UNT Theses and Dissertations - 4 Matching Results

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Factors that Influence Men to Coach Women's NCAA Division II Basketball

Description: This study identified factors that influenced men to coach women's basketball. The CCFQ, designed to determine relative importance of each of nine factors in career selection, was completed by 78 male head coaches of women's NCAA II basketball. Data was analyzed using univariate analysis with repeated measures, t-tests, and ANOVA. These coaches indicated fulfill need for competition, help female athletes reach full potential, and serve as role model as significant influences. Moderate influences included personal attributes of athletes, job attributes, and career advancement. Job availability, belief in own success, and income were not considered influential in career selection. Few differences were indicated between demographic sub-groups on any factor. Factors associated with well being of athletes had the greatest influence.
Date: August 1997
Creator: Jackson, James Calvin
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Acute Hormonal Response to the Kettlebell Swing Exercise

Description: The purpose of this investigation was to examine the acute hormonal response to a bout of kettlebell swing exercise. Ten healthy men (19-30 y, 23.6 ± 3.5 y, 174.6 ± 5.7 cm, 78.7 ± 9.9 kg) who were engaged in resistance training at least twice per week but were inexperienced with kettlebell swings participated in this study. Participants were familiarized with the kettlebell swing exercise during an initial visit. During the subsequent experimental protocol visit, participants performed 12 rounds of 30 seconds of 16-kg kettlebell swings alternated with 30 seconds of rest. Heart rate (HR) and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured at the end of every round of swings. Fasted blood samples were collected pre-exercise (PRE), immediately post (IP), 15 minutes post (P15), and 30 minutes post exercise (P30) and analyzed for total testosterone (T), growth hormone (GH), cortisol, and lactate concentrations. Participants completed a total of 227 ± 23 swings (average swings per round: 19 ± 2). HR and RPE increased significantly (P < 0.05) throughout the exercise protocol. Lactate concentrations were significantly increased at all post exercise time points compared to PRE. T was significantly increased at IP compared to PRE. GH was significantly increased at IP, P15, and P30 compared to PRE. Cortisol was significantly increased at IP and P15 compared to PRE. 12 rounds of 30 seconds of kettlebell swing exercise induced an acute increase in T, GH, and cortisol concentrations in resistance trained men. Additionally, this exercise protocol induced a large increase in HR and lactate concentration. Thus, the kettlebell swing exercise might provide an effective method for simultaneous endurance and resistance training.
Date: December 2013
Creator: Budnar Jr., Ronald Gene
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Effects of Mental Imagery Training on a Baseball Throwing Task

Description: This study was designed to determine if long term training of mental imagery skills is more beneficial to an athlete than immediate imagery rehearsal practiced only prior to an event. Subjects were thirty male high school baseball athletes who were randomly assigned to one of three treatment conditions: (1) long term imagery training and practice; (2) immediate imagery practice only; and (3) control. An accuracy relay-throwing test was performed with pre-test, mid-test, and post-test performance trials. Results of the study revealed no statistically significant differences over the three test periods for any of the treatment conditions. Thus, long term imagery combined with immediate imagery practice, immediate imagery practice and control groups performed equally well on the baseball throwing task.
Date: December 1993
Creator: Freeman, James D. (James David Douglas)
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Effect of Post-resistance Exercise Alcohol Ingestion on LPS-stimulated Cytokines

Description: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of post-resistance exercise alcohol ingestion on LPS-stimulated production of IFNγ, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10. Recreationally resistance-trained men (n = 10, 25 ± 3 yr, 177 ± 7 cm, 83.8 ± 15.7 kg, 14.8 ± 8.5% body fat) and women (n = 8, 23 ± 2 yr, 161 ± 3 cm, 59.5 ± 6.0 kg, 26.5 ± 3.0% body fat) completed the study. Participants visited the laboratory for an initial visit at which time they were screened, familiarized with procedures, and had their 1-repetition maximum (1RM) back squat tested. Subsequently, participants visited the laboratory 2 more times and completed 2 identical heavy resistance exercise bouts (6 sets of 10 repetitions of 80% 1RM back squat) after which a beverage, either containing alcohol (alcohol condition, ALC; 1.09 g EtOH per kg fat free mass) or water (placebo condition, PLA), was administered. Blood samples were collected before exercise (PRE), and at 3 hours (3h) and 5 hours (5h) after exercise. Samples were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and cultured overnight. Supernatant was collected and analyzed for IFNγ, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10. A significant (p < 0.05) main effect for time was found for IFNγ, TNF-α, and IL-1β (5h greater than PRE) and for IL-10 (5h less than PRE and 3h, 3h less than PRE). An interaction effect was found for IL-8 (ALC less than PLA at 5h) and for IL-6 (ALC greater than PLA at PRE and ALC less than PLA at 3h). For IL-6, ALC was less at 3h than at PRE, and PLA was greater at 3h than at PRE. Overall, the LPS-stimulated cytokine response was pro-inflammatory by 5h. Alcohol consumed after heavy resistance exercise reduced LPS-stimulated production of IL-6 and IL-8 but not of IFNγ, TNF-α, IL-1β, ...
Date: August 2015
Creator: Levitt, Danielle E.
Partner: UNT Libraries