UNT Theses and Dissertations - 15 Matching Results

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Characterization of Women in the Fiction of Nathaniel Hawthorne

Description: While his Transcendentalist contemporaries were expounding their optimistic philosophy of natural goodness, progress, and perfectibility, Hawthorne probed into the human heart, recording the darkest motives of his characters and writing bitter criticism of life. Around him men were declaring that scientific inventions, political organizations, and religious reforms were ushering in a new era; but Hawthorne viewed the new society as a probable continuation of old evils and a manufacturer of new ones. His fiction has been called "an elaborate study of the centrifugal, . . . a dramatization of all those social and psychological forces that lead to disunion, fragmentation, dispersion, incoherence. Critics generally comment on Hawthorne's obsession with guilt. His pessimistic analysis of the mind, his somber outlook on living, and his personal tendency to solitude are frequently credited to his Puritan ancestry; yet as Arvin points out, "He had no more Puritan blood than Emerson and hundreds of other New Englanders of his time: and who will say that they were obsessed with the spectral presence of guilty. One must go beyond Calvinist theology to comprehend the source of guilt that hovers over the pages of his fiction. His religious, moral, educational, and economic background was so typical of his time and locality that one can hardly believe that the nature of his writing or thinking could have been determined by these factors. Indeed, his imperviousness to contemporary influences causes one to look intensely at his personal life in searching for the explanation of the Hawthorne enigma. An important influence on his writing was his prolonged association with women. From his life in a feminine world and his reaction to that world, he devised the major part of his style, themes, and feminine character types. A review of the facts of his biography will establish the nature of ...
Date: August 1956
Creator: Estes, Emory Dolphous, Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Effect of Journalism on Modern American Writing

Description: This paper is an analysis of the relationship between journalism and formal literary usage in America. It is the purpose of this study to define and illustrate characteristics of modern journalese and to make a comparison of standards of correct usage advocated by recent textbooks in English composition and journalism. Particular attention will be given to diction, structure and length of sentences, capitalization, abbreviation, and punctuation. The conclusion will be a brief evaluation of modern journalism, a succinct resume of its impact on modern language and literature, and a simple prediction of future tendencies in journalistic and literary language. And to give a better perspective to the analysis of journalism and American English, the paper begins with a description of the American linguistic heritage.
Date: August 1956
Creator: Estes, Dorothy Southerland
Partner: UNT Libraries

Falsity in Man: Tennessee Williams' Vision of Tragedy

Description: It is the purpose of this paper to examine the major plays of Tennessee Williams in an effort to formulate the key concepts which appear in the work of a modern successful dramatist who is sensitive to the tragedy of man and to discover Williams' beliefs in regard to man, his need, and the tragedy that results if he does not find the fulfillment of his nature.
Date: 1956
Creator: Kindle, Betty Brewer
Partner: UNT Libraries

The French Element in the English Language

Description: The present study has been undertaken in order to create an informative presentation of the scope of French influence throughout the development of English. With this goal in mind a word list has been compiled and arranged by historical periods to show to what extent the language of each period has benefited from its borrowing.
Date: 1956
Creator: Brooks, Herbert Frank
Partner: UNT Libraries

Modern Trends in the Interpretation of Falstaff

Description: The different interpretations of the character of Sir John Falstaff have been so controversial that at no time since the presentation of the Henry IV plays have critics been able to agree as to his precise qualities. He has been called the greatest humorous character in all literature by even those critics who have spoken adversely of his other traits. George Bernard Shaw called him "a besotted and disgusting old wretch," an opinion added to those of others who have seen him as a coward, liar, cheat, thief, glutton, and rogue. There is no denying that he is one of the most captivating and controversial of all characters in English literature.
Date: August 1956
Creator: Boswell, Fred Page
Partner: UNT Libraries

Structure as a Literary Technique in the Major Novels of Ernest Hemingway

Description: The purpose of this thesis is to study the structure of the five major novels of Hemingway, excluding Torrents of Spring and Across the River and into the Trees. They are: The Sun also Rises; A Farewell to Arms; To Have and Have not; For Whom the Bell Tolls; and The Old Man and the Sea.
Date: 1956
Creator: Harrell, Robert Bruce
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Survey of Shakespearean Productions in New York: 1935-1955

Description: The aim of this thesis is to present a comprehensive view--a survey--of plays by William Shakespeare that have been produced for the New York stage from 1935 through 1955 in order to ascertain not only the quantity of Shakespearean drama that has been presented during this twenty-one-year period, but also to appraise the quality of the productions as seen by the critics. A related aim of this study will be the analysis of the televised Shakespearean plays by presenting the works and their merits through the eyes of the critics of that medium.
Date: 1956
Creator: King, Mary Inez
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Treatment of Women in the Restoration Comedy of Manners

Description: Reflecting the real beau monde of Restoration London, the treatment of women in the comedy of manners was the best and most unusual characteristic of this dramatic type. With the first gay reaction against the past, the independent ladies demanded complete equality with men; intellectually, they gained that equality. To the gay belles, no less than to the beaux, wit was the passport to society. The truewit had everything; the witwould was social refuse, marked for that worst of all punishment--ridicule.
Date: August 1956
Creator: Brock, Dorothy Sala
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Wordsworths' Scottish Tour

Description: Together Dorothy and William translate. a simple tour into aesthetic loveliness To his sister the journey was the juxtaposition of impoverished society and pastoral elegance. To Wordsworth the tour was a reawakening of poetic Impulse. Through his intense feeling for natural beauty, Wordsworth became the poet of all mankind..
Date: August 1956
Creator: Bingman, Marilyn L.
Partner: UNT Libraries