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Aluminum and its light alloys

Description: Report is a summary of research work which has been done here and abroad on the constitution and mechanical properties of the various alloy systems with aluminum. The mechanical properties and compositions of commercial light alloys for casting, forging, or rolling, obtainable in this country are described.
Date: 1920?~
Creator: Merica, Paul D
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis of stresses in German airplanes

Description: This report contains an account of the origin of the views and fundamental principles underlying the construction of German airplanes during the war. The report contains a detailed discussion of the aerodynamic principles and their use in determining the strength of airplanes, the analysis of the strength qualities of materials and in the construction, the calculated strength of air flows and a description of tests made in determining the strength of airplanes.
Date: 1922
Creator: Hoff, Wilhelm
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A comparison of the take-off and landing characteristics of a number of service airplane

Description: This investigation, which is a continuation of Technical Report 154, follows very closely the earlier methods and covers a number of service airplanes, whereas the previous report covered but one, the JN-4H. In addition to the air speed, acceleration, and control positions as given in report no. 154, information is here given regarding the distance run and the ground speed for the various airplanes during the two maneuvers.
Date: January 1, 1927
Creator: Carroll, Thomas
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Determination of turning characteristics of an airship by means of a camera obscura

Description: This investigation was carried out by the National Advisory Committee at Langley Field for the purpose of determining the adaptability of the camera obscura to the securing of turning characteristics of airships, and also of obtaining some of those characteristics of the C-7 airship. The method consisted in flying the airship in circling flight over a camera obscura and photographing it at known time intervals. The results show that the method used is highly satisfactory and that for the particular maneuver employed the turning diameter is 1,240 feet, corresponding to a turning coefficient of 6.4, and that the position of zero angle of yaw is at the nose of the airship.
Date: January 1, 1925
Creator: Crowley, J W , Jr & Freeman, R G
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A study of static stability of airships

Description: The first section deals with the theoretical side of statical stability of airships in general. The second section deals with preliminary tests of the model and experiments for the determination of effects due to change of tail area, aspect ratio, tail form, and tail thickness.
Date: September 1, 1924
Creator: Rizzo, Frank
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The elimination of dead center in the controls of airplanes with thick sections

Description: In several instances where control flaps are placed in the trailing edges of thick sections, it has appeared that a dead center (slackness or lack of control) exists about the neutral position. The condition was also experienced in the rudder action of the XB1A observation airplane. Examination of smoke pictures of the airflow around struts and airfoils indicates what may be the cause of the phenomenon. The streamwise airflow about the thick fin does not follow the surface of the rudder, and consequently the rudder can be moved between the boundaries of the intervening turbulent zone without developing an aerodynamic force. In order to alleviate this condition, a modification was designed and built for the XB1A. The modified rudder was intended to remedy the condition by thickening the section sufficiently to fill in the zone of turbulent flow and thus eliminate the dead center. The positive results of flight tests are given.
Date: November 1, 1922
Creator: Carroll, Thomas
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mass distribution and performance of free flight models

Description: This note deals with the mass distribution and performance of free flight models. An airplane model which is to be used in free flight tests must be balanced dynamically as well as statically, e.g., it must not only have a given weight and the proper center of gravity but also a given ellipsoid of inertia. Equations which relate the motions of an airplane and its model are given. Neglecting scale effect, these equations may be used to predict the performance of an airplane, under the action of gravity alone, from data obtained in making dropping tests of a correctly balanced model.
Date: October 1, 1927
Creator: Scherberg, Max & Rhode, R V
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An impulse electric motor for driving recording instruments

Description: The chief purpose in undertaking the development of this synchronous motor was the creation of a very small, compact power source, capable of driving the film drums of the recording aircraft instruments designed by the staff of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics.
Date: September 1, 1923
Creator: Joachim, W F
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Increasing the compression pressure in an engine by using a long intake pipe

Description: During some tests of a one-cylinder engine, using gas oil (diesel engine oil, specific gravity 0.86 at 60 F) with solid injection and compression ignition, it was found to be necessary to increase either the jacket water temperature or the compression pressure in order to start the engine. It was found that a sufficient increase in compression pressure could be obtained simply by attaching a long pipe to the inlet flange of the cylinder. However, since no data were available giving the values of the increase in compression pressure that might be expected from such a step-up, an investigation was made covering some engine speeds between 500 r.p.m. and 1800 r.p.m. The data obtained are included here in the form of curves. Although this data is not strictly applicable to another engine, it should give indications of what might be expected with such a set-up on an engine operating at similar speeds. The engine used was a single cylinder Liberty, 5-inch bore and 7-inch stroke, having standard cylinder, cams, valves, and valve timing and operating on a four-stroke cycle.
Date: February 1, 1924
Creator: Mathews, Robertson & Gardiner, Arthur W
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preliminary biplane tests in the variable density wind tunnel

Description: Biplane cellules using the N.A.C.A.-M6 airfoil section have been tested in the variable density wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. Three cellules, differing only in the amount of stagger, were tested at two air densities, corresponding to pressures of one atmosphere and of twenty atmospheres. The range of angle of attack was from -2 degrees to +48 degrees. The effect of stagger on the lift and drag, and on the shielding effect of the upper wing by the lower at high angles of attack was determined.
Date: June 1, 1928
Creator: Shoemaker, James M
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The time lag and interval of discharge with a spring actuated fuel injection pump

Description: Discussed here is research on a spring activated fuel pump for solid or airless injection with small, high speed internal combustion engines. The pump characteristics under investigation were the interval of fuel injection in terms of degrees of crank travel and in absolute time, the lag between the time the injection pump plunger begins its stroke and the appearance of the jet at the orifice, and the manner in which the fuel spray builds up to a maximum when the fuel valve is opened, and then diminishes.
Date: September 1, 1923
Creator: Matthews, Robertson & Gardiner, A W
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pressure distribution on the nose of an airship in circling flight

Description: In recent tests on the pressures occurring on the envelope and control surfaces of the naval airship C-7, it was noted that the pressures on the nose of the airship, while flying in level circling flight, were symmetrically distributed. Such a condition can only occur when the nose of the airship is pointed directly into the wind, and to accomplish this in circling flight, the axis of the airship must then be parallel to the direction of the motion of the nose. The question was raised as to whether the same conditions occur generally on all airships in circling flight. It appears that airships flying in a constant, level, circling flight path will generally head very closely into the wind, and any deviation will be so slight that the distribution of pressure over the nose will be but slightly, if at all, changed from a symmetrical distribution.
Date: August 1, 1925
Creator: Fairbanks, Karl J
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pressure distribution on wing ribs of the VE-7 and TS airplanes in flight

Description: This paper is the first of a series of notes, each of which presents the complete results of pressure distribution tests made by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, on single-wing ribs of the VE-7 and TS airplanes for a particular condition of flight. The level flight results are presented here in the form of curves and show the comparison between the pressure distribution over a representative thin wing, R.A.F.-15, and a moderately thick wing, U.S.A.-27, throughout the range of angle of attack.
Date: October 1, 1927
Creator: Rhode, R V
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Spiral tendency in blind flying

Description: The flight path followed by an airplane which was being flown by a blindfolded pilot was observed and recorded. When the pilot attempted to make a straight-away flight there was a tendency to deviate from the straight path and to take up a spiral one.
Date: August 1, 1929
Creator: Carroll, Thomas & Mcavoy, William H
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comparing maximum pressures in internal combustion engines

Description: Thin metal diaphragms form a satisfactory means for comparing maximum pressures in internal combustion engines. The diaphragm is clamped between two metal washers in a spark plug shell and its thickness is chosen such that, when subjected to explosion pressure, the exposed portion will be sheared from the rim in a short time.
Date: June 1, 1922
Creator: Sparrow, Stanwood W & Lee, Stephen M
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The drift of an aircraft guided towards it's destination by directional receiving of radio signals transmitted from the ground

Description: Following a curved path increases the distance to be flown, and a type of radio navigation that forces the adoption of such a path is therefore less efficient than one that marks out a definite straight line between the point of departure and the intended destination, and holds the airplane to that line. To determine the loss of efficiency resulting from curvature of the path, calculations were made for two particular cases by the method of step-by-step integration. The calculations were based on the assumption that the pilot makes straightforward use of his radio for navigation and makes no allowance for drift. Results are given in tabular form for two airplanes flying 200 miles at 100 mph, one with a cross wind of 50 mph wind across course, and the other with a 20 mph wind across course. It is shown that the following of the curved path increases the time of flight and the air distance flown by 17 percent and 2.5 percent in the two cases.
Date: June 1, 1925
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Experience with geared propeller drives for aviation engines

Description: I. The development of the gear wheels: (a) bending stresses; (b) compressive stresses; (c) heating; (d) precision of manufacture. II. General arrangement of the gearing. III. Vibration in the shaft transmission. An overview is given of experience with geared propeller drives for aviation engines. The development of gear wheels is discussed with emphasis upon bending stresses, compressive stresses, heating, and precision in manufacturing. With respect to the general arrangement of gear drives for airplanes, some principal rules of mechanical engineering that apply with special force are noted. The primary vibrations in the shaft transmission are discussed. With respect to vibration, various methods for computing vibration frequency and the influence of elastic couplings are discussed.
Date: September 1, 1920
Creator: Kutzbach, K
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tests of the Daimler D-IVa engine at a high altitude test bench

Description: Reports of tests of a Daimler IVa engine at the test-bench at Friedrichshafen, show that the decrease of power of that engine, at high altitudes, was established, and that the manner of its working when air is supplied at a certain pressure was explained. These tests were preparatory to the installation of compressors in giant aircraft for the purpose of maintaining constant power at high altitudes.
Date: October 1, 1920
Creator: Noack, W G
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Italian and French experiments on wind tunnels

Description: Given here are the results of experiments conducted by Colonel Costanzi of the Italian Army to determine the influence of the surrounding building in which a wind tunnel was installed on the efficiency of the installation, and how the efficiency of the installation was affected by the design of the tunnel. Also given are the results of a series of experiments by Eiffel on 34 models of tunnels of different dimensions. This series of experiments was started in order to find out if, by changing the shape of the nozzle or of the diffuser of the large tunnel at Auteuil, the efficiency of the installation could be improved.
Date: November 1, 1920
Creator: Knight, WM
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The dynamometer hub for the testing propellers and engines during flight

Description: The need for a device to measure flight resistance, engine and propeller power, and efficiency during flight grew in proportion to the demand for increased flying capacity in military types of aircraft. Here, a dynamometer hub was inserted between the engine and the propeller. Taken as a whole, the tests that were conducted show that though the dynamometer is a sensitive instrument liable to numerous derangements, it is undeniably useful even in its present form, when handled with care and skill. Facilitating, as it does, the possibility of maintaining the fixed position of the engine, the blocking out of the weight effect when the plane is in the sloping position, and the possibility of taking direct measurements of force at the point of transmission, the dynamometer appears to be by far the best solution of the problem of a flying test bench, utilized as a hydraulic balance with the smallest possible measuring stroke and the least tendency to oscillation.
Date: July 1, 1921
Creator: Enoch, O
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Experiments with a built-in or fuselage radiator

Description: The experiments discussed here were performed to determine whether radiators having similar cooling properties offer less resistance when incorporated into the fuselage, than when the hitherto customary arrangement is employed, with the radiator in the free air current more or less independent of the fuselage. The experiments indicated that the quantity of air flowing through the radiator is greatest when the fuselage and the radiator are separate. However, separate radiators cause more air resistance. When the radiator is incorporated into the fuselage, it is only possible to obtain a quantity equal to that which flows through the radiator in the free air current if the lateral outlet vents are widened or the quantity of air in increased by some special means, such as fans. Whether it is possible, in practice, to obtain the necessary cooling effect in this way, together with reduced resistance of the fuselage, is not decided here, since it is a question of construction.
Date: May 1, 1923
Creator: Wiesselsberger, C
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department