UNT Theses and Dissertations - 7 Matching Results

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A Comparison of Christopher Marlowe's Edward II and William Shakespeare's Richard II

Description: This study purports to examine several areas of similarity between the chronicle history plays by Christopher Marlowe and William Shakespeare. Edward II and Richard II are alike in many ways, most strikingly in the similarity of the stories themselves. But this is a superficial likeness, for there are many other likenesses--in purpose, in artistry, in language--which demonstrate more clearly than the parallel events of history the remarkable degree to which these plays resemble each other.
Date: January 1960
Creator: Ford, Howard Lee
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Problem of the Artist in Society : Hawthorne, James, and Hemingway

Description: The relationship of James to Hawthorne and of Hemingway to James certainly indicates the close literary relationship of the three writers. This development makes it seem only natural that three such self-conscious artists would have recourse to similar interests and would employ in their writings common themes, ideas, and methods.
Date: August 1960
Creator: Beggs, Jane K.
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Study of The Vicar of Wakefield

Description: The Vicar of Wakefield is neither a sensational novel directed toward the reform of mankind nor does it mark an advance in fictional techniques. Rather, it is conventional both in form and substance. Despite this literary orthodoxy, the novel has remained popular with critics and the reading public for two centuries. Previous plot studies of The Vicar have concentrated principally on Goldsmithss failure to utilize adequately the cause-effect relationship. With few exceptions, all scholars who have studied this plot find coincidence and accidental meeting the novel's greatest weakness. Most character analyses of the narrative have centered on the chief character. While one critic attributes "typical human naturalness" to the Vicar, another finds him "an impossible mixture of folly and wisdom" and "an inadequate cog in a poorly designed machine.." In thematic studies of The Vicar, critics have attempted with little success to define the major theme. Those themes which have received most extensive treatment are the contrast of appearance and reality, the innate goodness of man, the limitations of contemporary literature, the corruption in government, and the ideal nature of rural life. A few stylistic studies of the novel have concentrated their praise on Goldsmith's spontaneity, some, contradictorily, on his careful diction, and others on his success in handling both humor and pathos.
Date: August 1960
Creator: Arthur, Lynda Ruth
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Theme of Isolation in the Novels of Daniel Defoe

Description: It is the purpose of this paper to illustrate from the novels themselves that Defoe's protagonists are essentially isolated individuals and that this isolation is the result of the circumstances of their births, the nature of their professions, their spiritually isolating religious beliefs, and their attitudes toward their fellow men.
Date: August 1960
Creator: Neuhaus, Clemens H.
Partner: UNT Libraries