Technical Report Archive and Image Library (TRAIL) - 5 Matching Results

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Report on Commercial Air Transportation Activities in England, France, Germany and Holland

Description: The following pages present a review of the air transportation activities of England, France, Germany and Holland, based on an inspection trip during the summer of 1924. The different components described include operating companies, nature of transportation services, air traffic, flying equipment, government relations, and general remarks.
Date: June 1925
Creator: Van Zandt, J. Parker
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High velocity wind tunnels : their application to ballistics, aerodynamics, and aeronautics

Description: The object of this article is to set forth the particular properties of swiftly-moving air, how these affect the installation of a wind tunnel, the experimental results already obtained, the possible applications of such a tunnel, and what can be easily accomplished at the present time.
Date: June 1925
Creator: Huguenard, E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Air forces on airfoils moving faster than sound

Description: We are undertaking the task of computing the air forces on a slightly cambered airfoil in the absence of friction and with an infinite aspect ratio. We also assume in advance that the leading edge is very sharp and that its tangent lies in the direction of motion.
Date: June 1925
Creator: Ackeret, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The "Navigraph"

Description: "Commander Le Prieur, whose flight experience in a low-speed seaplane we related in our number of September 27, 1924, invented, four years ago, an instrument destined to render very great service to aviators, namely, the "navigraph", designed to correct errors of orientation due to the effect of the winds during flight" (p. 1).
Date: June 1925
Creator: Le Prieur, Ives
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Drift of an Aircraft Guided Towards It's Destination by Directional Receiving of Radio Signals Transmitted From the Ground

Description: Following a curved path increases the distance to be flown, and a type of radio navigation that forces the adoption of such a path is therefore less efficient than one that marks out a definite straight line between the point of departure and the intended destination, and holds the airplane to that line. To determine the loss of efficiency resulting from curvature of the path, calculations were made for two particular cases by the method of step-by-step integration. The calculations were based on the assumption that the pilot makes straightforward use of his radio for navigation and makes no allowance for drift.
Date: June 1925
Creator: Warner, Edward P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department