UNT Theses and Dissertations - 2 Matching Results

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An Assessment of Fruit Offerings for 7Th and 8Th Grade Students in Texas

Description: Childhood obesity in America is reaching epidemic proportions. This study explored whether daily online lunch menu information was sufficient to enable parents to advise their children about healthy and unhealthy menu choices in 350 Texas middle schools and whether online menu information strongly correlated with the descriptions of the offerings given by 52 school cafeteria managers in telephone interviews. Although schools are making efforts to describe their offerings, they are not vigorously taking advantage of the opportunity to aggressively inform or educate. They are not coding their descriptions in such a way as to explicitly brand food as healthy or unhealthy. They are also not labeling food as generally required by law for consumer services that provide food (except for the fresh produce that lines supermarket shelves). Instead, they only briefly describe what they are serving in the way of fruit in one or two word snippets. Finally, cafeteria managers’ online descriptions were inconsistent with what they described in interviews. Online and verbal descriptions were sometimes contradictory, raising questions about the accuracy of either type of description.
Date: August 2012
Creator: Paschal, Ryan Tyler
Partner: UNT Libraries

Impact of Congruence Between Self-disclosed Personal Information and Review on Source Credibility in Online Travel Reviews

Description: This experimental study examined the source-message congruence effect on source credibility by manipulating the congruence of the reviewer’s profile information (travel interest, geographical location) with no changes in the review content. the congruence effect was found to influence perceptions of the reviewer’s expertise in a travel interest. This finding suggests that revealing the reviewer’s travel interest can assist the credibility assessment of travel reviewers-particularly in terms of expertise-within the category of a travel interest. the refined classification of travel reviewers based on their travel interests can improve their usefulness as information sources for prospective travelers’ information searches. These attributes can further be employed as search cues if embedded in the reviewer’s profile.
Date: May 2012
Creator: Park, Hee Lye
Partner: UNT Libraries