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Tank Tests of a 1/7-Size Dynamic Model of the Grumman XJR2F-1 Amphibian to Determine the Effect of Slotted- and Split-Type Flaps on Take-Off Stability - NACA Model 212, TED No. NACA 2378

Description: Additional tests of a 1/7-size model of the Grumman XJR2F-1 amphibian were made in Langley tank no. 1 to compare the behavior during take-off of the model equipped with split- and slotted-type flaps. The slotted flag had a large effect on locating the forward center-of-gravity limits for stable take-offs. Stable take-offs within the normal operating range of positions of the center of gravity could be made with the split flaps deflected 45deg or with the slotted flaps deflected less than 20deg. At flap deflections required for similar take-off stability, the use of split-flaps resulted lower take-off speeds than the use of slotted flaps. An increase in forward acceleration from 1.1 to 4.8 feet per second per second moved the center-of-gravity limit forward approximately 3-percent mean aerodynamic chord.
Date: February 6, 1947
Creator: Land, Norman S. & Zeck, Howard
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Smooth-Water Landing Stability and Rough-Water Landing and Take-Off Behavior of a 1/13-Scale Model of the Consolidated Vultee Skate 7 Seaplane, TED No. NACA DE 338

Description: A model of the Consolidated Vultee Aircraft Corporation Skate 7 seaplane was tested in Langley tank no. 2. Presented without discussion in this paper are landing stability in smooth water, maximum normal accelerations occurring during rough-water landings, and take-off behavior in waves.
Date: September 8, 1949
Creator: McKann, Robert F.; Coffee, Claude W. & Arabian, Donald D.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Rocket-Model Investigation of the Longitudinal Stability, Drag, and Duct Performance Characteristics of the North American MX-770 (X-10) Missile at Mach Numbers from 0.80 to 1.70

Description: A free-flight 0.12-scale rocket-boosted model of the North American MX-770 (X-10) missile has been tested in flight by the Pilotless Aircraft Research Division of the Langley Aeronautical Laboratory. Drag, longitudinal stability, and duct performance data were obtained at Mach numbers from 0.8 to 1.7 covering a Reynolds number range of about 9 x 10(exp 6) to 24 x 10(exp 6) based on wing mean aerodynamic chord. The lift-curve slope, static stability, and damping-in-pitch derivatives showed similar variations with Mach number, the parameters increasing from subsonic values in the transonic region and decreasing in the supersonic region. The variations were for the most part fairly smooth. The aerodynamic center of the configuration shifted rearward in the transonic region and moved forward gradually in the supersonic region. The pitching effectiveness of the canard control surfaces was maintained throughout the flight speed range, the supersonic values being somewhat greater than the subsonic. Trim values of angle of attack and lift coefficient changed abruptly in the transonic region, the change being associated with variations in the out-of-trim pitching moment, control effectiveness, and aerodynamic-center travel in this speed range. Duct total-pressure recovery decreased with increase in free-stream Mach number and the values were somewhat less than normal-shock recovery. Minimum drag data indicated a supersonic drag coefficient about twice the subsonic drag coefficient and a drag-rise Mach number of approximately 0.90. Base drag was small subsonically but was about 25 percent of the minimum drag of the configuration supersonically.
Date: September 16, 1953
Creator: Bond, Aleck C. & Swanson, Andrew G.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Rocket-Model Measurements of Zero-Lift Damping in Roll of the Bell MX-776 Missile at Mach Numbers from 0.6 to 1.56

Description: The zero-lift damping in roll of the Bell MX-776 missile has been measured by a sting-mounted rocket-model technique at Mach numbers from 0.6 to 1.56. The damping-in-roll data, in general, show no unusual variation with Mach number. Aileron rolling-moment effectiveness derived from these data and previously obtained rolling-effectiveness data appear reasonable,.
Date: December 31, 1953
Creator: Bland, William N., Jr. & Purser, Paul E.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Resistance and Spray Characteristics of a 1/13-Scale Model of the Consolidated Vultee Skate 7 Seaplane, TED No. NACA DE 338

Description: A model of a Consolidated Vultee Aircraft Corporation Skate 7 sea-plane:was tested in Langley tank no= 2. Resistance data, 'spray photographs, and underwater photographs,are given in this report without discussion.
Date: January 1, 1949
Creator: McKann, Robert E.; Coffee, Claude W. & Arabian, Donald D.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Free-Flight Tests of 1/9-Scale Convair YF-102 Airplane Wings at Transonic and Supersonic Speeds to Investigate the Possibility of Flutter

Description: Free-flight tests in the transonic and supersonic speed ranges utilizing rocket-propelled models have been made on two pairs of 1/9-scale Convair YF-102 airplane wings with elevons to investigate the possibility of flutter . These wings had modified 60 deg delta plan forms with the trailing edge swept forward 5 deg. The aspect ratio of two exposed wing panels was 2.19 and the wings had NACA 0004-65 (modified) airfoil sections. The model wings and elevons were dynamic-scale models at sea level of the full-scale wings at 20,000 feet. The first set of wings developed elevon buzz near a Mach number of 1 during both power-on and coasting flight at amplitudes of equal to or greater than +/-4 deg.. The second set of wings did not develop the elevon buzz experienced by the first set but, as the model reached the maximum speed of the test (Mach number 1.93), one or both of the wings suddenly failed, possibly as a result of aerodynamic heating or high stresses imposed on the wings at separation from the booster. No flutter was experienced during either flight.
Date: January 1, 1955
Creator: O'Kelly, Burke R.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Free-Flight Tests of 0.11-Scale North American F-100 Airplane Wings to Investigate the Possibility of Flutter in Transonic Speed Range at Varying Angles of Attack

Description: Free-flight tests in the transonic speed range utilizing rocketpropelled models have been made on three pairs of 0.11-scale North American F-100 airplane wings having an aspect ratio of 3.47, a taper ratio of 0.308, 45 degree sweepback at the quarter-chord line, and thickness ratios of 31 and 5 percent to investigate the possibility of flutte r. Data from tests of two other rocket-propelled models which accidentally fluttered during a drag investigation of the North American F-100 airplane are also presented. The first set of wings (5 percent thick) was tested on a model which was disturbed in pitch by a moving tail and reached a maximum Mach number of 0.85. The wings encountered mild oscillations near the first - bending frequency at high lift coefficients. The second set of wings 9 percent thick was tested up to a maximum Mach number of 0.95 at (2) angles of attack provided by small rocket motors installed in the nose of the model. No oscillations resembling flutter were encountered during the coasting flight between separation from the booster and sustainer firing (Mach numbers from 0.86 to 0.82) or during the sustainer firing at accelerations of about 8g up to the maximum Mach number of the test (0.95). The third set of wings was similar to the first set and was tested up to a maximum Mach number of 1.24. A mild flutter at frequencies near the first-bending frequency of the wings was encountered between a Mach number of 1.15 and a Mach number of 1.06 during both accelerating and coasting flight. The two drag models, which were 0.ll-scale models of the North American F-100 airplane configuration, reached a maximum Mach number of 1.77. The wings of these models had bending and torsional frequencies which were 40 and 89 percent, respectively, of the calculated ...
Date: January 1, 1954
Creator: O'Kelly, Burke R.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Acceleration Characteristics of R-3350 Engine Equipped with NACA Injection Impeller

Description: Qualitative investigations have shown that use of the NACA injection impeller with the R-3350 engine increases the inertia of the fuel-injection system and, when the standard fuel-metering system is used, this increase in inertia results in poor engine acceleration characteristics. This investigation was therefore undertaken to determine whether satisfactory acceleration characteristics of the engine equipped with the injection impeller could be obtained by simple modifications to the fuel-monitoring system. The engine was operated with two types of carburetor; namely, a hydraulic-metering carburetor incorporating a vacuum-operated accelerating pump and a direct-metering carburetor having a throttle-actuated accelerating pump. The vacuum-operated accelerating pump of the hydraulic-metering carburetor was modified to produce satisfactory accelerations by supplementing the standard air chamber with an additional 75-cubic spring. The throttle-actuated accelerating pump of the direct-metering carburetor was modified to produce satisfactory accelerations by replacing the standard 0.028-inch-diameter bleed in the load-compensator balance line with a smaller bleed of 0.0225-inch diameter. The results of this investigation indicated that both carburetors can be easily modified to produce satisfactory acceleration characteristics of the engine and no definite choice between the types of carburetor and accelerating pump can be made. Use of the direct-metering carburetor, however, probably resulted in better fuel distribution to the cylinders during the acceleration period and reduced the backfire hazard because all the fuel is introduced through the injection impeller.
Date: January 8, 1947
Creator: Hickel, Robert O. & Snider, William E.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Acceleration of high-pressure-ratio single-spool turbojet engine as determined from component performance characteristics I : effect of air bleed at compressor outlet

Description: An analytical investigation was made to determine from component performance characteristics the effect of air bleed at the compressor outlet on the acceleration characteristics of a typical high-pressure-ratio single-spool turbojet engine. Consideration of several operating lines on the compressor performance map with two turbine-inlet temperatures showed that for a minimum acceleration time the turbine-inlet temperature should be the maximum allowable, and the operating line on the compressor map should be as close to the surge region as possible throughout the speed range. Operation along such a line would require a continuously varying bleed area. A relatively simple two-step area bleed gives only a small increase in acceleration time over a corresponding variable-area bleed. For the modes of operation considered, over 84 percent of the total acceleration time was required to accelerate through the low-speed range ; therefore, better low-speed compressor performance (higher pressure ratios and efficiencies) would give a significant reduction in acceleration time.
Date: March 10, 1953
Creator: Rebeske, John J , Jr & Rohlik, Harold E
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department