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ABOUT BROWSE FEED
Additional experiments with flat-top wing- body combinations at high supersonic speeds
Flat top wing body configuration effects on aerodynamic characteristics of supersonic aircraft.
Additional fatigue tests on effects of design details in 355-T6 sand-cast aluminum alloy
From Introduction: "Reported herein are results of the additional direct-stress fatigue tests on: (1) a plate-type specimen with cored centrally located hole and (2) 0.300-inch-diameter round polished specimens with various degrees of porosity."
Additional free-flight tests of the rolling effectiveness of several wing-spoiler arrangements at high subsonic, transonic, and supersonic speeds
From Introduction: "The purpose of the present paper is to present results obtained recently relating to the characteristics of a full-span sharp-edge spoiler with an 0.02-chord projection above the wing surface at several chordwise positions and also to the relative effectiveness of the sharp-edge spoiler and a wedge-type spoiler located at the 80-percent-chord line."
Additional measurements of the low-speed static stability of a configuration employing three triangular wing panels and a body of equal length
From Introduction: "The results of an investigation of the low-speed static stability of a simplified model of such an arrangement having one of the airfoils placed vertically on top of the body and the other two as wing panels having negative dihedral are presented in reference 1. In order to provide information for predicting the effects of changes in the basic configuration on the low-speed stability characteristics presented in reference 1, additional measurements have been made."
Additional results in a free-flight investigation of control effectiveness of full-span, 0.2-chord plain ailerons at high subsonic, transonic, and supersonic speeds to determine some effects of wing sweepback, aspect ratio, taper, and section thickne
No Description Available.
Additional results of an investigation at transonic speeds to determine the effects of a heated propulsive jet on the drag characteristics of a series of related afterbodies
From Introduction: "Presented in this report are the basic data obtained from investigation. The data are presented with limited analysis in order to expedite their availability to those concerned with jet-exit-afterbody design."
Additional Results on the Static Longitudinal and Lateral Stability Characteristics of a 0.05-Scale Model of the Convair F2Y-1 Airplane at High Subsonic Speeds
Additional results on the static longitudinal and lateral stability characteristics of a 0.05-scale model of the Convair F2Y-1 water-based fighter airplane were obtained in the Langley high-speed 7- by 10-foot tunnel over a Mach number range of 0.50 to 0.92. The maximum angle-of-attack range (obtained at the lower Mach numbers) was from -2 degrees to 25 degrees. The sideslip-angle range investigated was from -4 degrees to 12 degrees. The investigation included effects of various arrangements of wing fences, leading-edge chord-extensions, and leading-edge notches. Various fuselage fences, spoilers, and a dive brake also were investigated. From overall considerations of lift, drag, and pitching moments, it appears that there were two modifications somewhat superior to any of the others investigated: One was a configuration that employed a full-chord fence and a partial-chord fence located at 0.63 semispan and 0.55 semispan, respectively. The second was a leading-edge chord-extension that extended from 0.68 semispan to 0.85 semispan in combination with a leading-edge notch located at 0.68 semispan. With plus or minus 10 degrees aileron, the estimated wing-tip helix angle was reduced from 0.125 at a Mach number of 0.50 to 0.088 at a Mach number of 0.92, with corresponding rates of roll of 4.0 and 5.2 radians per second. The upper aft fuselage dive brake, when deflected 30 degrees and 60 degrees, reduced the rudder effectiveness about 10 to 20 percent and about 35 to 50 percent, respectively.
Additional Studies of the Stability and Controllability of an Unswept-Wing Vertically Rising Airplane Model in Hovering Flight Including Studies of Various Tethered Landing Techniques
No Description Available.
The adhesion of molten boron oxide to various materials
From Introduction: "The present report evaluates the amount of adhesion existing between the liquid boron oxide and various materials used in engines."
Adhesive and protective characteristics of ceramic coating A-417 and its effect on engine life of forged Refractaloy-26 (AMS 5760) and cast stellite 21 (AMS 5385) turbine blades
The adhesive and protective characteristics of National Bureau of Standards Coating A-417 were investigated, as well as the effect of the coating on the life of forged Refractaloy 26 and cast Stellite 21 turbine blades. Coated and uncoated blades were run in a full-scale J33-9 engine and were subjected to simulated service operations consisting of consecutive 20-minute cycles (15 min at rated speed and approximately 5 min at idle). The ceramic coating adhered well to Refractaloy 26 and Stellite 21 turbine blades operated at 1500 degrees F. The coating also prevented corrosion of the Refractaloy 26, a corrosion-sensitive nickel-base alloy, and of the Stellite 21, a relatively corrosion-resistant cobalt-base alloy. Although the coating prevented corrosion of both alloys, it had no apparent effect on blade life.
Aerodynamic and hydrodynamic characteristics of a deck-inlet multijet water-based-aircraft configuration designed for supersonic flight
From Introduction: "In the present investigation, lift, drag, and pitching moment were determined over a Mach number range 0.6 to 1.42. Smooth-water takeoff and landing stability and resistance were investigated. A brief check of the rough-water spray and behavior was also made."
Aerodynamic and hydrodynamic characteristics of a proposed supersonic multijet water-based hydro-ski aircraft with a variable-incidence wing
From Introduction: "The configuration described in this paper represents one approach to such an airplane and the results of the wind-tunnel and tank evaluations are presented. In the present investigation, the aerodynamic longitudinal characteristics over a Mach number range from 0.6 to 1.97 were obtained."
Aerodynamic and hydrodynamic characteristics of models of some aircraft-towed mine-sweeping devices : TED No. NACA AR 8201
From Introduction: "A study is being conducted by the U.S. Naval Air Development Center to determine the feasibility of several airborne magnetic mine-sweeping methods. The advantages of a satisfactory airborne method are greater safety and speed than are possible with existing surface methods. The three configurations investigated are described in some detail in reference 1 where they are designated as the double Q-sweep, the modified double-catenary sweep and the M-sweep."
Aerodynamic and inlet-flow-field characteristics at a free-stream Mach number of 3.0 for airplanes with circular fuselage cross sections and for two engine locations
No Description Available.
Aerodynamic and lateral-control characteristics of a 1/28-scale model of the Bell X-1 airplane wing-fuselage combination : transonic-bump method
No Description Available.
Aerodynamic characteristics and pressure distributions of a 6-percent-thick 49 degree sweptback wing with blowing over half-span and full-span flaps
From Introduction: "The investigation reported herein was initiated to define further the effects on the aerodynamic characteristics and load distribution of a thin, sweptback wing of a low-pressure blowing system and also to provide information on which to base a more thorough study of a complete airplane configuration."
Aerodynamic characteristics at a Mach number of 1.25 of a 6-percent-thick triangular wing and 6- and 9-percent-thick triangular wings in combination with a fuselage : wing aspect ratio 2.31, biconvex airfoil sections
No Description Available.
Aerodynamic characteristics at a Mach number of 1.38 of four wings of aspect ratio 4 having quarter-chord sweep angles of 0 degrees, 35 degrees, 45 degrees, and 60 degrees
No Description Available.
Aerodynamic Characteristics at a Mach Number of 6.8 of Two Hypersonic Missile Configurations, One with Low-Aspect-Ratio Cruciform Fins and Trailing-Edge Flaps and One with a Flared Afterbody and All-Movable Controls
No Description Available.
Aerodynamic characteristics at a Mach number of 6.8 of two hypersonic missile configurations, one with low-aspect-ratio cruciform fins and trailing-edge flaps and one with a flared afterbody and all-movable controls
No Description Available.
Aerodynamic characteristics at high and low subsonic Mach numbers of four NACA 6-series airfoil sections at angles of attack from -2 to 31 degrees
No Description Available.
Aerodynamic Characteristics at High and Low Subsonic Mach Numbers of the NACA 0012, 64(sub 2)-015, and 64(sub 3)-018 Airfoil Sections at Angles of Attack from -2 Degrees to 30 Degrees
An investigation has been made in the Langley low-turbulence pressure tunnel of the aerodynamic characteristics of the NACA 0012, 64(sub 2)-015, and 64(sub 3)-018 airfoil sections. Data were obtained at Mach numbers from 0.3 to that for tunnel choke, at angles of attack from -2deg to 30deg, and with the surface. of each airfoil smooth-and with roughness applied at the leading edge.The Reynolds numbers of the tests ranged from 0.8 x 10(exp 6) to 4.4 x 10(exp 6). The results are presented as variations of lift, drag, and quarter-chord pitching-moment coefficients with Mach number.
Aerodynamic characteristics at high speeds of a two-blade NACA 10-(3)(062)-045 propeller and of a two-blade NACA 10-(3)(08)-045 propeller
No Description Available.
Aerodynamic characteristics at high speeds of full-scale propellers having Clark Y blade sections
From Introduction: "The single purpose of this paper is to make available the data obtained from tests of these two Clark Y section propellers as quickly as possible with no attempt being made to analyze the results or to compare them with other high-speed-propeller test results."
Aerodynamic Characteristics at High Speeds of Full-Scale Propellers having Different Shank Designs
Tests of two 10-foot-diameter two-blade propellers which differed only in shank design have been made in the Langley 16-foot high-speed tunnel. The propellers are designated by their blade design numbers, NACA 10-(5)(08)-03, which had aerodynamically efficient airfoil shank sections, and NACA l0-(5)(08)-03R which had thick cylindrical shank sections typical of conventiona1 blades, The propellers mere tested on a 2000-horsepower dynamometer through a range of blade-angles from 20deg to 55deg at various rotational speeds and at airspeeds up to 496 miles per hour. The resultant tip speeds obtained simulate actual flight conditions, and the variation of air-stream Mach number with advance ratio is within the range of full-scale constant-speed propeller operation. Both propellers were very efficient, the maximum envelope efficiency being approximately 0,95 for the NACA 10-(5)(08)-03 propeller and about 5 percent less for the NACA 10-(5)(08)-03R propeller. Based on constant power and rotational speed, the efficiency of the NACA 10-(05)(08)-03 propeller was from 2.8 to 12 percent higher than that of the NACA 10-(5)(08)-03R propeller over a range of airspeeds from 225 to 450 miles per hour. The loss in maximum efficiency at the design blade angle for the NACA 10-(5)(08)-03 and 10-(5)(08)-03R propellers vas about 22 and 25 percent, respectively, for an increase in helical tip Mach number from 0.70 to 1.14.
Aerodynamic characteristics at Mach number 4.04 of a rectangular wing of aspect ratio 1.33 having a 6-percent-thick circular-arc profile and a 30-percent-chord full-span trailing-edge flap
From Introduction: "The present report gives results at a Mach number of 4.04 of the part of the program concerned with flap controls at Mach numbers from 1.62 to 6.9."
Aerodynamic characteristics at Mach number of 2.01 of two cruciform missile configurations having 70 degree delta wings with length-diameter ratios of 14.8 and 17.7 with several canard controls
No Description Available.
Aerodynamic characteristics at Mach number of 4.06 of a typical supersonic airplane model using body and vertical-tail wedges to improve directional stability
No Description Available.
Aerodynamic characteristics at Mach numbers 2.36 and 2.87 of an airplane configuration having a cambered arrow wing with a 75 degree swept leading edge
No Description Available.
Aerodynamic characteristics at Mach numbers from 0.7 to 1.75 of a four-engine swept-wing airplane configuration as obtained from a rocket-propelled model test
No Description Available.
Aerodynamic characteristics at Mach numbers from 2.5 to 3.5 of a canard bomber configuration designed for supersonic cruise flight
No Description Available.
Aerodynamic characteristics at Mach numbers of 1.61 and 2.01 of various tip controls on the wing panel of a 0.05-scale model of a Martin XASM-N-7 (Bullpup) missile : TED No. NACA AD 3106
No Description Available.
Aerodynamic characteristics at subcritical and supercritical Mach numbers of two airfoil sections having sharp leading edges and extreme rearward positions of maximum thickness
From Introduction: "A 12-percent-chord-thick wedge section and a reversed NACA 0012 section were chosen for these tests as they are representative of sections having no boat tailing and appreciable boat tailing (i.e., blunt and rounded trailing edges, respectively), and the results of this investigation are compared with those obtained from a previous investigation of the NACA 0012 section. Conclusions are drawn regarding the relative merits of the two unconventional sections and the conventional section in transonic speed range."
Aerodynamic characteristics at subsonic and supersonic Mach numbers of a thin triangular wing of aspect ratio 2 I : maximum thickness at 20 percent of the chord
From Summary: "This report presents the results of a wind-tunnel investigation conducted to determine the effects of Mach number on the aerodynamic characteristics of a wing of triangular plan form."
Aerodynamic characteristics at subsonic and supersonic Mach numbers of a thin triangular wing of aspect ratio 2 II : maximum thickness at midchord
The lift, drag, and pitching-moment characteristics of a triangular wing, having an aspect ratio of 2 and a symmetrical double-wedge profile of 5-percent-chord maximum thickness at midchord, have been evaluated from wind-tunnel tests at Mach numbers from 0.50 to 0.975 and from 1.09 to 1.49 and at Reynolds numbers ranging from 0.67 to 0.85 million. The lift, drag, and pitching-moment coefficients of the triangular wing with a leading-edge sweepback of approximately 63 degrees did not exhibit the irregular variations with Mach number at high subsonic and low supersonic Mach numbers that are characteristic of unswept wings. The lift-curve slope increased steadily with Mach number below unity and declined slowly beyond the Mach number of 1.13. A substantial rise in the minimum drag coefficient occurred between Mach numbers of 0.95 and 1.20 with an associated reduction in the maximum lift-drag ratio. The aerodynamic center shifted rearward toward the centroid of area of the wing with increasing Mach number below 0.975; whereas above 1.09 it coincided with the centroid.
Aerodynamic characteristics at subsonic and transonic speeds of a 42.7 degree sweptback wing model having an aileron with finite trailing-edge thickness
No Description Available.
Aerodynamic characteristics at supersonic speeds of a series of wing-body combinations having cambered wings with an aspect ratio of 3.5 and a taper ratio of 0.2 : effect at M = 2.01 of nacelle shape and position on the aerodynamic characteristics in
No Description Available.
Aerodynamic characteristics at supersonic speeds of a series of wing-body combinations having cambered wings with an aspect ratio of 3.5 and a taper ratio of 0.2 : effects of sweep angle and thickness ratio on the aerodynamic characteristics in pitch
No Description Available.
Aerodynamic characteristics at supersonic speeds of a series of wing-body combinations having cambered wings with an aspect ratio of 3.5 and a taper ratio of 0.2 : effects of sweep angle and thickness ratio on the static lateral stability characteris
No Description Available.
Aerodynamic characteristics at transonic and supersonic speeds of a rocket-propelled airplane configuration having a 52.5 degree delta wing and a low, swept horizontal tail
No Description Available.
Aerodynamic characteristics at transonic speeds of a 60 degree delta wing equipped with a constant-chord flap-type control with and without an unshielded horn balance : transonic-bump method
No Description Available.
Aerodynamic characteristics at transonic speeds of a 69 degree delta wing with a triangular plan-form control having a skewed hinge axis and an overhang balance : transonic-bump method
From Introduction: "Presented in this paper are the results of an investigation of a semispan model of a delta wing with 60^o sweepback at the leading edge which was equipped with a large triangular control having an overhang balance mounted on a skewed hinge axis. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of a delta wing with a control which was designed to provide aerodynamic balance at zero control deflection based on the span load distribution of reference 1."
The aerodynamic characteristics at transonic speeds of a model with a 45 degree sweptback wing, including the effect of leading edge slats and a low horizontal tail
No Description Available.
Aerodynamic characteristics at transonic speeds of a tapered 45 degree sweptback wing of aspect ratio 3 having a full-span flap type of control with overhang balance : transonic-bump method
From Introduction: "This paper presents the aerodynamic characteristics of low-aspect-ratio sweptback wing having a full-span flap type of control employing an overhanging balance of 50 percent of the flap chord.The main purpose of this investigation was to determine if overhang balances are an effective means of reducing the hinge moments of flap type of controls at transonic speeds."
Aerodynamic characteristics at transonic speeds of a wing having a 45 degree sweep, aspect ratio 8, taper ratio 0.45, and airfoil sections varying from the NACA 63A010 section at the root to the NACA 63A006 section at the tip.
No Description Available.
The aerodynamic characteristics at transonic speeds of an all-movable, tapered, 45 degree sweptback, aspect-ratio-4 tail deflected about a skewed hinge axis and equipped with an inset unbalancing tab
From Introduction: "The present investigation presents the lift and moment characteristics of an aspect-ratio-4.0 tail, sweptback 45^o at the quarter-chord line and pivoted about an axis sweptback 55.5^o and passing through the leading edge of the root-chord line."
The aerodynamic characteristics at transonic speeds of an all-movable, tapered, 45 degrees sweptback, aspect-ratio-4 tail surface deflected about a skewed hinge axis
From Introduction: "The purpose of the present paper was to determine whether the characteristics about a skewed axis could be predicted from data about the normal angle-of-attack axis, and whether such a configuration offered any aerodynamic advantages over the conventional hinge location normal to the pane of symmetry."
Aerodynamic characteristics extended to high angles of attack at transonic speeds of a small-scale 0 degree sweep wing, 45 degree sweptback wing, and 60 degree delta wing
No Description Available.
Aerodynamic Characteristics in Pitch and Sideslip at High Subsonic Speeds of a 1/14-Scale Model of the Grumman XF104 Airplane with Wing Sweepback of 42.5 Degrees
An investigation has been made at high subsonic speeds of the aerodynamic'characteristics in pitch and sideslip of a l/l4-scale model of the Grumman XF10F airplane with a wing sweepback angle of 42.5. The longitudinal stability characteristics (with the horizontal tail fixed) indicate a pitch-up near the stall; however, this was somewhat alleviated by the addition of fins to the side of the fuselage below the horizontal tail. The original model configuration became directionally unstable for small sideslip angles at Mach numbers above 0.8; however, the instability was eliminated by several different modifications.
The Aerodynamic Characteristics in Pitch of a 1/15-Scale Model of the Grumman F11F-1 Airplane at Mach Numbers of 1.41, 1.61, and 2.01, TED No. NACA DE 390
Tests have been made in the Langley 4- by 4-foot supersonic pressure tunnel at Mach numbers of 1.41, 1.61, and 2.01 to determine the static longitudinal stability and control characteristics of various arrangements of the Grumman F11F-1 airplane. Tests were made of the complete model and various combinations of its component parts and, in addition, the effects of various body modifications, a revised vertical tail, and wing fences on the longitudinal characteristics were determined. The results indicate that for a horizontal-tail incidence of -10 deg the trim lift coefficient varied from 0.29 at a Mach number of 1.61 to 0.23 at a Mach number of 2.01 with a corresponding decrease in lift-drag trim from 3.72 to 3.15. Stick-position instability was indicated in the low-supersonic-speed range. A photographic-type nose modification resulted in slightly higher values of minimum drag coefficient but did not significantly affect the static stability or lift-curve slope. The minimum drag coefficient for the complete model with the production nose remained essentially constant at 0.047 throughout the Mach number range investigated.