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Application of the analogy between water flow with a free surface and two-dimensional compressible gas flow

Description: The theory of hydraulic analogy, that is, the analogy between water flow with a free surface and two-dimensional compressible gas flow and the limitations and conditions of the analogy are discussed. A test run was made using the hydraulic analogy as applied to the flow about circular cylinders at various diameters at subsonic velocities extending to the super critical range. The apparatus and techniques used in this application are described and criticized. Reasonably satisfactory agreement of pressure distributions and flow fields existed between water and airflow about corresponding bodies. This agreement indicated the possibility of extending experimental compressibility research by new methods.
Date: February 1, 1947
Creator: Orlin, W James; Lindner, Norman J & Bitterly, Jack G
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Application of the analogy between water flow with a free surface and two-dimensional compressible gas flow

Description: The theory of the hydraulic analogy -- that is, the analogy between water flow with a free surface and two-dimensional compressible gas flow -- and the limitations and conditions of the analogy are discussed. A test was run using the hydraulic analogy as applied to the flow about circular cylinders of various diameters at subsonic velocities extending into the supercritical range. The apparatus and techniques used in this application are described and criticized. Reasonably satisfactory agreement of pressure distributions and flow fields existed between water and air flow about corresponding bodies. This agreement indicated the possibility of extending experimental compressibility research by new methods.
Date: January 1, 1947
Creator: Orlin, W James; Lindner, Norman J & Butterly, Jack G
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Buffeting of External Fuel Tanks at High Speeds on a Gruman F7F-3 Airplane

Description: Attempts were made to alleviate the buffeting of external fuel tanks mounted under the wings of a twin-engine Navy fighter airplane. The Mach number at which buffeting began was increased from 0,529 to 0.640 by streamlining the sway braces and by increasing the lateral rigidity of the sway brace system. Further increase of the Mach number, at which buffeting began to 0.725, was obtained by moving the external fuel tank to a position under the fuselage.
Date: January 29, 1947
Creator: Turner, Howard L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Buffeting of External Fuel Tanks at High Speeds on a Grumman F7F-3 Airplane

Description: Attempts were made to alleviate the buffeting of external fuel tanks mounted under the wings of a twin-engine Navy fighter plane. The Mach number at which the buffeting began was increased from 0.529 to 0.640 by streamlining the sway braces and increasing the lateral rigidity of the sway brace system. Further increases of the Mach number, at which buffeting began to 0.725, was obtained by moving the external fuel tank to a position under the fuselage.
Date: January 30, 1947
Creator: Turner, Howard L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calculation of compressible flows past aerodynamic shapes by use of the streamline curvature

Description: A simple approximate method is given for the calculation of isentropic irrotational flows past symmetrical airfoils, including mixed subsonic-supersonic flows. The method is based on the choice of suitable values for the streamline curvature in the flow field and the subsequent integration of the equations of motion. The method yields limiting solutions for potential flow. The effect of circulation is considered. A comparison of derived velocity distributions with existing results that are based on calculation to the third order in the thickness ratio indicated satisfactory agreement. The results are also presented in the form of a set of compressibility correction rules that lie between the Prandtl-Glauert rule and the von Karman-Tsien rule (approximately). The different rules correspond to different values of the local shape parameter square root sign YC sub a, in which Y is the ordinate and C sub a is the curvature at a point on an airfoil. Bodies of revolution, completely supersonic flows, and the significance of the limiting solutions for potential flow are also briefly discussed.
Date: June 1, 1947
Creator: Perl, W
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Calculation of the Heat Required for Wing Thermal Ice Prevention in Specified Icing Conditions

Description: Flight tests were made in natural icing conditions with two 8-ft-chord heated airfoils of different sections. Measurements of meteorological variables conducive to ice formation were made simultaneously with the procurement of airfoil thermal data. The extent of knowledge on the meteorology of icing, the impingement of water drops on airfoil surfaces, and the processes of heat transfer and evaporation from a wetted airfoil surface have been increased to a point where the design of heated wings on a fundamental, wet-air basis now can be undertaken with reasonable certainty.
Date: December 1, 1947
Creator: Bergrun, Norman R.; Jukoff, David; Schlaff, Bernard A. & Neel, Carr B., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calculation of the Pressure Distribution on Bodies of Revolution in the Subsonic Flow of a Gas, Part 1, Axially Symmetrical Flow

Description: The present report concerns a method of computing the velocity and pressure distributions on bodies of revolution in axially symmetrical flow in the subsonic range. The differential equation for the velocity potential Phi of a compressible fluid motion is linearized tn the conventional manner, and then put in the form Delta(Phi) = 0 by affine transformation. The quantity Phi represents the velocity potential of a fictitious incompressible flow, for which a constant superposition of sources by sections is secured by a method patterned after von Karman which must comply with the boundary condition delta(phi)/delta(n) = 0 at the originally specified contour. This requirement yields for the "pseudo-stream function" psi a differential equation which must be fulfilled for as many points on the contour as source lengths are assumed. In this manner, the problem of defining the still unknown source intensities is reduced to the solution of an inhomogeneous equation system. The pressure distribution is then determined with the aid of Bernoulli's equation and adiabatic equation of state. Lastly, the pressure distributions in compressible and incompressible medium are compared on a model problem.
Date: July 1, 1947
Creator: Bilharz, Herbert & Hoelder, Ernst
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calculation of Wing Bending Moments and Tail Loads Resulting from the Jettison of Wing Tips During a Symmetrical Pull-Up

Description: A preliminary analytical investigation was made to determine the feasibility of the basic idea of controlled failure points as safety valves for the primary airplane structure. The present analysis considers the possibilities of the breakable wing tip which, in failing as a weak link, would relieve the bending moments on the wing structure. The analysis was carried out by computing the time histories of the wing and stabilizer angle of attack in a 10g pull-up for an XF8F airplane with tips fixed and comparing the results with those for the same maneuver, that is, elevator motion but with tips jettisoned at 8g. The calculations indicate that the increased stability accompanying the loss of the wing tips reduces the bending moment an additional amount above that which would be expected from the initial loss in lift and the inboard shift in load. The vortex shed when the tips are lost may induce a transient load requiring that the tail be made stronger than otherwise.
Date: December 11, 1947
Creator: Boshar, John
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calculations and Experimental Investigations on the Feed-Power Requirement of Airplanes with Boundary-Layer Control

Description: Calculations and test results are given about the feed-power requirement of airplanes with boundary-layer control. Curves and formulas for the rough estimate of pressure-loss and feed-power requirement are set up for the investigated arrangements which differ structurally and aerodynamically. According to these results the feed power for three different designs is calculated at the end of the report.
Date: September 1, 1947
Creator: Krueger, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calculations of the Supersonic Wave Drag of Nonlifting Wings with Arbitrary Sweepback and Aspect Ratio: Wings Swept Behind the Mach Lines

Description: On the basis of a recently developed theory for finite sweptback wings at supersonic speeds, calculations of the supersonic wave drag at zero lift were made for a series of wings having thin symmetrical biconvex sections with untapered plan forms and various angles of sweepback and aspect ratios. The results are presented in a unified form so that a single chart permits the direct determination of the wave drag for this family of airfoils for an extensive range of aspect ratio and sweepback angle for stream Mach numbers up to a value corresponding to that at which the Mach line coincides with the wing leading edge. The calculations showed that in general the wave-drag coefficient decreased with increasing sweepback. At Mach numbers for which the Mach lines are appreciably ahead of the wing leading edge, the 'wave-drag coefficient decreased to an important extent with increases in aspect ratio or slenderness ratio. At Mach numbers for which the Mach lines approach the wing leading edge (Mach numbers approaching a value equal to the secant of the angle of sweepback), the wave-drag coefficient decreased with reductions in aspect ratio or slenderness ratio. In order to check the results obtained by the theory, a comparison was made with the results of tests at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory of sweptback wing attached to a freely falling body. The variation of the drag with Mach number and aspect ratio as given by the theory appeared to be in reasonable.
Date: February 21, 1947
Creator: Harmon, Sidney M & Swanson, Margaret D
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calibration and Measurement in Turbulence Research by the Hot-Wire Method

Description: The problem of turbulence in aerodynamics is at present being attacked both theoretically and experimentally. In view of the fact however that purely theoretical considerations have not thus far led to satisfactory results the experimental treatment of the problem is of great importance. Among the different measuring procedures the hot wire methods are so far recognized as the most suitable for investigating the turbulence structure. The several disadvantages of these methods however, in particular those arising from the temperature lag of the wire can greatly impair the measurements and may easily render questionable the entire value of the experiment. The name turbulence is applied to that flow condition in which at any point of the stream the magnitude and direction of the velocity fluctuate arbitrarily about a well definable mean value. This fluctuation imparts a certain whirling characteristic to the flow.
Date: June 1, 1947
Creator: Kovasznay, Kaszlo
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department