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Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Portion of the Horizontal Tail from a Douglas C-74 Airplane with Fabric-Covered Elevators

Description: A Douglas C-74 airplane, during a test dive at about 0.525 Mach number, experienced uncontrollable longitudinal oscillations sufficient to cause shedding of the outer wing panels and the subsequent crash of the airplane. Tests of a section of the horizontal tail plane from a C-74 airplane were conducted in the Ames 16-foot high-speed wind tunnel to investigate the possibility of the tail as a contributing factor to the accident. The results of the investigations of fabric-covered elevators in various conditions of surface deformation are presented in this report.
Date: May 6, 1947
Creator: Perone, Angelo & Berthold, Cecil L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Aerodynamic Characteristics of Four Republic Airfoil Sections from Tests in Langley Two-Dimensional Low-Turbulence Tunnels

Description: Four airfoils sections, designed by the Republic Aviation Corporation for the root and tip sections of the XF-12 airplane, were tested in the Langley two-dimensional low-turbulence tunnels to obtain their aerodynamic characteristics. Lift characteristics were obtained at Reynolds numbers of 3,000,000, 6,000,000, 9,000,000, and 14,000,000, whereas drag characteristics were obtained at Reynolds numbers of 3,000,000, 6,000,000, and 9,000,000. Pressure distributions were obtained for one of the root sections for several angles of attack at a Reynolds number of 2,600,000. Comparison of the root section that appeared best from the tests with the corresponding NACA 65-series section shows the Republic section has a higher maximum lift and higher calculated critical speeds, but a higher minimum drag. In addition, with standard roughness applied to the leading edge, the maximum lift of the Republic airfoil is lower than that of the NACA airfoil. Comparison of the Republic tip section with the corresponding NACA 65-series section shows the Republic airfoil has a lower maximum lift and a higher minimum drag than the NACA airfoil. The calculated critical speeds of the Republic section are slightly higher than those of the NACA section.
Date: September 27, 1945
Creator: Klein, Milton M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Aerodynamic characteristics of horizontal tail surfaces

Description: Collected data are presented on the aerodynamic characteristics of 17 horizontal tail surfaces including several with balanced elevators and two with end plates. Curves are given for coefficients of normal force, drag, and elevator hinge moment. A limited analysis of the results has been made. The normal-force coefficients are in better agreement with the lifting-surface theory of Prandtl and Blenk for airfoils of low aspect ratio than with the usual lifting-line theory. Only partial agreement exists between the elevator hinge-moment coefficients and those predicted by Glauert's thin-airfoil theory.
Date: 1940
Creator: Silverstein, Abe & Katzoff, S
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Aerodynamic Characteristics of Three Deep-Stepped Planing-Tail Flying-Boat Hulls

Description: An investigation was made in the Langley 300 MPH 7- by 10-foot tunnel to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of three deep-stepped planing-tail flying-boat hulls differing only in the amount of step fairing. The hulls were derived by increasing the unfaired step depth of a planing-tail hull of a previous aerodynamic investigation to a depth about 92 percent of the hull beam. Tests were also made on a transverse-stepped hull with an extended afterbody for the purpose of comparison and in order to extend and verify the results of a previous investigation. The investigation indicated that the extended afterbody hull had a minimum drag coefficient about the same as a conventional hull, 0.0066, and an angle-of-attack range for minimum drag coefficient of 0.0057 which was 14 percent less than the transverse stepped hull with extended afterbody; the hulls with step fairing had up to 44 percent less minimum drag coefficient than the transverse-stepped hull, or slightly more drag than a streamlined body having approximately the same length and volume. Longitudinal and lateral instability varied little with step fairing and was about the same as a conventional hull.
Date: March 13, 1947
Creator: Riebe, John M. & Naeseth, Rodger L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department