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Tables and Charts of Flow Parameters Across Oblique Shocks

Description: Shock-wave equations have been evaluated for a range of Mach number in front of the shock from 1.05 to 4.0. Mach number behind the shock, pressure ratio, derivation of flow, and angle of shock are presented on charts. Values are also included for density ratio and change in entropy.
Date: August 1948
Creator: Neice, Mary M.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Considerations of the Total Drag of Supersonic Airfoil Sections

Description: The results of calculations of the viscous and pressure drags of some two-dimensional supersonic airfoils at zero lift are presented. The results indicate that inclusion of viscous drag alters many previous results regarding the desirability of certain airfoil shapes for securing low drags at supersonic speeds. At certain Reynolds and Mach numbers, for instance, a circular-arc airfoil may theoretically have less drag than the previously advocated symmetrical wedge-shape profile; although under different conditions, the circular-arc airfoil may have a higher drag.
Date: July 1947
Creator: Ivey, H. Reese & Klunker, E. Bernard
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

NACA: University Conference on Aerodynamics, A Compilation of the Papers Presented

Description: This document contains reproductions of the technical papers presented at the NACA - University Conference on Aerodynamics held at the Langley Aeronautical Laboratory on June 21, 22, and 23, 1948. The conference was held in recognition of the difficulties, imposed by security restrictions, in keeping abreast of the rapid advances in aerodynamics. The papers were prepared to review the status of a number of fields of interest, to summarize the more important wartime advances that are no longer classified, and to orient reference material for further study. The papers in this document are in the same form in which they were presented at the conference so that distribution of them might be prompt. The original presentation and this record are considered as complementary to, rather than as substitutes for, the Committee?s system of complete and formal reports.
Date: January 1, 1948
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wind-Tunnel Development of Ailerons for the Curtiss XP-60 Airplanem Special Report

Description: An investigation was made in the LWAL 7- by 10-foot tunnel of internally balanced, sealed ailerons for the Curtiss XP-60 airplane. Ailerons with tabs and. with various amounts of balance were tested. Stick forces were estimated for several aileron arrangements including an arrangement recommended for the airplane. Flight tests of the recommended arrangement are discussed briefly in an appendix, The results of the wind-tunnel and flight tests indicate that the ailerons of large or fast airplanes may be satisfactorily balanced by the method developed.
Date: September 1, 1942
Creator: Rogallo, F. M. & Lowry, John G.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tests of an NACA 66,2-420 Airfoil of 5-Foot Chord at High Speed, Special Report

Description: This report covers tests of a 5-foot model of the NACA 66,2-420 low-drag airfoil at high speeds including the critical compressibility speed. Section coefficients of lift, drag, and pitching moment, and extensive pressure-distribution data are presented. The section drag coefficient at the design lift coefficient of 0.4 increased from 0.0042 at low speeds to 0.0052 at a Mach number of 0.56 (390 mph at 25,000 ft altitude). The critical Mach number was about 0.60. The results cover a Reynold number range from 4 millions to 17 millions.
Date: September 1, 1942
Creator: Hood, Manley J. & Anderson, Joseph L.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tests of Wing Machine-Gun and Cannon Installations in the NACA Full-Scale Wind Tunnel, Special Report

Description: At the request of the Bureau of Aeronautics, an investigation was conducted in the full-scale wind tunnel of wing installations of .50-caliber machine guns and 20-millimeter cannons. The tests were made to determine the effect of various gun installations on the maximum lift and the high-speed drag of the airplane.
Date: August 1, 1941
Creator: Czarnecki, K. R. & Guryansky, Eugene R.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tests of a Highly Cambered Low-Drag-Airfoil Section with a Lift-Control Flap, Special Report

Description: Tests were made in the NACA two-dimensional low turbulence pressure tunnel of a highly cambered low-drag airfoil (NACA 65,3-618) with a plain flap designed for lift control. The results indicate that such a combination offers attractive possibilities for obtaining low profile-drag coefficients over a wide range of lift coefficients without large reductions of critical speed.
Date: December 1, 1942
Creator: Abbott, Ira H. & Miller, Ralph B.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Study of Turning Performance of a Fighter-Type Airplane Particularly as Affected by Flaps and Increased Supercharging, Special Report

Description: Results of a study to determine the effects on turning performance due to various assumed modifications to a typical Naval fighter airplane are presented. The modifications considered included flaps of various types, both part and full space, increased supercharging, and increased wing loading. The calculations indicated that near the low-speed end of the speed range, the turning performance, as defined by steady level turns at a given speed, would be improved to some extent by any of the flaps considered at altitudes up to about 25,000 feet. (If turning is not restricted to the conditions of no loss of speed or altitude, more rapid turning can, of course, be accomplished with the aid of flaps, regardless of altitude.) Fowler flaps and NACA slotted flaps appeared somewhat superior to split or perforated split flaps for maneuvering purposes, particularly if the flap position is not adjustable. Similarly, better turning performance should be realized with full-span than with part-span flaps. Turning performance over the lower half of the speed range would probably not be materially improved at any altitude by increased supercharging of the engine unless the propeller were redesigned to absorb the added power more effectively; with a suitable propeller the turning performance at high altitudes could probably be greatly improved with increased supercharging. A reduction in wing area with the aspect ratio held constant would result in impairment of turning performance over practically the entire speed range at all altitudes.
Date: June 1, 1942
Creator: Wetmore, J. W.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Propeller-Design Problems of High-Speed Airplanes, Special Report

Description: It is shown that on the basis of existing high-speed airfoil data, propeller efficiencies appreciably in excess of 40% do not appear possible at speeds above 500 miles per hour at 20,000 feet. The assumption that present propeller-blade thicknesses cannot be reduced radically, is implied. Until the reliability and applicability of the airfoil data are established, this conclusion must not be regarded as infallible. Dive tests with airplanes equipped with thrust meters and torque meters are proposed to provide an urgently needed check. The design of high-speed propellers is dictated wholly by compressibility considerations. The blade width, thickness, and pitch distribution; also the airfoil sections, the lift coefficient, the propeller diameter, and rpm must all be adjusted if reasonable efficiencies are to be maintained at airplane speeds that are now being approached. Research is urgently needed on: 1) airfoils at subsonic, sonic, and supersonic speeds; 2) propellers at high forward speeds in wind tunnels; 3)propellers in free flight at high speeds; and 4) jet propulsion and related devices. The breakdown of propeller efficiency indicated by airfoil data, should serve as an incentive for accelerated research on jet propulsion. This device may extend the attainable speed of current airplanes to the neighborhood of 550 miles per hour at 20,000 feet.
Date: April 1, 1941
Creator: Dickinson, H. B.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Radiator Design and Installation - II, Special Report

Description: A mathematical analysis of radiator design has been made. The volume of the radiator using least total power has been expressed in a single formula which shows that the optimum radiator volume is independent of the shape of the radiator and which makes possible the construction of design tables that give the optimum radiator volume per 100-horsepower heat dissipation as a function of the speed, of the altitude, and of one parameter involving characteristics of the airplane. Although, for a given set of conditions, the radiator volume using the least total power is fixed, the frontal area, or the length of the radiator needs to be separately specified in order to satisfy certain other requirement such as the ability to cool with the pressure drop available while the airplane is climbing. In order to simplify the specification for the shape of the radiator and in order to reduce the labor involved in calculating the detailed performance of radiators, generalized design curves have been developed for determining the pressure drop, the mass flow of air, and the power expended in overcoming the cooling drag of a radiator from the physical dimensions of the radiator. In addition, a table is derived from these curves, which directly gives the square root of the pressure drop required for ground cooling as a function of the radiator dimensions, of the heat dissipation and of the available temperature difference. Typical calculations using the tables of optimum radiator volume and the design curves are given. The jet power that can be derived from the heated air is proportional to the heat dissipation and is approximately proportional to the square of the airplane speed and to the reciprocal of the absolute temperature of the atmosphere. A table of jet power, per 100 horsepower of heat dissipation at various ...
Date: January 1, 1942
Creator: Tifford, Arthur N.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Remote Indicating Hinge-Moment Balance, Special Report

Description: This report describes an electrical hinge-moment balance for use with wind-tunnel models of aircraft. A brief description of the principle of operation and operating experience with the balance is given in part I. Part II gives constructional details and part III gives theoretical considerations. Extensive constructional information is given to enable the reproduction of the equipment.
Date: August 1, 1941
Creator: Stoller, Morton J. & Ribner, Herbert S.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Restraint Provided a Flat Rectangular Plate by a Sturdy Stiffener Along an Edge of the Plate, Special Report

Description: A sturdy stiffener is defined as a stiffener of such proportions that it does not suffer cross-sectional distortion when moments are applied to some part of the cross section. When such a stiffener is attached to one edge of a plate, it will resist rotation of that edge of the plate by means of its torsional properties. A formula is given for the restraint coefficient provided the plate by such a stiffener. This coefficient is required for the calculation of the critical compressive stress of the plate.
Date: May 1, 1941
Creator: Lundquist, Eugene E. & Stowell, Elbridge Z.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department