UNT Theses and Dissertations - 4 Matching Results

Search Results

The Effect of Intensive Remotivation Techniques on Institutionalized Geriatric Mental Patients in a State Mental Hospital

Description: The problem with which this study is concerned is that of ascertaining the effects of intensive Remotivation Techniques on institutionalized geriatric mental patients in terms of their ward behavior, self-concept, and visual-motor perceptions and to compare these with the effects of a similar group experience that does not emphasize patient-staff or patient-patient interactions, and a third group which acts a a control. The investigation is designed to answer or obtain information concerning the following questions: (1) Do institutionalized geriatric mental patients in a state mental hospital manifest measurable changes in terms of their (A) ward behavior as defined as raw scores on the Hospital tment Scale (including interpersonal communication and interpersonal relations; self care and social responsibility; level of participation in ward activities, recreation and work therapy; total score), (B) self-concept as defined as Goodenough raw scores on the Draw-a-Person Test, and (C) awareness of environment as defined as Pascal and Suttell raw scores on the Bender Visual-Motor Gestalt Test, as a result of experiencing the social and verbal interactions of intensive Remotivation Techniques? (2) Is the Remotivation Technique more effective in producing these changes than a similar group experience that does not emphasize social and verbal interactions?
Date: August 1971
Creator: Bovey, John A.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Effects of a Parent Education Program upon Parental Acceptance, Parents' Self-Esteem, and Perceptions of Children's Self-Concept

Description: The problem of this study concerns the effects of a Parent Education Program upon parents' self-esteem, parental acceptance, and perceived self-concept of children. The purposes of this study were to investigate the effects of the Parent Education Program upon parents' self-esteem, parental acceptance, and children's perceived self-concept; and to investigate the relationships between parental acceptance, parents' self-esteem, children's perceived self-concept, and parents', teachers' and counselors' perception of children's self-concept.
Date: August 1974
Creator: Overman, Janet Williams
Partner: UNT Libraries

Intimate Relationships of Adult Children of Alcoholics

Description: Difficulties developing and maintaining intimate relationships are often attributed to adult children of alcoholics (ACAs). However, the focus of the literature has been on those obtaining psychological treatment and has primarily involved clinical impressions. The purpose of this study was to examine intimacy in the close friendships and love relationships of ACAs. Autonomy and intimacy in respondents' families of origin were also analyzed. Comparisons were made between ACAs currently in (n = 59) and not in (n = 53) therapy, and comparisons who had (n = 48) and had not (n = 77) received therapy. Alcoholics were eliminated. It was hypothesized that ACAs would score significantly lower than comparisons on love and friendship intimacy and autonomy and intimacy in their families of origin. Among the ACAs, those in therapy would score lower than those not in therapy. Hypotheses were tested using MANOVAS. ANOVAs were administered where there were significant differences, and Newman-Keuls contrasts further delineated the divergence. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to obtain explanatory data. The two ACA groups seem to represent distinct populations with those not in therapy failing to report intimacy differences previously ascribed to them. While all of the groups were similar in friendship closeness, only the ACAs in therapy had significantly less intimacy in love relationships. Furthermore, clinical ACAs differed from the other groups by having less family of origin health, more physical and sexual abuse, more maternal drinking, more depression, and more suicidal thoughts and behaviors. Family of origin health predicted intimacy in a love relationship. Family characteristics encompassing honesty, empathy and respect, which may or may not involve alcoholism, seemed to create an atmosphere of faulty parenting in the ACA clinical group which may have subsequently affected the child's intimacy in a love relationship. Results of the study support a developmental model and ...
Date: August 1988
Creator: Settle, Karen Ree
Partner: UNT Libraries