UNT Theses and Dissertations - 9 Matching Results

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Epic Qualities in Moby-Dick

Description: Many critics not satisfied with explaining Moby-Dick in terms of the novel, have sough analogies in other literary genres. Most often parallels have been drawn from epic and dramatic literature. Critics have called Moby-Dick either an epic or a tragedy. After examining the evidence presented by both schools of thought, after establishing a workable definition of the epic and listing the most common epic devices, and after examining Moby-Dick in terms of this definition and discovering many of the epic devices in it, I propose the thesis that Melville has written an epic, not unlike the great epics of the past.
Date: August 1952
Creator: Russell, John Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Influence of Women on Walt Whitman

Description: It is the scope and purpose of this study to investigate the Whitman-woman relationship and to attempt to answer, so far as this Whitman puzzle may be answered, the question of the effect of women on the Whitman philosophy and the nature of that philosophy concerning women.
Date: 1952
Creator: Grace, Christine Lane Hawkins
Partner: UNT Libraries

Literary and Realistic Influences upon the Women of the Spectator

Description: This study will outline the two great literary genres of character-writing and satire, upon the tradition and practice of which Joseph Addison and Richard Steele based their characters of women in the Spectator. The three-fold purpose of this study is to determine how the Spectator was influenced by, and what it in turn contributed to, the two literary genres, the "Character" of women and satire on women; and to present the social status of the female audience as it existed and as the Spectator sought to improve it.
Date: August 1952
Creator: Perry, Carolyn Oliver
Partner: UNT Libraries

Religion as a Factor in the Literary Career of Nathaniel Hawthorne

Description: The purpose of this study is to evaluate various religious elements in Nathainel Hawthorne's life in relation to his career as a literary artist. The moral seriousness of this author at once strikes us as being something closely akin to religious sentiment, but he refused to endorse any specific dogma or to subscribe to any one organized faith. We know from his work that he had a religion, but his silence leaves ample room for conjecture if we wish to "label" him, or decide which of those religions that he contemplated was most congenial to his nature.
Date: July 1952
Creator: Miller, John Davidson
Partner: UNT Libraries