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Synthesis and Characterization of Two and Three Coordinate Gold (I) Conjugated and Rigid Metallodendrimers

Description: This dissertation is a study of two major topics that involve synthetic strategies for new classes of phosphorescent gold(I)-based metallodendrimers. The phosphorescence of organic and inorganic luminophores originates from spin-orbit coupling owing to internal or external heavy atom effects as well as metal-centered emissions. Previous work in the Omary group entailed systematically designed small molecules, metallopolymers, and unconjugated metallodendrimers that contain d10 and d8 metals, whereas this dissertation aims in part to expand such strategies to the conjugated metallodendrimer regime. In one approach novel synthetic strategies were used to make first-generation phenyl acetylene dendrimers and phosphine derivatives thereof. The phosphine dendrimers are made by tethering one of the phosphines to an unsaturated dendrimer, as such phosphine dendrimers are better chromophores and luminophores due to their structural rigidity and extended conjugation. In another approach, 2- and 3-coordinate Au(I) dendritic complexes are synthesized from these phosphine dendrimers. This study is further extended to study metallodendritic complexes with different cores, for example triphenylene-based metallodendritic complexes with six acetylene branches. The physical properties of the metallodendrimers can be modulated upon proceeding to further dendrimer generations or by using solubilizing groups on the peripheral phosphines, thus allowing better processability for thin-film fabrication as required for molecular electronic devices and higher chance for crystal growth toward accurate structural characterization. Other data produced in this project suggested that some structural alterations led to porous solids that render them suitable for realized and potential applications in energy storage and carbon capture. The interesting luminescence properties of the metallodendrimers and porous extended solids produced in this dissertation are significant toward utilizing such materials for optoelectronic applications such as energy-saving organic light-emitting diodes and optical sensors for environmental pollutants.
Date: August 2012
Creator: Kaipa, Ushasree
Partner: UNT Libraries