UNT Theses and Dissertations - 27 Matching Results

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History and Development of Theory of Lü: A Translation of Selected Chapters of Huang Ti-Pei's Perspectives of Chinese Music

Description: This study first narrates on the importance of theory of lü-lü (theory of tone generation) in the history of Chinese music from the Chou Dynasty (ca. 400 B.C.) to the Chin Dynasty (ca. end of 19th century), its symbolism and ramification. The main body of this study is devoted to critical translation of Huang Ti-Pei's Perspectives of Chinese Music, particularly those sections which give chronological narratives and comparative critiques of major theories of lü-lü, in order to provide the western scholarship with documents toward understanding the evolution of tone system of Chinese music. The study concludes with a comparison of Chinese tone systems from ancient time to present, and offers comments on comparison of tone systems between the eastern and western musics.
Date: August 1985
Creator: Chen, Whey-Fen
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Preliminary Study of Selected Factors Related to the Decision of Chinese Students to Remain in the United States or Return to Taiwan

Description: The purpose of this study is to explore selected factors that may be related to Chinese students' decisions to remain in the United States or return to Taiwan after they finish their studies. Based upon the Chi Square test, the results are: students likely to remain in the United States are influenced by the understanding of the life style of those Chinese who had stayed, perceived less prejudice from American people, and received political freedom in the United States. Factors influencing the decision to return to Taiwan are likely to include family expectation to return, willingness to devote one's ability for the betterment of Taiwan's future, and stronger identification with Taiwan. It is suggested that a long-term cost-benefit analysis be conducted so that it is possible to understand whether Taiwan's brain drain is a loss or a gain to its development.
Date: May 1978
Creator: Cheng, Mei Lien
Partner: UNT Libraries

Cross-cultural Differences in the Presentation of Depressive Symptoms

Description: Epidemiological studies show that China has a lower prevalence rate of major depression than that of Western countries. The disparity in prevalence is commonly attributed to the tendency of Chinese to somatize depression. Empirical evidence of Chinese somatization has yielded mixed results. The present study thus aimed to 1) examine differences in somatic and psychological symptom reporting between Chinese from Macau and Americans in America and 2) identify cultural and psychological variables that would predict somatization. Independent and interdependent self-construals, sociotropy, and emotional approach coping were hypothesized to predict somatization of depression. Participants included 353 Chinese and 491 American college students who completed self-report measures online. Contrary to prediction, results indicated that Americans endorsed a higher proportion of somatic symptoms than Chinese did. Sociotropy predicted both relative endorsement and severity of somatic symptoms for the American sample, whereas emotional expression coping was related to somatization in the Chinese sample. The findings challenge the common assumption of greater Chinese somatization and highlight the importance of context in understanding the relationships between somatization and cultural and psychological variables. Implications of the present study and future directions are discussed.
Date: May 2015
Creator: Tse, Pui San
Partner: UNT Libraries