Main Lake zone (MLZ), Washita River Transition zone (WRTZ) and Washita River zone (WRZ). Bray Curtis Similarity Index showed community structure was most similar in the two Red River arm zones, the two Washita River arm zones and the MLZ. Zooplankton abundance was greatest in the Red River arm (312 org/L), intermediate in the Washita River arm (217 org/L) and least in the Main Lake body (103 org/L). A significant increase in the abundance of a deformed rotifer, Keratella cochlearis, was observed mainly in the Red River arm during a second study from March 1999 to June 1999. Seasonal dynamics, rather than spatial dynamics, were more important in structuring the zooplankton community, especially in the two river arms. Spatial variance was solely attributed to station and zone effects independent of time for a few crustacean species and many of the water quality parameters supporting the presence of longitudinal gradients of differing water quality. Three independent models (Red River arm, Washita River arm, Main Lake body) rather than a single model for the entire reservoir, best describe patterns in the zooplankton community and its relationship to seasonal, physical and chemical factors. Statistical power, sample size and taxonomic resolution were examined. When monitoring seasonal and annuals trends in abundance, the greatest statistical power was achieved by analyzing count data at taxonomic levels above genus. Taxonomic sufficiency was assessed to determine if costs could be reduced for zooplankton identifications. For water quality monitoring ...
Date: May 2000
Creator: Franks, Jessica L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Spring Food Habits of Corydalus Cornutus L. in the Brazos River, Texas

Description: The objective of this study was to determine the kinds and numbers of food organisms consumed by Corydalus cornutus, and to investigate its periodicity of feeding during the spring months in the Brazos River, Palo Pinto County, Texas. A total of 468 larvae were collected at two-week intervals from February 29 to May 14, 1971. Larvae were taken at opportunity during three periods of the day, 6am.-12pm., 12pm.-6pm., and 6pm.-12am. A total of 23 different food items was observed in the 121 stomachs containing food. An expedient method of dissection of the digestive tract is included.
Date: August 1971
Creator: Friday, Gary P.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Respiratory Responses in the Freshwater Snail (Pomacea Bridgesii) are Differently Affected by Temperature , Body Mass,and Oxygen Avalability

Description: Pomacea bridgesii is a snail species native to tropical and sub-tropical regions, where it usually faces variability in water, temperature and oxygen level. This study of the effect of temperature on mass-specific oxygen consumption (ṀO2) and its relation to body weight shows that the ṀO2 of juvenile snails in normoxia (18-21 kPa) acclimated at temperature of 25°C ranged from 5 to 58 µMol O2/g/h, with a mean of 41.4 ± 18.3 µMol O2/g/h (n=7). Adult snails in normoxia at 25°C show less variation, ranging from 13 to 23 µMol O2/g/h , with a mean of 24.4± 6.1 µMol O2/g/h (n=12). The Q10 value for juvenile snails was higher in the interval 25-30°C (Q 10=5.74) than in the interval 20-25°C (Q10= 0.286). In adult snails, Q10 was higher in the interval 20-25°C (Q10=3.19). ṀO2 of P. bridgesii in relation to body weight showed a negative linear correlation between metabolic rate and body weight with b values between 0.23 and 0.76. Also, both juvenile and adult snails exhibited weak O2 regulation. In general, the different respiratory characteristics between juvenile and adult snails might be related to the differences of individual life history, which caused them to perform differently in face of temperatures change. Additionally, Pomacean snails species originated in tropical habitats where there is a lack of thermal fluctuation. For this reason, Pomacean snails may be less likely to have evolved effective thermal acclimation capabilities.
Date: August 2016
Creator: Frifer, Wenasa Salem
Partner: UNT Libraries

Food Habits of Stoneflies (Plecoptera) in the Gunnison and Dolores Rivers, Colorado

Description: Gut contents of 2,500 stonefly nymphs, comprising 10 species, from the Gunnison and Dolores Rivers, Colorado were examined from Dec., 1974-Oct., 1975. Perlidae species were carnivorous feeding primarily on chironomids, mayflies and caddisflies. Seasonal patterns of ingestion and preference varied among species and predator sizes and between rivers. Early instar polyphagous species utilized detritus in the fall, eventually shifting to carnivorous habits as they grew through winter-spring. Pteronarcids fed predominantly on detritus. Dietary overlap of predators was greatest in the Gunnison River, with subtle mechanisms such as prey species and size selectivity, temporal succession and seasonal shifts to detritus-plant material in some, providing reduction of competition. A more complete partitioning of prey resources was evident in the Dolores River.
Date: August 1976
Creator: Fuller, Randall L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Nymphs of the Stonefly (Plecoptera) Genus Taeniopteryx of North America

Description: Nymphs of the 9 Nearctic Taeniopteryx species were reared and studied, 1976-78. Two morphologically allied groupings, the Taeniopteryx burksi-maura, and T. litalonicera- starki complexes corresponded with adult complexes. A key separating 7 species, based primarily upon pigment patterns and abdominal setal arrangements, was constructed. Taeniopteryx lita and T. starki were indistinguishable; T. burksi was separated from T. maurawhen no developing femoral spur was present. This study was based upon 839 nymphs. Mouthparts were not species-diagnostic. Detailed habitus illustrations were made for 6 species. Egg SEM study revealed that 3 species were 1.2-1.4 mm diameter, with a highly sculptured chorion, generally resembling a Maclura fruit; micropyle were scattered. Taeniopteryx lita, lonicera, starki and ugola nymphs were described for the first time.
Date: May 1978
Creator: Fullington, Kate Matthews
Partner: UNT Libraries

Exploring the Evolutionary History of North American Prairie Grouse (Genus: Tympanuchus) Using Multi-locus Coalescent Analyses

Description: Conservation biologists are increasingly using phylogenetics as a tool to understand evolutionary relationships and taxonomic classification. The taxonomy of North American prairie grouse (sharp-tailed grouse, T. phasianellus; lesser prairie-chicken, T. pallidicinctus; greater prairie-chicken, T. cupido; including multiple subspecies) has been designated based on physical characteristics, geography, and behavior. However, previous studies have been inconclusive in determining the evolutionary history of prairie grouse based on genetic data. Therefore, additional research investigating the evolutionary history of prairie grouse is warranted. In this study, ten loci (including mitochondrial, autosomal, and Z-linked markers) were sequenced across multiple populations of prairie grouse, and both traditional and coalescent-based phylogenetic analyses were used to address the evolutionary history of this genus. Results from this study indicate that North American prairie grouse diverged in the last 200,000 years, with species-level taxa forming well-supported monophyletic clades in species tree analyses. With these results, managers of the critically endangered Attwater's prairie-chicken (T. c. attwateri) can better evaluate whether outcrossing Attwater's with greater prairie-chickens would be a viable management tool for Attwater's conservation.
Date: May 2013
Creator: Galla, Stephanie J.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Teratogenic and Mutagenic Potential of Triethylenemelamine, Ethyl Methanesulfonate, and N-Ethyl-N-Nitrosourea for Causing Fetal Anomalies in Mus Musculus

Description: In five separate experiments, weight-adjusted doses of TEM, EMS, and ENU were injected intraperitoneally into twelve week-old female mice six hours after mating. On day seventeen of gestation, the females were sacrificed and their uterine contents were examined. The effect of each agent was determined by its ability to cause malformations and death to the developing embryos. All treatment groups showed statistically significant elevated levels of malformations in comparison to their corresponding control groups. The reproductive damage induced in these experiments cannot be singularly attributed to teratogenesis or mutagenesis but a combination of the two.
Date: December 1987
Creator: Gans, Murry J. (Murry Joe)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Glucose Induces Sensitivity to Oxygen Deprivation and Alters Gene Expression in Caenorhabditis Elegans

Description: An organisms’ diet represents an exogenous influence that often yields colossal effects on long-term health and disease risk. The overconsumption of dietary sugars for example, has contributed to significant increases in obesity and type-2 diabetes; health issues that are costly both economically and in terms of human life. Individuals who are obese or are type-2 diabetic often have compromised oxygen delivery and an increased vulnerability to oxygen-deprivation related complications, such as ischemic strokes, peripheral arterial disease and myocardial infarction. Thus, it is of interest to identify the molecular changes glucose supplementation or hyperglycemia can induce, which ultimately compromise oxygen deprivation responses. By utilizing the Caenorhabditis elegans genetic model system, which is anoxia tolerant, I determined that a glucose-supplemented diet negatively impacts responses to anoxia and that the insulin-like signaling pathway, through fatty acid and ceramide biosynthesis and antioxidant activity, modulates anoxia survival. Additionally, a glucose-supplemented diet induces lipid accumulation. Use of RNA-sequencing analysis to compare gene expression responses in animals fed either a standard or glucose-supplemented diet revealed that glucose impacts the expression of genes involved with multiple cellular processes including lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, stress responses, cell division, and extracellular functions. Several of the genes we identified are homologous to human genes that are differentially regulated in response to metabolic diseases, suggesting that there may be conserved gene expression responses between C. elegans supplemented with glucose and a diabetic and/or obese state observed in humans. These findings support the utility of C. elegans to model specific aspects of the T2D disease process (e.g., glucose-induced sensitivity to oxygen deprivation) and identify potentially novel regulators of common complications seen in hyperglycemic and T2D patients (e.g., macrovascular complications).
Date: August 2015
Creator: Garcia, Anastacia M.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Field and Laboratory Fish Tissue Accumulation of Carbamazepine and Amiodarone

Description: The goals of this dissertation work were to assess the bioaccumulation potential of carbamazepine and amiodarone, two widely used ionizable pharmaceutical compounds that possess mid-range and high LogD values, respectively, and to evaluate alternative methods to assess chemical accumulation in bluntnose minnows, catfish, and tilapia. Results indicated that carbamazepine does not appreciably bioaccumulate in fish tissue with BCFk and BAF carbamazepine values < 10. Amiodarone, however, with a log D of 5.87 at pH 7.4, accumulated in fish tissues with kinetic BCF values <2,400. Collectively, the data suggest that full and abbreviated laboratory-derived BCFs, BCFMs derived from S9 loss-of-parent assays, as well as field BAF values are similar for each of the two drugs. In summary, the results from this dissertation indicated: 1) The reduced design BCF test is a good estimate for the traditional OECD 305 test. 2) In vitro S9 metabolism assays provide comparable BCF estimates to the OECD 305 test. 3) Metabolism may play a large role in the accumulation of drugs in fish. 4) Reduced BCF tests and in vitro assays are cost effective and can reduce vertebrate testing.
Date: December 2013
Creator: García Martínez, Santos Noé
Partner: UNT Libraries

Age-Dependent Effects Of Chronic GABAA Receptor Blockade In Barrel Cortex

Description: GABAA receptor binding is transiently increased in rat whisker barrels during the second postnatal week, at a time when neurons in the developing rat cortex are vulnerable to excitotoxic effects. To test whether these GABAA receptors might serve to protect neurons from excessive excitatory input, polymer implants containing the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline were placed over barrel cortex for a 4-day period in young (postnatal days 8 - 12) and adult rats. In the cortex of young, but not adult rats, the chronic blockade of GABAA receptors resulted in substantial tissue loss and neuron loss. The greater loss of neurons in young rats supports the hypothesis that a high density of GABAA receptors protects neurons from excessive excitatory input during a sensitive period in development.
Date: May 2001
Creator: Gargan, Lynn
Partner: UNT Libraries

Effects of Methanol, Atrazine, and Copper on the Ultrastructure of Pseudokirchneriella Subcapitata (Selenastrum Capricornutum).

Description: The toxicity of methanol, atrazine, and copper to Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata (Korshikov) Hindák historically referred to as Selenastrum capricornutum Printz were determined following 96 hrs growth in a modified Goram's growth media. Methanol and atrazine inhibited fluorescence readings in the cultures by 50% (IC50) at concentrations of 2% and 82 µg/l respectively. These toxicity values compared favorably to other published reports. The IC50 for copper was 160 µg/l which is substantially higher than reported values. This is understandable because of the high chelating capacity of Goram's media. The use of stereologically derived relative volume in the chloroplasts, mitochondria, lipid bodies, phosphate bodies, and nucleus was investigated to determine if it could be used as a sensitive endpoint in toxicity tests. The volume fractions for the chloroplasts and mitochondria were normally distributed in control cells while the nuclei, phosphate bodies, and lipid bodies were not. The chloroplasts were the most dominate organelle occupying a mean relative volume of 46% and mitochondria occupied a mean relative volume of 3%. The nucleus and phosphate bodies occupied a median relative volume of 7% and 2% respectively. The lipid bodies were rare in section profile and no meaningful median relative volume could be calculated. Up to the 82nd percentile of sectioned profiles contained no recognizable lipid bodies. The use of relative volume was not a sensitive endpoint for use in toxicity tests. No significant differences in relative volume could be detected in the nucleus or phosphate bodies following any treatment. Limited differences were detected in the mitochondria, chloroplasts, and lipid bodies. The only significant differences that appear to be biologically significant occurred in methanol treated cells where an increase in the lipid bodies' relative volume was apparently concentration dependent. Significant differences in the relative volume of mitochondria and chloroplasts do not appear to be biologically significant.
Date: May 2004
Creator: Garrett, David C.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Effects of Carbaryl (1-Naphthyl-n-methylcarbamate) on Trichocorixa Reticulata (Hemiptera: Corixidae) and Glyptotendipes Barbipes (Diptera: Chironomidae)

Description: My study of the effects of carbaryl in aquatic systems under controlled laboratory conditions emphasized four major objectives: (1) to determine the acute toxicity of carbaryl to the herbivorous adult and immature Trichocorixa reticulata (Guerin)(Hemiptera: Corixidae), and to the omnivorous larvae of Glyptotendipes barbipes (Staeger) (Diptera: Chironomidae) under static bioassay; (2) to adapt a quantitative method of analysis for carbaryl in water and whole insect tissue extract; (3) to measure the accumulation of the insecticide by G. barbipes under static exposure; and (4) to quantify the uptake and loss of carbaryl by G. barbipes under daily-renewed sublethal dosages.
Date: December 1971
Creator: Gash, Stephen L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Some Effects of X-irradiation on the Plasma Corticosterone, Adrenal Weights, and Differential Leukocyte Count in the Rat

Description: The purpose of the present study was twofold: (1) to determine if X-irradiation can be considered a direct stress agent, and if so, to what extent it differs from other stressors; and (2) to further elucidate the role of the adrenal cortex in the radiation syndrome by determining the more immediate responses of this system to X-irradiation.
Date: August 1962
Creator: Gaugl, John F.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Toxicity of Chromium and Fluoranthene From Aqueous and Sediment Sources to Selected Freshwater Fish

Description: Research efforts in aquatic toxicology have historically centered on the chemical analyses and toxic effects of waters to aquatic organisms. More recently, sediment-source toxicity has been explored, with efforts concentrated on establishing sensitive and accurate methodologies. This study focused on the toxicity of trivalent chromium, hexavalent chromium, and fluoranthene to Pimephales promelas, Ictalurus punctatus, and Lepomis macrochirus. Test fish were exposed to both water-borne and sediment-source toxicants for 96 hours (h) and 30 days (d). A 96-h and 30-d LC50 (mg/L Cr, ug/L Fluoranthene) was determined for each fish species exposed to aqueous toxicants. In addition, 96-h and 30-d LC50s were determined for each fish species from sediment chromium concentrations (mg/kg) and sediment fluoranthene concentrations (ug/kg). Although lethality endpoints were used throughout this research, acute effects other than mortality were determined for Lepomis macrochirus exposed to hexavalent chromium. Lethal toxicity values (96-h and 30-d LC50 and their 95% confidence limits) for trivalent chromium could not be determined since trivalent chromium concentations above 6.0 mg/L could not be obtained at water pHs compatible with these fish species. Trivalent chromium addition to test waters at pHs compatible with fish survival resulted in a chromium precipitate that was not lethal to test fish. In contrast, fathead minnows, channel catfish, and bluegill sunfish exposed to hexavalent chromium in water and sediments experienced mortality. Fathead minnows exposed to fluoranthene in water for 96h demonstrated a maximum mortality of 69%, while 100% mortality was achieved with channel catfish in similar tests. Sediment tests with fluoranthene resulted in 100% mortality with both fathead minnows and channel catfish.
Date: May 1990
Creator: Gendusa, Tony C.
Partner: UNT Libraries