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Boundary-Layer-Transition Measurements in Full-Scale Flight

Description: Chemical sublimation has been employed for boundary-layer-flow visualization on the wings of a supersonic fighter airplane in level flight at speeds near a Mach number of 2.0. The tests have shown that laminar flow can be obtained over extensive areas of the wing with practical wing-surface conditions. In addition to the flow visualization tests, a method of continuously monitoring the conditions of the boundary layer has been applied to flight testing, using heated temperature resistance gages installed in a Fiberglas "glove" installation on one wing. Tests were conducted at speeds from a Mach number of 1.2 to a Mach number of 2.0, at altitudes from 35,000 feet to 56,000 feet. Data obtained at all angles of attack, from near 0 deg to near 10 deg, have shown that the maximum transition Reynolds number on the upper surface of the wing varies from about 2.5 x 10(exp 6) at a Mach number of 1.2 to about 4 x 10(exp 6) at a Mach number of 2.0. On the lower surface, the maximum transition Reynolds number varies from about 2 x 10(exp 6) at a Mach number of 1.2 to about 8 x 10(exp 6) at a Mach number of 2.0.
Date: July 28, 1958
Creator: Banner, Richard D.; McTigue, John G. & Petty, Gilbert, Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Aerodynamic characteristics of a 0.04956-scale model of the Convair F-102A airplane at Mach numbers of 1.41, 1.61, and 2.01

Description: Tests have been made in the Langley 4- by 4-foot supersonic pressure tunnel at Mach numbers of 1.41, 1.61, and 2.01 of various arrangements of a 0.04956-scale model of the Convair F-102A airplane with faired inlets. Tests made of the model equipped with a plain wing, a wing with 6.4 percent conical camber, and a wing with 15 percent conical camber. Body modifications including an extended nose, a modified canopy, and extended afterbody fillets were evaluated. In addition, the effects of a revised vertical tail and two different ventral fins were determined. The results indicated that the use of cambered wings resulted in lower drag in the lift-coefficient range above 0.2. This range, however, is above that which would generally be required for level flight; hence, the usefulness of camber might be confined to increased maneuverability at the higher lifts while its use may be detrimental to the high-speed (low-lift) capabilities.
Date: September 30, 1955
Creator: Spearman, M. Leroy & Driver, Cornelius
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Origin and Distribution of Supersonic Store Interference From Measurement of Individual Forces on Several Wing-fuselage-store Configurations. Ii - Swept-wing Heavy-bomber Configuration With Large Store Nacelle . Lateral Forces and Pitching Moments, Mach Number, 1.61

Description: Effect of large store /nacelle/ on a swept-wing heavy bomber - lateral force and pitching moments.
Date: July 6, 1955
Creator: Carlson, H. W. & Smith, N. F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Origin and Distribution of Supersonic Store Interference From Measurement of Individual Forces on Several Wing-fuselagestore Configurations. 1.-swept-wing Heavy-bomber Configuration With Large Store Nacelle . Lift and Drag, Mach Number, 1.61

Description: Supersonic store interference - 1, swept-wing heavy bomber with large stores - lift & drag at mach 1.61.
Date: March 11, 1955
Creator: Carlson, H. W. & Smith, N. F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Origin and Distribution of Supersonic Store Interference From Measurement of Individual Forces on Several Wing-fuselagestore Configurations. Iii - Swept-wing Fighter-bomber Configuration With Large and Small Stores. Mach Number, 1.61

Description: Origin of supersonic store interference from measurements of individual forces - swept-wing fighter-bomber with large & small stores.
Date: September 15, 1955
Creator: Carlson, H. W. & Smith, N. F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department