UNT Theses and Dissertations - 70 Matching Results

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Discrimination of Time-Compressed Speech Stimuli: a Comparison Study Using a Closed-Set Task With Older Adults

Description: Use of time-compressed speech stimuli has been found to be clinically effective in differential diagnosis of lesions of the temporal lobe. However, notably absent from the literature is information concerning performance of adults on time-compressed closed-set speech discrimination tasks. The goal of this study mas to compare performance of 12 males and 12 females between age 50 and age 70 on a time-compressed closed-set speech discrimination test against the performance of 12 males and 12 females between age 10 and age 28 on the same task. The Word Intelligibility by Picture Identification test (WPI) was presented in both non-compressed and time-compressed conditions to all subjects. Previous research suggests that a difference in performance between age groups and between males and females in the older age group should be expected. Average results indicated negligible differences between age or gender groups under any of the conditions tested. Additionally, the test yielded perfect or near perfect scores for all subjects in the non-compressed condition. Lack of differentiation of results suggests that the Word Intelligibility by Picture Identification CUIPI) may be insensitive to the discrimination disorders expected in older adults, that the subjects included in the study were atypical of older adults in general and therefore such discrimination disorders did not exist in the sample, or that the subjects in the study uiere able to apply some type of compensatory strategies which resulted in the unexpected performance.
Date: August 1987
Creator: Patterson, Karen Ann
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Economic Feasibility of Utilizing Computer-Assisted Instruction as a Primary Teaching Strategy in Schools of Vocational Nursing in Texas

Description: Each vocational nursing program in Texas was surveyed to determine the faculty and media costs per student classroom instructional hour. Data were obtained from 131 schools, or 99 per cent of the population. These schools taught a total of 4,718 students. The average faculty cost was $1.72 per hour. Faculty cost ranged from $0.17 to $7.75. The average media cost was $0.12 per student hour with a range from no media expenditure to $7.55. The reliability of these costs was not demonstrated. Each program director was asked to identify a principal textbook representing the content taught for each content area in their program. A total of 75 textbooks were identified by two or more programs. A cross tabulation analysis procedure yielded 1,582 combinations of 2 or more textbooks from 2 or more schools. Twenty-five per cent of the schools used the most frequently identified combination of two textbooks. Computer hardware and operating expenses were subtracted from the combined faculty and media cost per student classroom instructional hour. The amount remaining for software purchase was identified as $1.61 with a range of from $0.03 to $7.85 per hour for teaching the required 600 hours. The twenty textbook combinations with the greatest remainder for software utilization were identified. The combination with the largest arithmetic mean remainder was used by 624 students. It was $1.61 per hour. This combination consisted of Ingalls and Salerno's Maternal and Child Health, used to teach maternal and child health, and Hood and Dincher's Total Patient Care, used to teach Medical-Surgical Nursing.
Date: December 1987
Creator: Wilson, Bruce K. (Bruce Keith)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Knowledge and Skills for the Adult Educator in Thailand

Description: The purpose of this study was to identify and specify knowledge and skills needed by adult educators in Thailand. This study provided information for establishing a guide to be used in professional training and in graduate programs in adult education. A three round Delphi technique was used to develop the consensus of findings. The first round solicited open-ended responses from twenty panelists. One hundred and twenty-five knowledge and skill statements, the responses from the first round, were developed into a five-point rating scale questionnaire. This questionnaire was utilized in both Round II and III. Median, mode and interquartile ranges were applied to specify the consensus of the panel of experts. The one hundred and twenty-five knowledge and skill statements, seventy-five knowledge statements and fifty skill statements, were classified into four major categories: teaching, administration, research and general experience. The experts for the study consisted of eleven non-formal education officers and nine university professors in adult/continuing education and non-formal education. From seventy-five knowledge statements, sixteen were rated at the highest priority of importance. Forty-nine statements were rated at above average priority of importance and two statements were rated at average. Eight statements did not meet the interquartile range criterion as a consensus of the panelists. From fifty skill statements, fifteen statements were rated at the highest priority of importance; thirty statements were rated at above average; one statement was rated at average; and four statements failed to meet the interquartile range criterion.
Date: December 1987
Creator: Tamrongsin Jiearatrakul
Partner: UNT Libraries

A National Study of Retention Efforts at Institutions of Higher Education with Baccalaureate Degree Nursing Programs

Description: This study is concerned with the problem of determining the status of.specific student retention efforts at the departmental and institutional levels in institutions of higher education offering baccalaureate degrees in nursing. The purposes of the study include (1) the determination of the percentages of those institutions which have specific programs to increase student retention in place and functioning at the various administrative levels, (2) the determination of those aspects of the many possible retention efforts that are being utilized, (3) identification of those retention efforts which may be most effective, and (4) comparison of retention rates between those institutions with organized retention programs and those without these programs. The population of the study is composed of all 430 of the National League for Nursing (NLN) accredited, Registered Nurse Baccalaureate Degree programs in the United States. The specially designed survey instrument produced a 62 percent response return. Response frequencies and percentages were calculated to show the relative success rates of various retention efforts. In addition, the data were subjected to several statistical procedures to determine if there were statistically significant differences between the various types and levels of retention efforts. The findings indicate that the presence of an organized and functioning program to increase student retention does produce a statistically significant increase in the mean retention rate for those institutions with such programs as compared with those institutions without organized retention programs. This significant increase was constant across the three types or levels of retention programs surveyed (departmental level only, university level only, both university and departmental levels). The majority of the respondents (55.5 percent) do have retention programs in place and functioning at some level in their institutions. Of the six major areas of retention efforts listed on the questionnaire, the area dealing the "Administrative Activities" to increase student retention ...
Date: December 1987
Creator: Catalano, Joseph T.
Partner: UNT Libraries

The American University of Beirut and Its Educational Activities in Lebanon, 1920-1967

Description: The purpose of this study was to trace the historical development of the American University of Beirut and its educational contributions in Lebanon and the Middle East from 1920 to 1967. Through their activities in the Levant in the early nineteenth century, the American missionaries virtually laid the foundations of the Syrian Protestant College, later known as the American University of Beirut. Though religion was the cornerstone in the founding of the University, under the pressure of the local environment, its secular character was to be substituted for the religious one. The establishment of the University in 1866 marked the beginning of the system of higher education in the Arab world. As the first established institution of higher learning, the University played a significant role in raising the level of literacy throughout the region. Despite the difficult times that the University faced throughout its history, it survived and continued its dedicated mission to serve the people of Lebanon and the entire area. For the University, the first 50 years under Ottoman rule was a period of surviving and maintaining its existence. With the freedom it came to enjoy during the French Mandate and later during independence, the University moved into a period of advancing and expanding. By the 1960s the University had become a prestigious institution and captured the support of most people and governments in the area. The study's six chapters describe the historical setting of Lebanon and the origins of its religious groups, the historical background of the American University of Beirut, the educational activities of the University during the French Mandate, and its educational activities under independent Lebanon. The thesis showed that the University had a significant role in the education of the Lebanese and the peoples of the area, and that it has significantly contributed to ...
Date: May 1988
Creator: Sayah, Edward
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Association between Class Size, Achievement, and Opinions of University Students in First-Semester Calculus

Description: The purposes of the study were: to determine the relationship between class size and academic achievement among university students in first-semester calculus classes, and to compare opinions about the instructor, course, and classroom learning environment of university students in small first-semester calculus classes with those in large classes. The sample consisted of 225 university students distributed among two large and two small sections of first-semester calculus classes taught at the University of Texas at Arlington during the fall of 1987. Each of two tenured faculty members taught a large and small section of approximately 85 and 27 students, respectively. During the first week of the semester, scores from the Calculus Readiness Test (CR) were obtained from the sample and used as the covariate in each analysis of covariance of four periodic tests, a comprehensive final examination, and final grade average. The CR scores were also used in a logistic regression analysis of attrition rates between each pair of large and small sections of first-semester calculus. Three semantic differentials were used to test the hypotheses relating to student opinion of the instructor, course, and classroom learning environment. It was found that for both pairs of large and small first-semester calculus classes there was no significant difference in the adjusted means for each of the four periodic tests, the final examination scores, the final grade averages, and the attrition rates. It was also found that the means of the student evaluation of the course by students in small and large classes were not significantly different, and the results of the student evaluations of the instructor and classroom learning environment by students in small and large first—semester calculus classes were mixed.
Date: May 1988
Creator: Warren, Eddie N. (Eddie Nelson)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Attitudes of Faculty Members in the Open Universities in Thailand toward Media Technologies

Description: This study was to compare the attitudes in terms of sex and current position, and to investigate the attitudes of faculty members in Open Universities in Thailand toward media technologies in terms of age, education, and teaching experience. A 25-statement questionnaire, with a reliability of 0.91 for measuring attitudes, was used to gather the data. The total stratified random sampling population was 300 faculty members in the Open Universities, 272 from Ramkhamhaeng University (RU) and 28 from Sukhothai Thammathirat Open University (STOU). The returned rate of the questionnaire was 244 (81.33%), 219 (80.51%) from RU and 25 (89.28%) from STOU. The t test was used to test significant differences between males and females, and administrators and faculties. The one-way analysis of variance was used to test significant differences among the levels of age, education, and teaching experience. The results of this study indicated that the attitudes of faculty members in Open Universities in Thailand toward media technologies were not significantly different in terms of sex, age, education, teaching experience, and current position. The faculty members considered the use of (1) closed circuit television as the form of media which enhanced teaching quality and student learning in virtually all instructional contents, aided instructors, improved instruction, and was readily available; (2) television as the form of media which made the content of the course more clear for students, promoted students* independent study, increased student motivation, was helpful to instructors in improving instruction, and was cost-beneficial; (3) radio as the form of media most frequently used in the past; (4) overhead projector as the form of media most manageable in the teaching process; (5) laser disc player as the form of media too complex for efficient classroom use; and (6) interactive video systems as the form of media most inhibiting to instructors.
Date: May 1988
Creator: Suteera Suriyawongse
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Cardiovascular Responses to Static and Dynamic Muscular Contractions in Adults with Cerebral Palsy

Description: In cerebral palsied adults, the cardiovascular responses to different types of exercise have not previously been ascertained. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the blood pressure and heart rate responses of adults with cerebral palsy to static muscular contractions and to dynamic muscular contractions. Fifteen adults with cerebral palsy and 15 able-bodied adults (average age for each group = 30 years) performed a static exercise protocol and a dynamic resistance exercise protocol using each limb (or the limbs capable of meeting the requirements of the exercise protocol). Heart rate and blood pressure were assessed before, during, and after each exercise bout with each limb. During the static exercise protocol, each subject performed static contractions at 40% of maximal voluntary contraction to fatigue. The dynamic exercise protocol for each limb consisted of three 20-second bouts of hydraulic resistance exercise each of which was followed by 20 seconds of rest. No differences were found between the two groups of subjects in heart rate and blood pressure during static exercise. In dynamic exercise, however, the trend in heart rate from bout to bout differed between the groups. In addition, the cerebral palsied group's diastolic pressure was higher than that of the able-bodied group at the end of dynamic exercise. The findings of this study indicate that although the heart rate and blood pressure responses to dynamic resistance exercise in the cerebral palsied subjects differed from the responses of the able-bodied subjects, healthy adults with cerebral palsy may safely perform both static and dynamic resistance exercise. More research using this disabled population is needed so that guidelines for prescribing exercise for adults with cerebral palsy may be developed.
Date: May 1988
Creator: Parrish,Ginger S.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Characteristics of Development Directors in Charitable Homes for the Aged

Description: This study concerns the characteristics of fund development directors employed in selected homes for the aged. The first purpose of this study is to develop a profile of job functions, through task analysis, among development directors in charitable homes for the aged. The second purpose of this study is to develop a profile of personal characteristics of development directors of charitable homes for the aged based on the following characteristics: age, sex, educational background, experience outside development, membership in community organizations and amount of specific training in fund development. One instrument was used to gather data for the study. It was distributed to a population of 29 development directors in charitable homes for the aged in Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, New Mexico, and Texas. This population was predetermined by an initial survey form sent to 193 chief executive officers in the five states mentioned above. Twenty-nine reported formalized programs employing a full-time person with at least a part-time involvement in fund development activities. Of the twenty-nine development directors surveyed, fifteen usable instruments were received (52 percent). A program was used for the survey that included crosstabulation of social characteristics, success in fund raising, length of time in position and educational preparation. Coded responses were manually typed into the computer. To accomplish the desired analysis, percentages and frequencies were used to treat the data. These non-Parametric procedures provide an understandable overview of the data obtained and are appropriate for the research questions. These procedures permit a summarization of the data in a manageable form. Following the tabulation of frequencies and percentages, Fischer's Exact Probability Test was computed to determine if significant relationships between actual preparation and needed preparation, personal characteristics, educational preparation, and success and usefulness of experience exist.
Date: May 1988
Creator: Wuenschel, Douglas F. (Douglas Ferdinand)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Counseling Service Needs of Chinese College Students: Student, Faculty, and Student Affairs Staff Perceptions

Description: This study was designed to explore the different perceptions of college students' counseling service needs as well as the perceptions of counseling services by the student, faculty, and student affairs staff groups and subgroups of each group. The research approach of this investigation was a case study of one national university in the Republic of China. This study tested seven hypotheses and the major findings are as follows: there were significant differences among students, faculty, and student affairs staff members' perceptions of counseling services in terms of importance and success. Although all three groups agreed that the achievement of the counseling goals were important, the students showed a significantly stronger expectation than did faculty members. Findings related to the success of counseling services in the institution indicated that student affairs staff members showed higher mean scores than did the faculty and students. All three groups perceived a significant discrepancy between the importance of counseling services and the success of counseling services. Moreover, all subgroups of students, as divided by demographic variables, perceived a significant discrepancy between the importance and success of counseling services. All subgroups of faculty and student affairs staff members, except the members of military instructors and members with a mainland China educational background, perceived significant differences between the importance and success of counseling services. The sex, age, class level, academic major, and grade point average of students indicated significant differences either in the importance or the success of counseling services. Likewise, the status, educational background, and degrees earned of faculty and student affairs staff members also showed significant differences in the perceptions of either the importance or the success of counseling services. The study suggested that program planners should be aware of demographic variables when planning counseling programs. Further definitive research is recommended in order to investigate ...
Date: May 1988
Creator: Chang, Sheue Mei
Partner: UNT Libraries

Effect of the New Criteria for Accreditation on Reaffirmation of Accreditation in the South

Description: This study was concerned with characteristics of the process of reaffirmation of accreditation in the Southern region among institutions that completed reaffirmation under the revised _Criteria for Accreditation_ and those that completed reaffirmation under the former _Standards of the College Delegate Assembly._ The institutions that had completed reaffirmation under the new _Criteria_ were identified. A matching group of equivalent institutions which had last completed reaffirmation under the _Standards_ was created. Each group contained 66 institutions. Data were collected using the records of the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. Four areas were identified in which the implementation of the _Criteria_ might affect the process of reaffirmation of accreditation: (a) institutional organization for the self-study, (b) visiting committee composition, (c) number of recommendations by visiting committees, and (d) substance of recommendations by visiting committees. A series of nine hypotheses were tested to assess these effects. The process of reaffirmation of accreditation does not appear to have been substantially affected by the implementation of the new _Criteria for Accreditation._ Institutional organization for the self-study appears unaffected by the implementation of the Criteria for most institutions. There appears, however, to be evidence that the _Criteria_ have effected change for a minority of institutions. The implementation of the _Criteria for Accreditation_ does not appear to have influenced either the size or the composition of visiting committees of peers. The implementation of the _Criteria for Accreditation_ has not increased the average number of recommendations by visiting committees of peers, but there appears to be evidence that it has created a minimum core of recommendations common to many institutions. The addition of the criterion on institutional effectiveness apparently has created a new and proportionately overrepresented focus for visiting committee recommendations.
Date: May 1988
Creator: Freeman, Irving
Partner: UNT Libraries

Factors Related to Travel Mode Choices in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metropolitan Area

Description: This study examined the factors related to travel mode choices in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metropolitan Area. Changes in population, life style and economy of the Dallas-Fort Worth region over the last few decades demand a careful re-examination of travel demand tools and methods. The purpose of the study was to provide an understanding of transportation modal choice in the region. Those demographic variables best predicting the choices were identified. The Home Interview Survey, a set of disaggregate data from the 19 84 North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) Regional Travel Survey, was analyzed using logistic regression. The major findings of the research indicate that about 97 percent of the travelers in the study area used private cars and 3 percent used public transit. Household income and cars-vans were significant explanatory variables. The impact of household income and number of car-vans available upon an individual's decision for travel mode choice were very important. The number of car-vans available in the household, and age of respondents were significant predictors in travel mode. Household members with incomes of $30,000 to $39,000 and those with incomes of at least $50,000 tended to use more private cars than did other income groups. Also, household members with incomes below $9,000 used more public transportation. People reporting a lower preference for cars were younger than 26 years or older than 55 years of age.
Date: May 1988
Creator: Karimpour, Abdolmehdi
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Local Economic Impact of Alternative State Budget Reductions for Selected Texas Community Colleges

Description: The purpose of this study was to determine the local economic impact of alternative state budget reductions for Texas community colleges by investigating the income losses to the Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) if state appropriations were reduced by 10, 15, and 20 percent. The objective of this study was achieved through an economic analysis of the local economy of selected MSAs and by computing the income size which was generated by selected colleges. Eight community colleges located in eight MSAs participated by answering mailed questionnaires. The model of Direct Economic Impact was applied to describe the colleges' economic impact. The model was composed of college expenditures, employee expenditures, student expenditures, and the economic multiplier. The study revealed that the selected community colleges were responsible for creating new jobs and increasing the income of the local economies. These eight colleges were responsible for increasing the income of the local economies by $294,945,560 and for creating 5,129 jobs. Reduction in state appropriations to the selected community colleges will reduce the income they produce. A state appropriation cut of 10 percent will result in a loss to the local economy of $6,153,951. A 15 percent reduction in state appropriations will cause the local economy to lose $9,230,943. A 20 percent reduction in state appropriations will reduce the local economic income by $12,307,920.
Date: May 1988
Creator: Saleh, Abdelrahim
Partner: UNT Libraries

Relationship among Mosby's Assess Test Scores, Academic Performance, and Demographic Factors and Associate Degree Nursing Graduates' NCLEX Scores

Description: This ex post facto study sought to examine: the efficacy of Mosby's Assess Test as a valid predictor of NCLEX (National Council of State Boards of Nursing Licensure Examination) scores; significant correlations among semester averages, semester tests failed, Nelson Denny Reading Test scores, and NCLEX scores; and differences in NCLEX outcomes in relation to ethnicity, age, and prior practical nursing licensure for 558 associate degree nursing graduates who wrote the NCLEX in 1983 and 1984. Significant positive relationships were found among Mosby scores, Nelson Denny scores, semester averages, and NCLEX scores. A significant negative relationship was found between number of semester tests failed and NCLEX scores. The mean NCLEX score of older graduates was higher than the mean NCLEX score of younger graduates. LPN graduates had a higher mean NCLEX score than non-LPN graduates. White graduates' mean NCLEX score was greater than the average score for black graduates. Combined predictor variables which yielded the best estimate of the criterion variable (NCLEX scores) for all graduates included mean semester average, Mosby scores, age above thirty-three, and Nelson Denny scores, respectively. The most important predictor of black graduates' NCLEX success was prior practical nursing licensure. Other significant predictors for black graduates' NCLEX success were mean semester average, Mosby scores, mean number of semester tests failed, age above thirty-three, and Nelson Denny scores, respectively. Mean semester average, mean score of the Mosby test, mean number of semester tests failed, and age above thirty-three were the most significant predictors of white graduates' NCLEX success. Older graduates had a higher mean Mosby score, a higher mean semester average, and failed fewer semester tests than younger graduates. The study results will be of interest to nurse educators and counselors who are concerned with curricular revision, student counseling, and remediation procedures as these relate to enhancement of ...
Date: May 1988
Creator: Cloud-Hardaway, Sarah A. (Sarah Anne)
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Study of Student and Faculty Perceptions of Academic Advising at Ramkhamhaeng University

Description: The purpose of this study was to assess the perceptions of academic advising needs by faculty advisors and students at Ramkhamhaeng University, Bangkok, Thailand, using the Academic Advising Needs Questionnaire developed by Thomas H. Burke. The assessment is based on age, sex, education level, academic rank, years of advising, and number of advisees. The questionnaire consisted of 15 items, using a four-point rating scale. The population consisted of a total of 280 faculty members and 700 resident students at all seven faculties at Ramkhamhaeng University, Bangkok, Thailand. A total of 230 faculty members or 82.14 percent of the sampling and a total of 561 students or 80.14 percent of the sampling participated in this study. The t-test, Spearman s Coefficient of Rank Correlation, and Kendall's Coefficient of Concordance W were used in the follow-up assessment, with the level of significance at .05. Data were collected by means of two Academic Advising Needs Questionnaires for this study. Questionnaires were distributed to faculty advisors and students. While students revealed some degree of need in all advising areas, the five highest ranked items were: (1) serve as a student's personal reference for prospective employers and/or graduate goals, (2) assist students in obtaining part-time work experiences (paid or unpaid) which complement their career and/or educational goals, (3) assist students with career/vocational planning, (4) help students explore possible graduate/professional school study, and (5) provide students with academic advice and suggestions for scholastic improvement. Faculty responses indicated student need in all advising areas; the five highest ranked items were: (1) assist students with career/vocational planning, (2) help students explore possible graduate/professional school study, (3) assist students in selecting a major, (4) inform students of the employment opportunities in the students' intended fields of study, and (5) assist students in obtaining part-time work experiences (paid or unpaid) ...
Date: May 1988
Creator: Chartchai Essarum
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Study of Student and Faculty Perceptions of the Academic Advising Needs of Students in Six Teachers' Colleges in Bangkok, Thailand

Description: The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the academic advising needs of students as perceived by students and faculty advisors through faculty advising functions in the six teachers' colleges in Bangkok, Thailand. Fifteen faculty advising functions were included in a questionnaire validated by a panel of three judges. The questionnaires were distributed to students and faculty advisors in the six teachers' colleges by two selected research assistants. A total of 180 faculty advisors and 540 junior and senior teacher training students at the six teachers' colleges in Bangkok, Thailand, were selected using stratified random sampling. The usable and complete questionnaires received included 109 from faculty advisors (60.56 per cent) and 350 from students (64.81 per cent). The t-test, the Kendall's Coefficient of Concordance W, and the Spearman's Coefficient of Rank Correlation were employed to determine and compare the differences, the agreements, and the relationships of academic advising needs of students as perceived by students and faculty advisors, respectively. Analyses of the data revealed that students and faculty advisors in the six teachers' colleges in Bangkok, Thailand, perceived a mismatch between student advising needs now being fulfilled and student advising needs that should be fulfilled. Apparently, the academic advising programs in the teachers' colleges were not meeting the student needs. However, for student advising needs which should be fulfilled, both students and faculty advisors ranked personal, vocational and career, and academic areas very high. Overall, students and faculty seemed to agree on the advising needs which should be fulfilled.
Date: May 1988
Creator: Vinich Getkham
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Study of the Perceptions of the Role of Deans of Students at Selected Universities in the Republic of China

Description: This study was designed to explore the perceptions of the leadership behavior of deans of students at 15 universities in the Republic of China (ROC). The study groups included the deans of students, student affairs staff members, and student leaders within the 15 universities. The Leader Behavior Description Questionnaire (LBDQ) was employed to assess the leadership behavior of the deans of students in the dimensions of initiating structure and consideration. The population included 10 current deans of students and 8 former deans of students, 173 student affairs staff members, and 224 student leaders. In addition, six current deans of students and one officer of the Ministry of Education were interviewed by the researcher. The conclusions are as follows. 1. Current and former deans of students had the same perceptions and expectations of the leadership behavior in the initiating structure and consideration dimensions. 2. Effective leadership behavior of deans of students was associated with high scores on initiating structure and consideration. 3. Deans of students employed different leadership behaviors to lead the student affairs staff members and student leaders. 4. The leadership behavior of the deans of students was inclined toward high initiating structure and low consideration. 5. Deans of students and student affairs staff members had differing perceptions of leadership behavior on real consideration. 6. Deans of students and the student leaders had differing perceptions of leadership behavior on real initiating structure. This study suggested that a dean of students may want to employ a plan of self-study, or participate in leadership training programs, workshops, and conferences related to student affairs to improve leadership behavior effectively. Further research to examine the perceptions of the leadership behavior of deans of students is recommended.
Date: May 1988
Creator: Chen, Chin Kuei.
Partner: UNT Libraries

An Analysis of the Perceptions of Physics Teaching Effectiveness as Viewed by Students and Physics Instructors in Universities in Thailand

Description: The purpose of this study was to investigate the perceptions of the physics instructors, major-physics students, and nonmajor-physics students regarding actual teaching performance and effective teaching performance. The sample consisted of a total of 56 physics instructors, 120 major-physics students, and 120 nonmajor-physics students at eight public universities in Thailand. A total of 53 physics instructors or 94.64 percent, 101 major-physics students or 84.17 percent, and 107 nonmajor-physics students or 89.17 percent responded in this study. Multivariate analysis of variance, univariate analysis, one-way analysis of variance, and multiple regression were used in the follow-up assessment, with the .05 level of significance. The physics instructors, major-physics students, and nonmajor-physics students perceived actual teaching performance in class to be significantly different from effective teaching performance. The three groups rated actual teaching performance on every factor to be less than sffective teaching. There was a significant difference between the physics instructors' perceptions and the major-physics students' perceptions regarding actual teaching performance, and also there was a significant difference between the physics instructors' perceptions and the nonmajor-physics students' perceptions regarding actual teaching performance. However, there was no significant difference between major-and nonmajor-physics students' perceptions regarding actual teaching performance. There was no significant difference among the perceptions of the physics instructors, major-physics students, and nonmajor-physics students regarding effective teaching performance. The variables of sex and the highest degree were the significant predictors of the physics instructors' perceptions regarding actual teaching performance. The variable of GPA was the significant predictor of the nonmajor-physics students' perceptions regarding actual teaching performance.
Date: August 1988
Creator: Chayan Boonyaraksa
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Educational Contributions of Dr. W.A. Criswell, Pastor of the First Baptist Church, Dallas, Texas, 1944-1987

Description: Dr. W. A. Criswell is the well known pastor of the twenty-seven thousand member historic First Baptist Church in downtown Dallas, Texas. He has held the position for the past forty-three years. Until now no one has attempted an in-depth study of Criswell's educational contributions to the First Baptist Church (which have also been adopted into the Southern Baptist denomination, America's largest Protestant religious organization). Although Criswell has been the Senior Pastor of the First Baptist Church of Dallas for many years, this was by no means his introduction to the pastorate. In 1928 he was ordained as a seventeen year old minister of the gospel in Amarillo, Texas. He has been a pastor for over sixty years. Criswell has made a lasting impact on the church staff, school staff (Criswell College and First Baptist Academy), students in those schools, the Southern Baptist denomination and also the city of Dallas. He has been one of the key figures in evangelical national movements. Presidents, Vice-Presidents, Senators, and Governors are no strangers to a Sunday morning service held in the large sanctuary in downtown Dallas. Much of the research for this project originated from the Oral Memoirs of W. A. Criswell. a program for oral history done by two professors (Charlton and Spain) from Baylor University. The study begins with a historical review of the setting of the First Baptist Church in 1944 when Criswell came to be pastor. Next there is a review of Criswell's early life that reveal influences which molded his educational philosophies. The body of knowledge is then presented which points out significant events, contributions, institutions and associations provided by Criswell. Finally, seventeen conclusions are drawn from the data presented. The study provides helpful information to pastors, church administrators, seminary students, theological professors and other individuals involved in ...
Date: August 1988
Creator: Rohm, Robert A. (Robert Allan)
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Historical Development and Future of the National Technological University

Description: The National Technological University (NTU), a consortium of more than twenty American engineering schools, broadcasts courses produced at member institutions to professional engineers at corporate sites across the country. It is a nonprofit institution.begun in fall 1984 with headquarters in Fort Collins, Colorado, which offers only course work leading to the Master of Science degree in various branches of technology, or applied science. Students must be sponsored by their corporate employers who pay their tuition. This is the first systematic examination of the instructional process at an educational institution created in response to the demands of the governmental and corporate sectors' technological needs. This study includes an attempt to explore the effectiveness of that instructional process and the use of computers in distance education at NTU and implications for institutions of the future. This study focuses on distance education, corporate education, national universities and nontraditional institutions and the extent to which NTO exemplifies each of these concepts. It covers the organizational structure and methods of operation of NTU, and offers opinions of students, faculty, and other personnel associated with the institution as reflected by surveys, interviews, and the media.
Date: August 1988
Creator: Mays, Marilyn Elaine
Partner: UNT Libraries

An Historical Review of Higher Education in Kenya Since 1975, with an Emphasis on Curriculum Development

Description: This study focuses on the history of higher education in Kenya since 1975, with an emphasis on curriculum development. The main purposes of the study were (1) to describe the historical events of higher education in Kenya since 1975, and (2) to analyze the present system of higher education in the country. The study attempted to answer questions related to higher education in Kenya. The questions investigated were (1) how had the characteristics of higher education curriculum changed since 1975?; (2) in what ways had the purposes of higher education in Kenya changed since 1975?; (3) to what extent have these purposes been achieved? why or why not?; and (4) which events since 1975 had a major impact on higher education in Kenya? The major analysis of the study is historical and gives an explanation of the history of the development of higher education in the colonial days in Kenya, briefly discussing the period 1963-75. The analysis of Kenyan institutions of higher education covers the development of Kenyan higher education since 1975. The discussion consists of basic facts of Kenyan higher education. Data from primary and secondary sources were analyzed and studied. Documents were chronologically and topically reviewed. Chapter I of the study is the introduction. The history of higher education is in Chapter II. Chapter III discusses the impact of Western education in Kenya. Chapter IV deals with development, politics, and Kenyan higher education. Chapter V contains the summary, a discussion, and conclusions based on the facts presented in Chapters I through IV. Since 1975, higher education in Kenya has emphasized vocational and technical education, African culture, natural sciences, and rural development.
Date: August 1988
Creator: Munywoki, Mathenge
Partner: UNT Libraries

Identification of Predictors of Success in Individualized Computer Courses

Description: This study provides a rationale for advising students on whether to enroll in individualized/self-paced computer courses. It identifies seven factors that have a significant correlation with success in an individualized computer course. The sample comprises all the students enrolled in individualized computer courses at Lee College, Baytown, Texas in the spring semester of 1988. Students completed a survey to determine whether they had previous computer experiences, whether they operated with a level of introvert personality characteristics, and whether the individualized computer course was their first choice. Students completed a learning style inventory and a score was determined using the items relating to individualized computer studies. Data collected in the Lee College records office included high school percentile rank, standardized reading score, standardized mathematics score, college hours completed, course withdrawals, and age. The following seven factors were shown by the data to have a significant correlation with a final grade (in order of decreasing significance): (a) learning style inventory, (b) high school percentile, (c) standardized mathematics score, (d) standardized reading score, (e) previous computer experience, (f) number of college hours, and (g) age. The following three factors were shown by the data to have no significant correlation with a final grade: (a) course withdrawals, (b) degree of personality introversion, and (c) the individualized computer course as first choice. The findings substantiate the hypothesis that success in an individualized computer course might be attributed to certain factors, and once identified, these factors can be used in advising students. Advisors should use as many of the seven factors (identified as significant), as possible in helping students choose between individualized and traditional computer courses.
Date: August 1988
Creator: Russell, John D. (John David), 1938-
Partner: UNT Libraries

Nonprofit Corporate Colleges: a Description of Their Curricula, Faculty, and Students

Description: The purposes of this study were (1) to describe and analyze the organization and content of nonprofit corporate curricula, (2) to describe and analyze the background and status of nonprofit corporate college faculty, and (3) to describe and analyze the demographics, educational background, and employment characteristics of students in nonprofit corporate colleges. Institutional demographics on student enrollment, number of graduates, admission policy, tuition cost, types of financial aid programs, student housing, and schedule of classes were gathered as well. Data were collected from survey instruments returned by 12 nonprofit corporate college administrators. The data were treated to produce frequencies and percentages. The study revealed that the majority of nonprofit corporate colleges are specialized institutions which primarily offer graduate degree programs. Faculty are most likely full-time, non-tenured employees. White males between the ages of 25 and 40 constitute an overwhelming majority of the student population. Two major findings unrelated to the purposes of the study were revealed during this investigation. They are (1) the term corporate college and the definition are sometimes misunderstood and (2) three corporate colleges identified last year have ceased operating as post-secondary degree-granting institutions.
Date: August 1988
Creator: Parker, Karen, 1960-
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Relative Value and Importance of Perceived Benefits of Active Foundations of Public Community Colleges in the United States

Description: The problem of this study was the relative value and importance of perceived benefits of active foundations of public community colleges. The purposes were to identify a list of benefits; determine the importance of these benefits as perceived by presidents and foundation executive directors; assess the degree to which the level of importance of the benefits was affected by college or foundation demographics or foundation executive director characteristics; and to determine if presidents and foundation executive directors differ in their perceptions of the importance of the benefits. Survey instruments were mailed to presidents and foundation executive directors of colleges determined to have active foundations. Both instruments contained seven categories listing potential benefits to the community colleges of an active foundation. The foundation executive directors' instruments also requested college and foundation demographic data. Respondents were asked to rate the benefits according to their level of importance. Analysis of variance tests were performed to determine whether the categories of benefits were affected by any of the demographic data, when a level of significance emerged, a Scheffe' test was performed to determine the source of significance. Major findings were that the most important single benefit to the community colleges of active foundations is the provision of student scholarships. The "Public Relations/Political Influence" role of the active foundation is the most important category of benefits. The more fund-raising activities held and the greater the amount of contributions, the more positively community college administrators felt about the role of their active foundations in terms of external relations. Highly experienced foundation executive directors were more positive about the importance of the public relations role of their active foundations than were their inexperienced counterparts. The major conclusion of this study was that community colleges benefit from having active foundations, both monetarily and through the role of the ...
Date: August 1988
Creator: Henry, Elizabeth H. (Elizabeth Henderson)
Partner: UNT Libraries