UNT Theses and Dissertations - 3 Matching Results

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Galician Daily Life and Social Customs as Seen in Pardo Bazan's Rural Short Stories

Description: In the portrayal of the Galician people Pardo Bazán's naturalistic pessimism is more evident than in her descriptions of customs or landscape. Her characters are stifled and often shattered by living conditions. The environment weighs heavily upon them, bringing forth the more despicable aspects of human behavior. In spite of this, she succeeds in probing the soul of her countrymen and giving them life in her short stories.
Date: December 1973
Creator: Laughlin, Sally Cornette
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Politics of Poverty: George Orwell's "Down and Out in Paris and London"

Description: "Down and Out in Paris and London" is typically perceived as non-political. Orwell's first book, it examines his life with the poor in two cities. Although on the surface "Down and Out" seems not to be about politics, Orwell covertly conveys a political message. This is contrary to popular critical opinion. What most critics fail to acknowledge is that Orwell wrote for a middle- and upper-class audience, showing a previously unseen view of the poor. In this he suggests change to the policy makers who are able to bring about improvements for the impoverished. "Down and Out" is often ignored by both critics and readers of Orwell. With an examination of Orwell's politicizing background, and of the way he chooses to present himself and his poor characters in "Down and Out," I argue that the book is both political and characteristic of Orwell's later work.
Date: May 1992
Creator: Perkins, Marianne
Partner: UNT Libraries

Monsters Like Us: Reexamining “Invasion of the Body Snatchers” Through the Decades

Description: The purpose of this paper is to examine the multiple versions of "Invasion of the Body Snatchers" in concert and determine the reason for their continued presence in the American cultural landscape. To do so I will look at the novel and four films and examine the context in which they were created. In reexamining the novel and films, a central theme begins to emerge: interiority. Fear in "Invasion of the Body Snatchers" moves from an external to an internal threat. The bodily locus of the monstrous other has been re-purposed and re-projected outward. The internal nature of the monstrous threat is displayed in the narrative’s use of production and distribution, mental health professionals, pseudo-families, and the vilification of sleep. Finally, this paper will examine the studio influence on the various films and their impact on the relative endings.
Date: May 2016
Creator: Norton, Elizabeth Harmon
Partner: UNT Libraries