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Summary of 65-Series Compressor-Blade Low-Speed Cascade Data by Use of the Carpet-Plotting Technique
Carpet plots included permit the selection of the blade camber and the design angle of attack required to fulfill a design vector diagram. Other carpet plots provide means for the prediction of off-design turning angles.
Some Recent Contributions to the Study of Transition and Turbulent Boundary Layers
No Description Available.
Considerations of the Total Drag of Supersonic Airfoil Sections
The results of calculations of the viscous and pressure drags of some two-dimensional supersonic airfoils at zero lift are presented. The results indicate that inclusion of viscous drag alters many previous results regarding the desirability of certain airfoil shapes for securing low drags at supersonic speeds. At certain Reynolds and Mach numbers, for instance, a circular-arc airfoil may theoretically have less drag than the previously advocated symmetrical wedge-shape profile; although under different conditions, the circular-arc airfoil may have a higher drag.
Analysis of the High-Altitude Cooling of the Ranger SGV-770 D-4 Engine in the Bell XP-77 Airplane
No abstract available.
Annual Report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (42nd), Administrative Report without Technical Reports
No abstract available.
Annual Report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (1st). [Administrative Report Including Technical Reports Nos. 1 to 7]
Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, expenditures, problems, recommendations, and a compilation of technical reports produced.
Thirty-Seventh Annual Report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics: Administrative Report Including Technical Report Nos. 1003 to 1058
In accordance with the act of Congress, approved March 3,1915 (U.S. C. title 50, sec. 151), which established the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics the Committee submits its thirty-seventh annual report for the fiscal year 1951. The United States is engaged in expanding military aviation to levels never before reached except in the midst of a major war. In Korea, our military aircraft are engaged in combat with airplanes of an unfriendly nation evidently able to build military aircraft of increasing capabilities. In this environment, the NACA is responsible for conducting an adequate program of scientific research to open the way for the design of aircraft and missile of superior performance. Since World War II the pace of technical development has increased. Until then, improvement in aircraft performance as a result of the application of scientific research proceeded at what. now seems to be a relatively slow and orderly rate. Modest increases in speed, climb, range, or altitude were set as reasonable goals. Compressibility effects at high speeds were just beginning to be encountered and indicated a formidable barrier near the velocity of sound. This barrier has been found by research and experiment to be lees formidable than supposed, and we now see the possibility of radical gains in airplane performance that are of great military significance. Such gains are ak attainable by a potential enemy. The increased complexity of modern high performance.
Tables for the Computation of Wave Drag of Arrow Wings of Arbitrary Airfoil Section
Tables and computing instructions for the rapid evaluation of the wave drag of delta wings and of arrow wings having a ration of the tangent of the trailing-edge sweep angle to the tangent of the leading-edge sweep angle in the range from -1.0 to 0.8. The tables cover a range of both subsonic and supersonic leading edges.
Two-Dimensional Irrotational Transonic Flows of a Compressible Fluid
The methods of NACA TN No. 995 have been slightly modified and extended in include flows with circulation by considering the alteration of the singularities of the incompressible solution due to the presence of the hypergeometric functions in the analytic continuation of the solution. It was found that for finite Mach numbers the only case in which the nature of the singularity can remain unchanged is for a ratio of specific heats equal to -1. From a study of two particular flows it seems that the effect of geometry cannot be neglected, and the conventional "pressure-correction" formulas are not valid, even in the subsonic region if the body is thick, especially if there is a supersonic region in the flow.
Charts for the Computation of Equilibrium Composition of Chemical Reactions in the Carbon-Hydrogen-Nitrogen System at Temperatures from 2000 to 5000 Degrees K
Charts are provided for the estimation and progressive adjustment of two independent variables on which the calculations are based. Additional charts are provided for the graphical calculation of the composition.
NACA Conference on Aircraft Structures
This document contains reproductions of technical papers on some of the most recent research results on aircraft structures from the NACA Laboratories. These papers were presented by members of the staff of the NACA Laboratories at the NACA conference held at the Langley Aeronautical Laboratory March 7, 1951. The purpose of this conference was to convey to those involved in the study of aircraft structures these recent research results and to provide those attending an opportunity for discussion of these results. The papers in this document are in the same form in which they were presented at the conference so that distribution of them might be prompt. The original presentation and this record are considered as complimentary to, rather than as substitute for, the Committee?s system of complete and formal reports.
Detail Calculations of the Estimated Shift in Stick-Fixed Neutral Point Due to the Windmilling Propeller and to the Fuselage of the Republic XF-12 Airplane
Detail calculations are presented of the shifts in stick-fixed neutral point of the Republic XF-12 airplane due to the windmilling propellers and to the fuselage. The results of these calculations differ somewhat from those previously made for this airplane by Republic Aviation Corporation personnel under the direction of Langley flight division personnel. Due to these differences the neutral point for the airplane is predicted to be 37.8 percent mean aerodynamic chord, instead of 40.8 percent mean aerodynamic chord as previously reported.
Aerodynamic Investigation of a Cup Anemometer
Results of an investigation wherein the change of the normal force coefficient with Reynolds Number was obtained statically for a 15.5-centimeter hemispherical cup.
Average Outside-Surface Heat-Transfer Coefficients and Velocity Distributions for Heated and Cooled Impulse Turbine Blades in Static Cascades
Heat-transfer investigation conducted on cooled as well heated impulse-type turbine blades in a static cascade to determine the effect of direction of heat flow on convective heat-transfer coefficients.
Bending Tests of Metal Monocoque Fuselage Construction
Study of the bending stress in smooth skin, aluminum alloy, true monocoque fuselage sections of varying ratio of diameter to thickness.
The 7 by 10 foot wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics
This report presents a description of the 7 by 10 foot wind tunnel and associated apparatus of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. Included also are calibration test results and characteristic test data of both static force tests and autorotation tests made in the tunnel.
A Comparison of Theory and Experiment for High-Speed Free-Molecule Flow
Comparison of free-molecule-flow theory with the results of wind-tunnel tests performed to determine the drag and temperature-rise characteristics of a transverse circular cylinder.
Addition of heat to a compressible fluid in motion
From Introduction: "The purpose of this report is to summarize, without extended proofs, the results of a study of a simplified model of nonadiabiatic, compressible fluid flow, both subsonic and supersonic, and to state these results in a form that will make them immediately useful in providing a theoretical background for current technical problems of high-speed combustion.
Acoustic analysis of ram-jet buzz
From Introduction: "The surging of a system containing a centrifugal- or axial-flow compressor (e.g., refs. 1 to 4) is an example of self-sustained oscillation. Inlets designed for supersonic jet engines also have been observed to induce oscillations (e.g., refs. 5 to 11) which are usually referred to as "buzz." The origin of buzz in ram-jet engines is the subject of the present report."
An 8-foot axisymmetrical fixed nozzle for subsonic Mach numbers up to 0.99 and for a supersonic Mach number of 1.2
From Introduction: "This paper, which should be of interest to those concerned with transonic wind tunnels, covers the design and operating characteristics of the nozzle."
Adaptation of aeronautical engines to high altitude flying
Report discussing Issues and techniques relative to the adaptation of aircraft engines to high altitude flight. Covered here are the limits of engine output, modifications and characteristics of high altitude engines, the influence of air density on the proportions of fuel mixtures, methods of varying the proportions of fuel mixtures, the automatic prevention of fuel waste, and the design and application of air pressure regulators to high altitude flying. Summary: 1. Limits of engine output. 2. High altitude engines. 3. Influence of air density on proportions of mixture. 4. Methods of varying proportions of mixture. 5. Automatic prevention of fuel waste. 6. Design and application of air pressure regulators to high altitude flying.
The Aachen wind-tunnel balance
Report discussing a description of the balance in the Aachen wind-tunnel.
Acoustic, thrust, and drag characteristics of several full-scale noise suppressors for turbojet engines
From Introduction: " Considerable analytical and experimental research has been done to find means of reducing the noise levels of the turbojet transports. Noise levels can be decreased by engine redesign to reduce the jet-exit velocity (ref. 1), proper flight-climb techniques (ref. 2), and the use of noise-suppression exhaust nozzles (refs. 3 to 5). The present report is concerned with the last method."
Acoustical treatment for the NACA 8- by 6-foot supersonic propulsion wind tunnel
From Introduction: "This report presents results of a research and engineering program performed during the first half of 1950 that resulted in an acoustical treatment for the 8- by 6-foot supersonic wind tunnel at the Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory."
Acoustics of a nonhomogeneous moving medium.
Report discussing theoretical basis of the acoustics of a moving nonhomogeneous medium. Experiments that illustrate or confirm some of the theoretical explanation or derivation of these acoustics are also included.
Acoustic radiation from two-dimensional rectangular cutouts in aerodynamic surfaces
From Introduction: "The experiments in high-speed flow showed that an intense, high-frequency acoustic radiation is an essential feature of the problem. Consequently, a study of the acoustic field (involving schlieren observations and frequency and intensity measurements) was undertaken. This report presents the salient features of the study, which was mainly exploratory."
Activation of hydrocarbons and the octane number
This report presents an examination of the history of research on engine knocking and the various types of fuels used in the investigations of this phenomenon. According to this report, the spontaneous ignition of hydrocarbons doped with oxygen follows the logarithmic law within a certain temperature range, but not above 920 degrees K. Having extended the scope of investigations to prove hydrocarbons, the curves of the mixtures burned by air should then be established by progressive replacement of pure iso-octane with heptane. Pentane was also examined in this report.
Adaptor for measuring principal strains with Tuckerman strain gage
Report discussing an adapter which uses three Tuckerman optical strain gages to measure the displacement of the three vortices of an equilateral triangle along lines 120 degrees apart. These displacements are substituted in well-known equations in order to compute the magnitude and direction of the principal strains. Tests of the adaptor indicate that principal strains over a gage length of 1.42 inch may be measured with a systematic error not exceeding 4 percent and a mean observational error of the order of + or minus 0.000006. The maximum observed error in strain was of the order of 0.00006. The directions of principal strains for unidirectional stress were measured with the adaptor with an average error of the order of 1 degree.
The 1934 contest for the Deutsch de la Meurthe trophy
This report presents a description of the rules, history and new technical innovations in the Deutsch de la Meurthe Cup race of 1934.
The 1933 contest for the Deutsch de la Meurthe trophy
Report discussing the regulations and airplanes participating in the 1933 contest competing for the Deutsch de la Meurthe trophy.
The 1350 F stress-rupture properties of two wrought alloys and three cast alloys
From Summary: "These properties compare favorably with those of the strongest similar alloys previously investigated. However, compared with a 60Cr-25Fe-15Mo alloy, the three cobalt-chronium-nickel cast alloys are inferior. A correlation of NACA and OSRD (Project NRC-8) data is presented, showing the variation of rupture strengths with temperature in the range of 1350^o to 2000^o for alloys."
The 1926 German seaplane contest
The report discusses the problem of rating the various seaplane designs from the 1926 seaplane contest. The whole process of rating consists in measuring the climbing speed, flying weight and carrying capacity of a seaplane and then using these data as the basis of a construction problem.
The 1929 Rhon soaring-flight contest
The limitation of the 1929 contest to performance gliders necessitated the establishment of a formula which would make it possible to distinguish between performance gliders and school and training gliders. The sinking speed was therefore adopted as the basis for such a distinction, and the requirement was made that the sinking speed of a performance glider should not exceed 0.8 m/s. The rest of the report details the different entries with regard to design and performance.
N.A.C.A. control position recorder
Report discussing a new instrument is described which is capable of simultaneously recording the position of the three controls of an airplane. The records are taken photographically on a standard N.A.C.A. film drum and the instrument can be quickly installed in any airplane.
Wind Tunnel Development of Means to Alleviate Buffeting of the North American XP-82 Airplane at High Speeds
This report presents the results of wind-tunnel tests of a 0.22-scale model of the North American XP-82 airplane with several modifications designed to reduce the buffeting of the airplane. The effects of various modifications on the air flow over the model are shown by means of photographs of tufts. The drag, lift, and pitching-moment coefficients of the model with several of the modifications are shown. The result indicate that, by reflexing the trailing edge of the center section of the wing and modifying the radiator air-scoop gutter and the inboard lower-surface wing fillets, the start of buffeting can be delayed from a Mach number of 0.70 to 0.775, and that the diving tendency of the airplane would be eliminated up to a Mach number of 0.80.
An Investigation of the Wing and the Wing-Fuselage Combination of a Full-Scale Model of the Republic XP-91 Airplane in the Ames 40-by 80-Foot Wing Tunnel
Wind-tunnel tests of a full-scale model of the Republic XP-91 airplane were conducted to determine the longitudinal and lateral characteristics of the wing alone and the wing-fuselage combination, the characteristics of the aileron, and the damping in roll af the wing alone. Various high-lift devices were investigated including trailing-edge split flaps and partial- and full-span leading-edge slats and Krueger-type nose flaps. Results of this investigation showed that a very significant gain in maximum lift could be achieved through use of the proper leading-edge device, The maximum lift coefficient of the model with split flaps and the original partial-span straight slats was only 1.2; whereas a value of approximately 1.8 was obtained by drooping the slat and extending it full span, Improvement in maximum lift of approximately the same amount resulted when a full-span nose flap was substituted for the original partial-span slat.
An investigation of wing-body juncture interference effects at transonic speeds for several swept-wing and body combinations
No Description Available.
Investigation of wing characteristics at a Mach number of 1.53 I : triangular wings of aspect ratio 2
No Description Available.
Investigation of wing characteristics at a Mach number of 1.53 II : swept wings of taper ratio 0.5
Measured values of lift, drag, and pitching moment at M(sub o) = 1.53 are presented for seven wings varying in sweep angle from 60 degrees sweepforward to 60 degrees sweepback. All wings had a cambered, double-wedge section 5-percent thick and a common taper ratio of 0.5. The experimental results are compared with the predictions of the linear theory.
Investigation of wing characteristics at a Mach number of 1.53 III : unswept wings of differing aspect ratio and taper ratio
No Description Available.
Investigation of Wingless Missile Configurations with Folding Controls and Low-Aspect-Ratio Stabilizing Surfaces
Wind tunnel tests of wingless low aspect ratio folding control missile configurations.
Large-scale wind-tunnel tests of a jet-transport-type model with leading- and trailing-edge high-lift devices
No Description Available.
Large-scale wind-tunnel tests of an airplane model with a 45 degree sweptback wing of aspect ratio 2.8 with area suction applied to trailing-edge flaps and with several wing leading-edge modifications
No Description Available.
Lateral control characteristics and dihedral effect of a wing-body combination with a variable incidence triangular wing and wing-tip ailerons at a Mach number of 1.52
No Description Available.
Lateral and directional dynamic-response characteristics of a 35 degree swept-wing airplane as determined from flight measurements
No Description Available.
Lateral-directional aerodynamic characteristics of several coplanar triple-body missile configurations at Mach numbers from 0.6 to 1.4
No Description Available.
The lateral control characteristics of constant-percent-chord trailing-edge elevons on a pointed wing of aspect ratio 2 at Mach numbers up to 0.95
No Description Available.
Leading-edge contours for thin swept wings : an analysis of low-and high-speed data
No Description Available.
Lift and moment characteristics at subsonic Mach numbers of four 10-percent-thick airfoil sections of varying trailing-edge thickness
No Description Available.
Lift and pitching-moment interference between a pointed cylindrical body and triangular wings of various aspect ratios at Mach numbers of 1.50 and 2.02
No Description Available.