UNT Theses and Dissertations - 6 Matching Results

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The Development of the Dominant Female in Selected Stories of F. Scott Fitzgerald

Description: This study of thirty representative short stories from 1912-1941 demonstrates the stages of growth in Fitzgerald's writing which emerged from his own mental development, focusing upon his changing attitudes toward women as he reflects these attitudes in his depictions of the dominant female figures in the stories. The above chronology is then divided into four major blocks; in each block the dominant female illustrates Fitzgerald's concept of women at that particular stage of his life, The stories prove to be integral to the whole of Fitzgerald's writing and deserve to be judged independently of the novels. Furthermore, through an examination of Fitzgerald's short stories, the growth periods and the natural course of his changing attitudes become all the more clear and incisive.
Date: August 1977
Creator: Rose, Elizabeth D.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Edwin Shrake: An Introduction and an Interpretation

Description: The purpose of this investigation is to provide a preliminary critical study of a contemporary Texas novelist. Edwin Shrake. No critical studies on his works have been published; therefore, the sources of data for the paper are limited to the novels and reviews of the books. One chapter is devoted to each of Shrake's major works-- But. Not for Love, Blessed McGill, and Strange Peaches. The plot, characterization, themes, regionalism, and artistic techniques of each novel are studied, and the strengths and weaknesses of each are discussed in order to determine its literary merit. The study concludes that Shrake is a regional novelist whose use of a limited setting does not limit the impact of his books. Through his universal themes, Shrake creates novels that are international in scope.
Date: August 1977
Creator: Van Rheenen, Mary Beth.
Partner: UNT Libraries

God's Estranged Child: Self-Deprecating Images in Edward Taylor's Preparatory Meditations

Description: Throughout his Preparatory Meditations, Edward Taylor used many images to deprecate himself. These images reflected his Puritan religious beliefs rather than an extremely low self-image. The themes of his poetry were taken from the Bible, but they reflected the many duties which befell him in conjunction with his ministry at Westfield. By using images which were most familiar to him and the rhetorical devices of the seventeenth century, Taylor sought to seek God's forgiveness by doing His will--confessing personal guilt, asking for forgiveness, and praising God's mercy. Because the meditations were directed only to God, Taylor never sought to publish them. Like the child he so desperately wanted to be looked upon as, he sought only his father's favor.
Date: August 1977
Creator: Therber, Nancy Eileen
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Influence of the Emblem on Spenser's Presentation of Allegorical Figures in The Faerie Queene

Description: Critics frequently, sometimes irresponsibly, label Spenser's poetry "emblematic" because of the appearance of either striking allegorical figures or moral assertions. This thesis establishes a standard for the application of the term "emblematic": first, by defining those elements which characterize emblems; second, by examining the emblem's cultural milieu; and third, by analyzing the "emblem patterns" that appear in The Faerie Queene. The study concludes that these "emblem patterns" transform the two essential elements of emblems to a literary treatment: the emblem engraving takes the form of a poetic description of allegorical figures or scenes; the didactic poem is condensed to an explicit moral statement. These "emblem patterns," then, can be regarded as reasonable criteria for labelling Spenser's poem "emblematic."
Date: December 1977
Creator: Howard, Patricia W.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Secular Protagonists in Flannery O'Connor's Fiction

Description: Although Flannery O'Connor's fiction reflects her religious point of view, most of her protagonists are secular, either materialists, who value possessions, or rationalists, who value the intellect. During the period 1949 to 1964, when O'Connor was writing, the South was rapidly changing, and those changes are reflected in the shift in emphasis from the materialists in O'Connor's early fiction to the rationalists in the late stories. This study of O'Connor's protagonists follows the chronological order of publication. A close textual analysis of the materialists in Chapter II and of the rationalists in Chapter III supports the conclusion that O'Connor was aware of the growing secularity of the South. Whereas some of her protagonists undergo a religious experience, the majority of her protagonists are thoroughly secular materialists or rationalists.
Date: December 1977
Creator: Norman, Linda C.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Will Made Word and Other Conceptions

Description: This thesis consists of a series of nine poems which deal with the theme of finding a balance between energy and form in life and in poetry. Fourteen miscellaneous poems are also included. In addition, an introduction by the author explains the purpose of the thesis as a whole and explicates the poems in terms of this purpose. The introduction discusses the meaning of each poem and the techniques used to convey its message. Each poem in the series of nine poems is also related to the. overall theme of the series.
Date: December 1977
Creator: Small, Margaret G.
Partner: UNT Libraries