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The Relationship of Technology to United States Foreign Policy through Technical Assistance Programs to Underdeveloped Countries

Description: The focus of this work lies in an examination of the effect of technological sophistication upon, and the reactions to technological sophistication by, the United States in its active participation in the international arena. Specifically, this work is to be an examination of one aspect of twentieth century technology, that of the transfer of technology, within the foreign policy considerations of the United States. This work will be further limited to an examination of American foreign policy of technology transfer to the underdeveloped countries of the world.
Date: August 1969
Creator: Griffitts, Garland W.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Appraiser Accuracy Utilizing the Texas Teacher Appraisal System: A Demographic Analysis

Description: The purpose of this study was to determine if there are personal and demographic characteristics which can predict the most accurate teacher appraisers. The demographics were limited to the following: campus-level job assignment, employing district size, sex, race, number of years of experience as an administrator, previous level of teaching experience, and curriculum area taught by the appraiser. The 622 subjects were school administrators trained to utilize the Texas Teacher Appraisal System. The data were analyzed using multiple linear regression. Where an independent variable was significant (.05), a follow-up ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparison were employed. Based on the findings of this study the following conclusions were drawn: 1. A summary data set indicated there was little evidence that any of the demographic variables was a significant predictor of accuracy in the evaluation process. 2. Six different data sets indicated that varying instructional settings and methodologies can influence evaluator accuracy. The campus assignment, years of experience, content area taught, race, and sex of the appraisers were all identified in at least one of the exercise sets as having significance. Except for sex and race, none of the variables was found to be significant when the overall prediction equation with all demographic variables was evaluated. 3. In the prediction equations of this study the percent of variance was so minute that social significance could not be established. 4. The Texas Teacher Appraisal System can be used by appraisers with various backgrounds and experiences without a reduction of accuracy. 5. School boards can appoint appraisers with various backgrounds and experiences without a reduction of accuracy in the process.
Date: December 1988
Creator: Griggs, Bob Evans
Partner: UNT Libraries

Some Effects of Learning the Causes of Behavior upon Certain Personal and Social Attitudes of Pre-Adolescent Children

Description: The problem of the present study is to determine what changes will take place in certain personal and social attitudes of pre-adolescent children at the fourth- and fifth-grade levels as a result of their "having learned about the factors that underlie behavior" through a mental hygiene program utilizing "causally" oriented materials at their own level of interest and understanding.
Date: May 1964
Creator: Griggs, Joseph Wright
Partner: UNT Libraries

An Analysis of the Background Data of Fifty Students Who Failed in the College of Home Economics, Syracuse University

Description: The problem of academic failure has been of real concern to the administration and faculty at Syracuse University. The study at hand is concerned specifically with the problem in the College of Home Economics. Through a study of the data known about students at the time of entrance into the College, it was thought that a better basis for selection night be recommended for the admission of students to the College. Such questions as the following arise in the mind of the research worker: 1. Do the group psychological tests given at the University at the time of entrance give us one basis by which we may predict probable academic success or failure? 2. Are the known high school quartiles dependable bases for selection of successful students? 3. Are there factors in the family backgrounds of these students that.may be significant in their selection? 4. Does an objective personality test have validity as a predictive factor in the success of a student? 5. Do we have any anecdotal records that reveal significant differences in personal adjustment between successful and failed students? 6. Are we able to predict the probable success of failed students upon readmission? 7. Do we have any combination of factors that may be significant in predicting the probable success of a student?
Date: August 1951
Creator: Grimes, Mary Xantha
Partner: UNT Libraries

Quantum Perspectives on Physical and Inorganic Chemistry

Description: Applications of computational quantum chemistry are presented, including an analysis of the photophysics of cyclic trinuclear coinage metal pyrazolates, an investigation into a potential catalytic cycle utilizing transition metal scorpionates to activate arene C-H bonds, and a presentation of the benchmarking of a new composite model chemistry (the correlation consistent composite approach, ccCA) for the prediction of classical barrier heights. Modeling the pyrazolate photophysics indicates a significant geometric distortion upon excitation and the impact of both metal identity and substituents on the pyrazolates, pointing to ways in which these systems may be used to produce rationally-tuned phosphors. Similarly, thermodynamic and structural investigations into the catalyst system points to promising candidates for clean catalytic activation of arenes. The ccCA was found to reproduce classical reaction barriers with chemical accuracy, outperforming all DFT, ab initio, and composite methods benchmarked.
Date: December 2007
Creator: Grimes-Marchan, Thomas V.
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Characteristics of Teacher-Directed Modeling Evidenced in the Practices of Three Experienced High School Choral Directors.

Description: The purpose of this study was to analyze the characteristics of teacher directed modeling evidenced in the practices of three experienced high school choral directors. Research questions were: 1. What modeling activities were exhibited in each teacher's rehearsals? 2. When viewing a 45-minute composite tape of each teacher's instructional activities representative of all rehearsals, what instructional behaviors did each choral director recognize and identify as modeling? 3. What instructional episodes on the composite tape not identified by the teachers contained elements of modeling? 4. What other episodes from the remainder of each choral director's rehearsal practice contributed to an understanding of modeling? Videotapes of three high school choral directors were recorded over the course of one semester. Excerpts from rehearsals were combined to form a 45-minute composite tape of each choral director. A text transcription was made of the composite tape. Participant directors viewed their tape and identified instructional episodes that they recognized as examples of modeling. Identifications were analyzed, and descriptive categories of modeling behaviors were established. Modeling was found to be a teacher generated or delegated act of demonstration. Demonstrations were musical or non-musical and belonging to either of three distinct categories: audible, visible, or process modeling. Subdivisions of each category were found further describing modeling in the high school choral rehearsal. In addition, types of modeling were noted in increasing cognitive complexity required on the part of students beginning with simple imitation and concluding with models as tools for musical problem solving. Research is recommended on a larger sample of participants, including junior high/middle school directors to confirm categories and levels and to develop an observation tool based on results for describing, assessing, and modifying instructional techniques of practicing and pre-service music educators.
Date: December 2001
Creator: Grimland, Fredna H.
Partner: UNT Libraries

An Analysis of Achievement Test Scores to Determine the Effectiveness of a Remedial English Program in a Small University

Description: Freshmen at Sul Ross State University are required to take tests which are used for placement purposes. One of the tests given is the Nelson-Denny Reading Test which measures comprehension, vocabulary, and reading rate. The scores are used with American College Test or Standard Achievement Test scores to place students in either remedial or regular freshman English. Remedial students, who score below the tenth-grade competency level, are placed in English 1300. Regular students are placed in English 1301 or 1302. Twelve studies were found which had been done in this area since 1980. One was directly related to this study. The Anglo and Hispanic population of the freshman class of 1987 was tested. Blacks were not included as they comprised less than 9 percent of the freshman class. There were 69 students in the experimental group and 162 in the control group. A pretest-posttest design was used. A three-way analysis of variance set up data for statistical testing. The Alpha level was set at .05. The findings indicate a significant difference for Hypothesis 1, which predicted no significant difference in the posttest performance of students required to take English 1300 and the pretest performance of students who were not. Therefore it was rejected. Because statistical testing yielded no significant difference for Hypothesis 2 — there will be no significant difference in posttest performance of Hispanic and Anglo students who were enrolled in English 1300, and Hypothesis 3—there will be no significant difference in the posttest performance of males and females who enrolled in English 1300, they were retained. Results indicate that while there is a significant difference between the means of the remedial students' posttest scores and means of the regular students' pretest scores, the program raises the performance of remedial students to a level accepted by Sul Ross State ...
Date: August 1988
Creator: Grimm, J. Ed (Joseph Ed)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Character Education Programs and Student Suspension Rates from School: Do Character Education Programs Decrease Student Suspensions from Regular Instructional Public Elementary Schools in Texas?

Description: The purpose of this study was to determine if character education programs impact the suspension rates of students from regular instructional public elementary schools in Texas. The data was also examined to determine if the number of years since a school's implementation of a character education program has an impact on the effectiveness of the programs as measured by the suspension rates of students from school. Finally, the study sought to determine if the socio-economic status of the schools has an impact on the effectiveness of character education programs as measured by the student suspension rates. A random sample of 135 regular instructional public elementary schools in Texas was collected. The principal of each school completed a questionnaire that was used to sort schools into three groups: schools with "direct" character education programs, schools with "indirect" character education programs, and schools that have implemented no type of character education program. A two-year history of suspensions was obtained for each school. The data was analyzed using one-way and two-way ANOVAs. The results of the analyses indicated that the implementation of character education programs, no matter what type, did not produce statistically significant differences in student suspension rates from school. Furthermore, the data revealed that neither the number of years since the implementation of the character education programs nor the socio-economic status of the schools had an impact on the effectiveness of the character education programs as measured by the student suspension rates from school.
Date: May 2005
Creator: Grinage, Adam L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Accelerated Degree Program Faculty: Motivation to Teach

Description: Adult educators are a growing part of American higher education. Because of their increasing prominence in adult education, it is essential to understand what roles these educators play and what motivates them to remain in the profession despite poor work prospects and conditions. Research to date, however, focuses primarily on the adult learner and not the adult educator. The purpose of this qualitative, multiple-case study was to explore the role and motivation for teaching of adult educators employed as adjunct faculty in an accelerated degree program at a small, liberal arts college in the northwest United States. Purposeful sampling was used to select the five participants for the study. All participants taught in the program for more than five years and were considered to be successful in their positions by peers, students, and administrators. The study employed a preliminary demographic survey to solicit initial background data on the instructors. Other data collection included in-depth, open-ended, face-to-face interviews, document analysis, and classroom observation. The results showed that all five participants identified the following roles and assumed them in the classroom: (a) facilitator, (b) listener, (c) specialist, (d) guide, (e) adviser, and (f) co-learner or colleague. Further results showed that all five participants were motivated to teach in the program for reasons other than monetary compensation. Although participants shared different levels of personal commitment to the institution, they all expressed extensive commitment to teaching, their discipline, and students. Motivating factors for teaching were (a) opportunity to teach part time, (b) love for the subject, (c) opportunity to gain more expertise in the field, (d) opportunity to grow and learn, (e) opportunity to give back, and (f) student success and growth. A major practical implication of this study is that adjunct faculty in an adult education program are motivated to teach for different ...
Date: May 2016
Creator: Grishkevich, Hanna Hults
Partner: UNT Libraries

Detecting Masculinity: The Positive Masculine Qualities of Fictional Detectives.

Description: Detective fiction highlights those qualities of masculinity that are most valuable to a contemporary culture. In mysteries a cultural context is more thoroughly revealed than in any other genre of literature. Through the crimes, an audience can understand not only the fears of a particular society but also the level of calumny that society assigns to a crime. As each generation has needed a particular set of qualities in its defense, so the detective has provided them. Through the detective's response to particular crimes, the reader can learn the delineation of forgivable and unforgivable acts. These detectives illustrate positive masculinity, proving that fiction has more uses than mere entertainment. In this paper, I trace four detectives, each from a different era. Sherlock Holmes lives to solve problems. His primary function is to solve a riddle. Lord Peter Wimsey takes on the moral question of why anyone should detect at all. His stories involve the difficulty of justifying putting oneself in the morally superior position of judge. The Mike Hammer stories treat the difficulty of dealing with criminals who use the law to protect themselves. They have perverted the protections of society, and Hammer must find a way to bring them to justice outside of the law. The Kate Martinelli stories focus more on the victims of crime than on the criminals. Martinelli discovers the motivations that draw a criminal toward a specific victim and explains what it is about certain victims that makes villains want to harm them. All of these detectives display the traditional traits of the Western male. They are hunters; they protect society as a whole. Yet each detective fulfills a certain cultural role that speaks to the specific problems of his or her era, proving that masculinity is a more fluid role than many have previously ...
Date: August 2007
Creator: Griswold, Amy Herring
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Truman Administration and the Attack on the National Origins System

Description: This study attempts to show why the national origins system became increasingly suspect, how the goals of the reformers grew from proposals for minor changes to a demand that the formula itself be abolished, and how the leadership of President Truman and the studies of the special commission helped to focus attention on the issue, unify the reformers, and shape the course of political agitation and education throughout the 1950's.
Date: August 1965
Creator: Griswold, Bobby L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Exploring Fear and Freud's The Uncanny

Description: Fear is one of the oldest and most basic of human emotions. In this thesis, I will explore the topic of fear in relation to literature, both a staple of the horror genre as well as a device in literary works, as well as in my own writings. In addition, I will use Sigmund Freud's theory of the “uncanny” as a possible device to examine the complexities of fear and its effects both on the mind and body through the medium of literature, and, more specifically, where and how these notions are used within my own short stories. By exploring how and why certain fears are generated, we may be able to better examine our own reactions in this regard.
Date: May 2007
Creator: Grizzle, Eric
Partner: UNT Libraries

Franz Liszt: (1811-1886): The Two Episodes from Lenau's Faust as a Unified Work

Description: Franz Liszt composed his Two Episodes from Lenau's Faust between 1856 and 1861. The composer intended to portray two emotionally contrasting scenes from Lenau's Faust in a set for orchestra, the first being The Night Procession and the second The Dance in the Village Inn. Liszt created a duet version of the orchestral set, and also a solo piano version of The Dance in the Village Inn, known as the Mephisto Waltz No. 1. The set was not performed together due to the immense popularity of The Dance in the Village Inn but also due to an unfortunate publication history resulting in the pieces being published separately by Schuberth publishers, published years apart from each other. As a result The Night Procession is largely forgotten today and The Dance in the Village Inn is interpreted as a single work outside of its context in a set. In this dissertation the works are examined from within its context in a set. Background information includes information on Liszt's student Robert Freund (1852-1936), and a solo piano transcription of the orchestral alternative ending to The Dance in the Village Inn. A comparison between Liszt's orchestral, solo and duet versions of the Mephisto Waltz No. 1 and the Liszt-Busoni Mephisto Waltz No. 1 is also made.
Date: August 2007
Creator: Grobler, Pieter Johannes Christoffel
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Vocal Pedagogy of Frederic Woodman Root

Description: Frederic Woodman Root was a vocal pedagogue and writer of the late nineteenth century. He wrote over eighteen books on vocal pedagogy, and numerous articles on singing. Since his death, most of his works have fallen into obscurity. The purpose of this document was to codify the vocal pedagogy of Frederic Woodman Root, discussing his particularly thorough methodology, and to bring his methods back into the public eye. His method is broken down into the various components of basic musicianship, the General Principle, the Three Vowel Forms, registers, breathing, and agility. Examples from Root's exercises are included and discussed.
Date: May 2010
Creator: Grogan, David Christopher
Partner: UNT Libraries

Form and Lyricism as Elements of Neo-Romanticism in Summer Music Op. 31 by Samuel Barber (1957) with three recitals of selected works by Bach, Mozart, Hindemith, Handel, Gaubert, and others

Description: The music of Samuel Barber is well known in the vocal, piano, and string literature; however, little of his chamber music involves woodwinds, and in particular, only one work involves the woodwind quintet. Summer Music, originally commissioned as a septet, developed after the premiere of the work into the woodwind quintet version, with the assistance of the New York Woodwind Quintet. Barber is considered a contemporary .romantic. composer, evidenced through his use of lyricism. Summer Music, a standard in the woodwind quintet literature, should be included in every professional flutist's repertoire. The intent of this dissertation is to consider Barber's use of lyricism as a determinant of the form of Summer Music, as well as to compare the differences between the manuscript and the published edition.
Date: December 2001
Creator: Grosklos, Hollie Jo
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Correlative Study of Gender and Social Style.

Description: This study examines the concepts of social style and gender to determine if a relationship exists between the two constructs. The hypotheses suggested a direct relationship between the categories of the BSRI (masculine, feminine, androgynous, and undifferentiated) and the Social Style Analysis (driver, amiable, expressive, and analytical). Ninety-four participants completed two self-report surveys. Chi-square analysis performed on the data found a significant relationship between feminine and amiable as well as androgynous and expressive. While the analysis suggested that masculine/driver and undifferentiated/analytical were not independent, the relationship found was not significant.
Date: May 2002
Creator: Gross, Amanda
Partner: UNT Libraries