National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) - Browse

ABOUT BROWSE FEED

Two-Dimensional Subsonic Compressible Flows Past Arbitrary Bodies by the Variational Method

Description: Instead of solving the nonlinear differential equation which governs the compressible flow, an approximate method of solution by means of the variational method is used. The general problem of steady irrotational flow past an arbitrary body is formulated. Two examples were carried out, namely, the flow past a circular cylinder and the flow past a thin curved surface. The variational method yields results of velocity and pressure distributions which compare excellently with those found by existing methods. These results indicate that the variational method will yield good approximate solution for flow past both thick and thin bodies at both high and low Mach numbers.
Date: March 1951
Creator: Wang, Chi-Teh
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Thirty-Seventh Annual Report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics: Administrative Report Including Technical Report Nos. 1003 to 1058

Description: In accordance with the act of Congress, approved March 3,1915 (U.S. C. title 50, sec. 151), which established the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics the Committee submits its thirty-seventh annual report for the fiscal year 1951. The United States is engaged in expanding military aviation to levels never before reached except in the midst of a major war. In Korea, our military aircraft are engaged in combat with airplanes of an unfriendly nation evidently able to build military aircraft of increasing capabilities. In this environment, the NACA is responsible for conducting an adequate program of scientific research to open the way for the design of aircraft and missile of superior performance. Since World War II the pace of technical development has increased. Until then, improvement in aircraft performance as a result of the application of scientific research proceeded at what. now seems to be a relatively slow and orderly rate. Modest increases in speed, climb, range, or altitude were set as reasonable goals. Compressibility effects at high speeds were just beginning to be encountered and indicated a formidable barrier near the velocity of sound. This barrier has been found by research and experiment to be lees formidable than supposed, and we now see the possibility of radical gains in airplane performance that are of great military significance. Such gains are ak attainable by a potential enemy. The increased complexity of modern high performance.
Date: 1952
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tables for the Computation of Wave Drag of Arrow Wings of Arbitrary Airfoil Section

Description: Tables and computing instructions for the rapid evaluation of the wave drag of delta wings and of arrow wings having a ration of the tangent of the trailing-edge sweep angle to the tangent of the leading-edge sweep angle in the range from -1.0 to 0.8. The tables cover a range of both subsonic and supersonic leading edges.
Date: June 1954
Creator: Grant, Fredrick C. & Cooper, Morton
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

NACA Conference on aerodynamics of high-speed aircraft

Description: This document contains unedited reproductions of the technical papers presented by staff members of the NACA Laboratories at the NACA Conference on Aerodynamics of High-Speed Aircraft held at the Langley Aeronautical Laboratory November 1,2, and 3, 1955. The primary purpose of this conference was to convey to contractors of the military services and others concerned with the design of aircraft these recent research results and to provide those attending an opportunity to discuss the results. The papers in this document are in the same form in which they were orally presented at the conference to facilitate their prompt distribution. The original presenation and this record are considered as complementary to, rather than as substitutes for, the Committee's more complete and formal reports.
Date: November 1, 1955
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

NACA Conference on Aircraft Structures

Description: This document contains reproductions of technical papers on some of the most recent research results on aircraft structures from the NACA Laboratories. These papers were presented by members of the staff of the NACA Laboratories at the NACA conference held at the Langley Aeronautical Laboratory March 7, 1951. The purpose of this conference was to convey to those involved in the study of aircraft structures these recent research results and to provide those attending an opportunity for discussion of these results. The papers in this document are in the same form in which they were presented at the conference so that distribution of them might be prompt. The original presentation and this record are considered as complimentary to, rather than as substitute for, the Committee?s system of complete and formal reports.
Date: March 7, 1951
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

NACA Conference on high-speed aerodynamics

Description: This document contains reproductions of technical papers presented by staff members of the NACA Laboratories at the NACA Conference on High-Speed Aerodynamics held at the Ames Aeronautical Laboratory of the NACA, March 18, 19, and 20, 1958. The primary purpose of this conference was to convey to the military services and their contractors the results of recent research results and to provide those attending an opportunity to discuss the results. The papers in this document were prepared for presentation at the conference and are considered as complementary to, rather than as substitutes for, the Committee's more complete and formal reports.
Date: March 1, 1958
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Forty-Fourth Annual Report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics Administrative Report Including Technical Reports Nos. 1342 to 1392

Description: In accordance with act of Congress, approved March 3, 1915, as amended (U.S.C., title 50, .sw 151), which established the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, the Committee submits its Forty-fourth Annual Report for the fiscal year 1958. This is the Committee's final report to the Congress. The National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 (Public Law 85-568) provides in section 301 that the NACA "shall cease to exist" and "all functions, powers, duties, and obligations, and all real and personal property, personnel (other than members of the Committee), funds, and records of the NACA shall be transferred to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The aforesaid act provides that "this section shall take effect 90 days after the date of the enactment of this act, or on any earlier date on which the Administrator shall determining and announce by proclamation published in the Federal Register, that the Administration has been organized and is prepared to discharge the duties and exercise the power conferred upon it by this act." The Administrator, Hon. T. Keith Glennan has advised the Committee of his intention to issue such proclamation, effective October 1,1958.
Date: January 1, 1959
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Thirty-Ninth Annual Report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics: Administrative Report Including Technical Reports Nos. 1111 to 1157

Description: This is the fiftieth year since Wilbur and Orville Wright at Kitty Hawk N. C., made their powered flight. That airplane was a fragile and unsteady machine of no immediate utility. It flew for only a minute but it disclosed the solution of the age-old problem of human flight. The Wrights were the first in the history of man to fly. There was no one to teach them. They had to discover principles and to learn the art by cautious and methodical experimenting. From their own research they obtained the practical information needed to design their successful flying machine. The Wrights received no effective aid from the theoretical studies of flight made by the mathematicians of the nineteenth century. The science of aerodynamics was developed in response to the practical demands of aeronautics in the years to follow. In 1908, the Wrights demonstrated at Fort Myer, Va., a vastly improved flyer, the first military airplane. It carried a passenger and flew for more than an hour. Following this public demonstration, the development of the airplane was taken up vigorously. At first France and Germany took the lead, then Great Britain, but the United States lagged behind in the furthering of this greatest American development of the century. With war clouds in view in 1915, the Congress established the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics to undertake the scientific study of the problems of fight with a view to their practical solution. President Wilson appointed the members of the first Committee, consisting of the heads of the military and civil agencies of the Government concerned with aeronautics and experts from private life.
Date: January 1, 1955
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Average Outside-Surface Heat-Transfer Coefficients and Velocity Distributions for Heated and Cooled Impulse Turbine Blades in Static Cascades

Description: Heat-transfer investigation conducted on cooled as well heated impulse-type turbine blades in a static cascade to determine the effect of direction of heat flow on convective heat-transfer coefficients.
Date: March 9, 1951
Creator: Hubbartt, James E. & Schum, Eugene F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Acoustic analysis of ram-jet buzz

Description: From Introduction: "The surging of a system containing a centrifugal- or axial-flow compressor (e.g., refs. 1 to 4) is an example of self-sustained oscillation. Inlets designed for supersonic jet engines also have been observed to induce oscillations (e.g., refs. 5 to 11) which are usually referred to as "buzz." The origin of buzz in ram-jet engines is the subject of the present report."
Date: November 1955
Creator: Mirels, Harold
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Acoustic, thrust, and drag characteristics of several full-scale noise suppressors for turbojet engines

Description: From Introduction: " Considerable analytical and experimental research has been done to find means of reducing the noise levels of the turbojet transports. Noise levels can be decreased by engine redesign to reduce the jet-exit velocity (ref. 1), proper flight-climb techniques (ref. 2), and the use of noise-suppression exhaust nozzles (refs. 3 to 5). The present report is concerned with the last method."
Date: April 1958
Creator: Ciepluch, Carl C; North, Warren J; Coles, Willard D & Antl, Robert J
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department