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The Measurement of Fuel-Air Ratio by Analysis of the Oxidized Exhaust Gas

Description: An investigation was made to determine a method of measuring fuel-air ratio that could be used for test purposes in flight and for checking conventional equipment in the laboratory. Two single-cylinder test engines equipped with typical commercial engine cylinders were used. The fuel-air ratio of the mixture delivered to the engines was determined by direct measurement of the quantity of air and of fuel supplied and also by analysis of the oxidized exhaust gas and of the normal exhaust gas. Five fuels were used: gasoline that complied with Army-Navy Fuel Specification, No. AN-VV-F-781 and four mixtures of this gasoline with toluene, benzene, and xylene. The method of determining the fuel-air ratio described in this report involves the measurement of the carbon-dioxide content of the oxidized exhaust gas and the use of graphs or the presented equation. This method is considered useful in aircraft, in the field, or in the laboratory for a range of fuel-air ratios from 0.047 to 0.124.
Date: October 1, 1943
Creator: Memm, J. Lawrence, Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Summary of Airfoil Data

Description: Recent airfoil data for both flight and wind-tunnel tests have been collected and correlated insofar as possible. The flight data consist largely of drag measurements made by the wake-survey method. Most of the data on airfoil section characteristics were obtained in the Langley two-dimensional low-turbulence pressure tunnel. Detail data necessary for the application of NACA 6-serles airfoils to wing design are presented in supplementary figures, together with recent data for the NACA 24-, 44-, and 230-series airfoils. The general methods used to derive the basic thickness forms for NACA 6- and 7-series airfoils and their corresponding pressure distributions are presented. Data and methods are given for rapidly obtaining the approximate pressure distributions for NACA four-digit, five-digit, 6-, and 7-series airfoils. The report includes an analysis of the lift, drag, pitching-moment, and critical-speed characteristics of the airfoils, together with a discussion of the effects of surface conditions. Available data on high-lift devices are presented. Problems associated with lateral-control devices, leading-edge air intakes, and interference are briefly discussed. The data indicate that the effects of surface condition on the lift and drag characteristics are at least as large as the effects of the airfoil shape and must be considered in airfoil selection and the prediction of wing characteristics. Airfoils permitting extensive laminar flow, such as the NACA 6-series airfoils, have much lower drag coefficients at high speed and cruising lift coefficients than earlier types-of airfoils if, and only if, the wing surfaces are sufficiently smooth and fair. The NACA 6-series airfoils also have favorable critical-speed characteristics and do not appear to present unusual problems associated with the application of high-lift and lateral-control devices. Much of the data given in the NACA Advance Confidential Report entitled "Preliminary Low-Drag-Airfoil and Flap Data from Tests at Large Reynolds Number and Low Turbulence," by Eastman N. ...
Date: March 1, 1945
Creator: Stivers, Louis S.; Abbott, Ira H. & von Doenhoff, Albert E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Addition of heat to a compressible fluid in motion

Description: From Introduction: "The purpose of this report is to summarize, without extended proofs, the results of a study of a simplified model of nonadiabiatic, compressible fluid flow, both subsonic and supersonic, and to state these results in a form that will make them immediately useful in providing a theoretical background for current technical problems of high-speed combustion.
Date: February 1945
Creator: Hicks, Bruce L
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effect of Water-Alcohol Injection and Maximum Economy Spark Advance on Knock-Limited Performance and Fuel Economy of a Large Air-Cooled Cylinder

Description: An investigation was conducted to determine the effect of a coolant solution of 25 percent ethyl alcohol, 25 percent methyl alcohol, and 50 percent water by volume and maximum-economy spark advance on knock-limited performance and fuel economy of a large air-cooled cylinder. The knock-limited performance of the cylinder at engine speeds of 2100 and 2500 rpm was determined for coolant-fuel ratios of 0.0, 0.2, and 0.4. The effect of water-alcohol injection on fuel economy was determined in constant charge-air flow tests. The tests were conducted at a spark advance of 20 deg B.T.C. and maximum-economy spark advance.
Date: August 1, 1945
Creator: Heinicke, Orville H. & Vandeman, Jack E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An Experimental Investigation of Flow Conditions in the Vicinity of an NACA D(Sub S)-Type Cowling

Description: Data are presented of the flow conditions in the vicinity of an NACA D sub S -type cowling. Tests were made of a 1/2 scale-nacelle model at inlet-velocity ratios ranging from 0.23 to 1.02 and angles of attack from 6 deg to 10 deg. The velocity and direction of flow in the vertical plane of symmetry of the cowling were determined from orifices and tufts installed on a board aligned with the flow. Diagrams showing velocity ratio contours and lines of constant flow angles are given.
Date: August 1, 1946
Creator: Bryant, Rosemary P. & Boswinkle, Robert W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department