Technical Report Archive and Image Library (TRAIL) - 56 Matching Results

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Interference tests on NACA pitot tubes

Description: In connection with the standardization of instruments used in the wind tunnel, this investigation was undertaken to determine the nature and magnitude of the errors inherent in the measurement of air speed by a pitot tube when the instrument is mounted close to some other body. The mounting of the instrument in proximity to some other body is so frequent in flight and in wind tunnel research that it seemed advisable to investigate thoroughly the magnitude of the possible errors caused by such proximity. The results of this investigation will facilitate comparisons of the errors due to interference which have been reduced to percentages of the air-speed readings obtained under conditions of no interference.
Date: January 1, 1925
Creator: Reid, Elliott G
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The influence of the form of a wooden beam on its stiffness and strength III : stresses in wood members subjected to combined column and beam action

Description: The general purpose in this study was to determine the stresses in a wooden member subjected to combined beam and column action. What may be considered the specific purpose, as it relates more directly to the problem of design, was to determine the particular stress that obtains at maximum load which, for combined loading, does not occur simultaneously with maximum stress.
Date: January 1, 1925
Creator: Newlin, J A & Trayer, G W
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The "Navigraph"

Description: Commander Le Prieur, whose flight experience in a low-speed seaplane we related in our number of September 27, 1924, invented, four years ago, an instrument destined to render very great service to aviators, namely, the "navigraph", designed to correct errors of orientation due to the effect of the winds during flight.
Date: June 1, 1925
Creator: Le Prieur, Ives
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The problem of fuel measurement : the Schiske "Konsummeter"

Description: Any measuring device, which immediately indicates the rate of fuel consumption in the desired units, has the advantage of saving considerable time and fuel, besides facilitating the adjustment of the carburetor. The Schiske "Konsummeter" (made by the "PS-Vergaser and Apparatebau A. G.") was designed from the above viewpoint.
Date: May 1, 1925
Creator: Praetorius, K. R. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Law of similitude for the surface resistance of lacquered planes moving in a straight line through water

Description: The proof of the validity of the Reynolds law of similitude for the surface resistance of planes has been developed with an accuracy hitherto unattained and for a large range of lengths and speeds. It has been shown that, in addition to the form resistance, the resistance of the longitudinal edges must be taken into account.
Date: April 1, 1925
Creator: Gebers, Friedrich
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Latecoere Air Lines

Description: This article presents the observations of the authors on an inspection trip of the Latecoere Air Lines routes from Southern France into North Africa.
Date: August 1, 1925
Creator: Van Zandt, J Parker
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The effect of changes in compression ratio upon engine performance

Description: This report is based upon engine tests made at the Bureau of Standards during 1920, 1921, 1922, and 1923. The majority of these tests were of aviation engines and were made in the Altitude Laboratory. For a small portion of the work a single cylinder experimental engine was used. This, however, was operated only at sea-level pressures. The report shows that an increase in break horsepower and a decrease in the pounds of fuel used per brake horsepower hour usually results from an increase in compression ratio. This holds true at least up to the highest ratio investigated, 14 to 1, provided there is no serious preignition or detonation at any ratio. To avoid preignition and detonation when employing high-compression ratios, it is often necessary to use some fuel other than gasoline. It has been found that the consumption of some of these fuels in pounds per brake horsepower hour is so much greater than the consumption of gasoline that it offsets the decrease derived from the use of the high-compression ratio. The changes in indicated thermal efficiency with changes in compression ratio are in close agreement with what would be anticipated from a consideration of the air cycle efficiencies at the various ratios. In so far as these tests are concerned there is no evidence that a change in compression ratio produces an appreciable, consistent change in friction horsepower, volumetric efficiency, or in the range of fuel-air ratios over which the engine can operate. The ratio between the heat loss to the jacket water and the heat converted into brake horsepower or indicated horsepower decreases with increase in compression ratio. (author).
Date: January 1, 1925
Creator: Sparrow, Stanwood W
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Computation of cantilever airplane wings

Description: The purpose of this treatise is, first of all, the determination of the effect of variously loaded spars on one another, since the neglect of this effect would present an economically very unfavorable computation method. The system of spars and cross-bars alone (whether solid or built-up) does not matter at first, the original assumption being that the spars are rigidly braced by the cross-bars.
Date: July 1, 1925
Creator: Thalau, K
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

European commercial aeronautics

Description: During the months of June to September, 1924, I personally visited the principal airports of Europe and traveled as a passenger some 6500 air miles on English, French, Romanian, Polish, German and Dutch air lines in order to investigate the development of commercial aviation abroad. The results of the investigation are embodied in a series of reports, of which a summary of the general findings is given below.
Date: May 1, 1925
Creator: Van Zandt, J Parker
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Some problems on the lift and rolling moment of airplane wings

Description: This report deals with the application of the airfoil and twisted wing theory to the calculation of the lift and rolling moment of airplane wings. Most of the results arrived at are strictly true only for wings of elliptic plan form. The investigation aims to give some indications of the accuracy with which the results can be applied to the wing forms in actual use.
Date: January 1, 1925
Creator: Scarborough, James B
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Standardization tests of NACA no. 1 wind tunnel

Description: The tests described in this report were made in the 5-foot atmospheric wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, at Langley Field. The primary objective of collecting data on the characteristics of this tunnel for comparison with those of others throughout the world, in order that, in the future, the results of tests made in all the principle laboratories may be interpreted, compared, and coordinated on a basis of scientifically established relationships, a process hitherto impossible due to the lack of comparable data. The work includes tests of a disk, spheres, cylinders, and airfoils, explorations of the test section for static pressure and velocity distribution, and determination of the variations of air flow direction throughout the operating range of the tunnel. (author).
Date: January 1, 1925
Creator: Reid, Elliott G
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Relation of "Lilienthal effect" to dynamic soaring flight

Description: In this article, the phenomena of the upward component in the case of flat surfaces will be referred to as the "Lilienthal effect." The Lilienthal effect will be distinguished from the Knoller-Betz effect which is explained by means of vertical wind oscillations, at the basis of which, however, there lie air motions which the Lilienthal effect could not produce. It will be shown that the same cause, which can produce the Lilienthal effect on flat airfoils, considerably strengthens the thrust due to the Knoller-Betz effect.
Date: July 1, 1925
Creator: Fick, Roderich
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The effects of shielding the tips of airfoils

Description: Tests have recently been made at Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory to ascertain whether the aerodynamic characteristics of an airfoil might be substantially improved by imposing certain limitations upon the air flow about its tips. All of the modified forms were slightly inferior to the plain airfoil at small lift coefficients: however, by mounting thin plates, in planes perpendicular to the span, at the wing tips, the characteristics were improved throughout the range above three-tenths of the maximum lift coefficient. With this form of limitation the detrimental effect was slight; at the higher lift coefficients there resulted a considerable reduction of induced drag and consequently, of power required for sustentation. The slope of the curve of lift versus angle of attack was increased.
Date: January 1, 1925
Creator: Reid, Elliott G
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Correcting horsepower measurements to a standard temperature

Description: This report discusses the relation between the temperature of the air at the entrance to the carburetor and the power developed by the engine. Its scope is limited to a consideration of the range of temperatures likely to result from changes of season, locality, or altitude, since its primary aim is the finding of a satisfactory basis for correcting power measurements to a standard temperature. The tests upon which this report is based were made upon aviation engines in the Altitude Laboratory of the Bureau of Standards. From the results of over 1,600 tests it is concluded that if calculations be based on the assumption that the indicated horsepower of an engine varies inversely as the square root of the absolute temperature of the carburetor air the values obtained will check closely experimental measurements. The extent to which this relationship would be expected from theoretical considerations is discussed and some suggestions are given relative to the use of this relationship in correcting horsepower measurements. (author).
Date: January 1, 1925
Creator: Sparrow, Stanwood W
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Relation of fuel-air ratio to engine performance

Description: The tests upon which this report is based were made at the Bureau of Standards between October 1919 and May 1923. From these it is concluded that: (1) with gasoline as a fuel, maximum power is obtained with fuel-air mixtures of from 0.07 to 0.08 pound of fuel per pound of air; (2) maximum power is obtained with approximately the same ratio over the range of air pressures and temperatures encountered in flight; (3) nearly minimum specific fuel consumption is secured by decreasing the fuel content of the charge until the power is 95 per cent of its maximum value. Presumably this information is of most direct value to the carburetor engineer. A carburetor should supply the engine with a suitable mixture. This report discusses what mixtures have been found suitable for various engines. It also furnishes the engine designer with a basis for estimating how much greater piston displacement an engine operating with a maximum economy mixture should have than one operating with a maximum power mixture in order for both to be capable of the same power development.
Date: January 1, 1925
Creator: Sparrow, Stanwood W
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Strength calculations on airplanes

Description: Every strength calculation, including those on airplanes, must be preceded by a determination of the forces to be taken into account. In the following discussion, it will be assumed that the magnitudes of these forces are known and that it is only a question of how, on the basis of these known forces, to meet the prescribed conditions on the one hand and the practical requirements on the other.
Date: December 1, 1925
Creator: Baumann, A
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Theory of flapping flight

Description: Before attempting to construct a human-powered aircraft, the aviator will first try to post himself theoretically on the possible method of operating the flapping wings. This report will present a graphic and mathematical method, which renders it possible to determine the power required, so far as it can be done on the basis of the wing dimensions. We will first consider the form of the flight path through the air. The simplest form is probably the curve of ordinary wave motion. After finding the flight curve, we must next determine the change in the angle of attack while passing through the different phases of the wave.
Date: October 1, 1925
Creator: Lippisch, Alexander
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wire suspensions in wind tunnel experiments

Description: The elimination of the rigid supports for models and their replacement by wires constitute a great improvement by rendering negligible the interactions of support. There are disadvantages to wire, namely, the aerodynamic resistance is very large and their use is rather difficult because the whole suspension lacks rigidity and easily becomes distorted. We will here investigate the nature of these distortions, evaluate the errors they entail and describe the methods for taking account of or avoiding them.
Date: December 1, 1925
Creator: Kerneis, Jean
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The light airplane: modern theoretical aerodynamics as applied to light airplane design with a series of charts

Description: T.M. 311 gave a short outline of modern theoretical aerodynamics as applied to light airplane design. This discussion may have been somewhat obscure to the nontechnical reader. A series of charts or curves should serve to clear up such obscurity as well as to more definitely emphasize those quantities most important for each flight characteristic.
Date: August 1, 1925
Creator: Driggs, Ivan H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department